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Gochujang

Cooking with Gochujang: Asia’s Original Hot Sauce
by Naomi Imatome

Move over, sriracha!

Sriracha sauce arrived on the hot sauce scene a few years ago and swept away the competition. Now, the new kid on the hot sauce block is gochujang.

Dating back to 17th-century Korea, gochujang is arguably the keystone ingredient in Korean cuisine. Its rich flavor and distinctive, lustrous red color are unmistakable. Unlike many Western chili sauces that have heat and not much else, gochujang begins with hot chilies but combines those chilies with miso and sweet rice to make a rich, complex-tasting paste that has heat, sweetness, and umami all packed into one package.

Cooking with Gochuchang will open your eyes to the secret chefs around the world have been discovering—that this traditional Korean ingredient and its myriad off-label uses can transform your kitchen. From eggs to meats, rice to vegetables—and even cocktails—your taste buds will never be the same.


Soybean and Nutrition
by Hany El-Shemy

Worldwide, soybean seed proteins represent a major source of amino acids for human and animal nutrition. Soybean seeds are an important and economical source of protein in the diet of many developed and developing countries. Soy is a complete protein and soy-foods are rich in vitamins and minerals. Soybean protein provides all the essential amino acids in the amounts needed for human health. Recent research suggests that soy may also lower risk of prostate, colon and breast cancers as well as osteoporosis and other bone health problems and alleviate hot flashes associated with menopause. This volume is expected to be useful for student, researchers and public who are interested in soybean.

Health Benefits of Fermented Foods and Beverages
by Jyoti Prakash Tamang

Health Benefits of Fermented Foods and Beverages discusses the functionality and myriad health benefits of fermented foods and beverages of the world. It examines health-promoting and therapeutic properties, covering the molecular process of fermentation and the resulting benefit to nutritional value and long-term health. Exploring a range of ferme

History of Soybeans and Soyfoods in Korea, and in Korean Cookbooks, Restaurants, and Korean Work with Soyfoods outside Korea
by William Shurtleff, Akiko Aoyagi

The world’s most comprehensive, well documented, and well illustrated book on soy in Korea. With extensive index and 80 photographs and illustration. Free of charge in digital format on Google Books


Ethnic Fermented Foods and Alcoholic Beverages of Asia
by Jyoti Prakash Tamang

Asia has a long history of preparation and consumption of various types of ethnic fermented foods and alcoholic beverages based on available raw substrates of plant or animal sources and also depending on agro-climatic conditions of the regions. Diversity of functional microorganisms in Asian ethnic fermented foods and alcoholic beverages consists of bacteria (Lactic acid bacteria and Bacillus species, micrococcii, etc.), amylolytic and alcohol-producing yeasts and filamentous moulds. Though there are hundreds of research articles, review papers, and limited books on fermented foods and beverages, the present book: Ethnic Fermented Foods and Alcoholic Beverages of Asia is the first of this kind on compilation of various ethnic fermented foods and alcoholic beverages of Asia. This book has fifteen chapters covering different types of ethnic fermented foods and alcoholic beverages of Asia. Some of the authors are well-known scientists and researchers with vast experiences in the field of fermented foods and beverages who include Prof. Tek Chand Bhalla, Dr. Namrata Thapa (India), Prof. Yearul Kabir and Dr. Mahmud Hossain (Bangladesh), Prof. Tika Karki (Nepal), Dr. Saeed Akhtar (Pakistan), Prof. Sagarika Ekanayake (Sri Lanka), Dr. Werasit Sanpamongkolchai (Thailand), Prof. Sh. Demberel (Mongolia), Dr. Yoshiaki Kitamura, Dr. Ken-Ichi Kusumoto, Dr. Yukio Magariyama, Dr. Tetsuya Oguma, Dr. Toshiro Nagai, Dr. Soichi Furukawa, Dr. Chise Suzuki, Dr. Masataka Satomi, Dr. Kazunori Takamine, Dr. Naonori Tamaki and Dr. Sota Yamamoto (Japan), Prof. Dong-Hwa Shin, Prof. Cherl-Ho Lee, Dr. Young-Myoung Kim, Dr. Wan-Soo Park Dr. Jae-Ho Kim (South Korea) Dr. Maryam Tajabadi Ebrahimi (Iran), Dr. Francisco B. Elegado (Philippines), Prof. Ingrid Suryanti Surono (Indonesia), Dr. Vu Nguyen Thanh (Vietnam). Researchers, students, teachers, nutritionists, dieticians, food entrepreneurs, agriculturalist, government policy makers, ethnologists, sociologists and electronic media persons may read this book who keep interest on biological importance of Asian fermented foods and beverages.

Cook Like a Local
by Chris Shepherd, Kaitlyn Goalen

Chris Shepherd, James Beard Award-winning chef of Houston’s Underbelly Hospitality, is a champion of that city’s incredibly diverse immigrant cuisines. In his restaurant, he calls out the names of the cooks–Vietnamese, Korean, Indian, and others—who have inspired him, and in his book, he teaches you how to work with those flavors and cultures with respect and creativity. 

Houston’s culinary reputation as a steakhouse town was put to rest by Chris Shepherd, the Robb Report’s Best Chef of the Year. A cook with insatiable curiosity, he’s trained not just in fine-dining restaurants but in Houston’s Korean grocery stores, Vietnamese noodle shops, Indian kitchens, and Chinese mom-and-pops. His food, incorporating elements of all these cuisines, tells the story of the city, and country, in which he lives. An advocate, not an appropriator, he asks his diners to go and visit the restaurants that have inspired him, and in this book he brings us along to meet, learn from, and cook with the people who have taught him. 

The recipes include signatures from his restaurant—favorites such as braised goat with Korean rice dumplings, or fried vegetables with caramelized fish sauce. The lessons go deeper than recipes: the book is about how to understand the pantries of different cuisines, how to taste and use these flavors in your own cooking. Organized around key ingredients like soy, dry spices, or chiles, the chapters function as master classes in using these seasonings to bring new flavors into your cooking and new life to flavors you already knew. But even beyond flavors and techniques, the book is about a bigger story: how Chris, a son of Oklahoma who looks like a football coach, came to be “adopted” by these immigrant cooks and families, how he learned to connect and share and truly cross cultures with a sense of generosity and respect, and how we can all learn to make not just better cooking, but a better community, one meal at a time.


The Kimchi Cookbook
by Lauryn Chun, Olga Massov

60 recipes and tips for creating and cooking with kimchi will add a kick of flavor to any plate.
 
Following traditional kimchi-making seasons and focusing on produce at its peak, this bold, colorful cookbook walks you step by step through how to make both robust and lighter kimchi. Lauryn Chun explores a wide variety of flavors and techniques for creating this live-culture food, from long-fermented classic winter kimchi intended to spice up bleak months to easy-to-make summer kimchi that highlights the freshness of produce and is ready to eat in just minutes.
 
Once you have made your own kimchi, using everything from tender and delicate young napa cabbage to stuffed eggplant, you can then use it as a star ingredient in Chun’s inventive recipes for cooking with kimchi. From favorites such as Pan-Fried Kimchi Dumplings and Kimchi Fried Rice to modern dishes like Kimchi Risotto, Skirt Steak Ssam with Kimchi Puree Chimichurri, Kimchi Oven-Baked Baby Back Ribs, and even a Kimchi Grapefruit Margarita, Chun showcases the incredible range of flavor kimchi adds to any plate.
 
With sixty recipes and beautiful photographs that will have you hooked on kimchi’s unique crunch and heat, The Kimchi Cookbook takes the champagne of pickles to new heights.