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Jim Corbett Omnibus

The second Jim Corbett omnibus
by Jim Corbett

Here, For The First Time, Three Classic Corbett Books Within The Covers Of One Hardback Voume, Jungle Lore; My India; Tree Tops.

The Jim Corbett Omnibus
by Jim Corbett

Man-Eaters of Kumaon, The Man-Eating Leopard of Rudraprayag, and The Temple Tiger and More Man-Eaters of Kumaon, the three classic collections of Corbett’s hunting stories, which vividly bring to life the drama and beauty of the jungle and its wildlife are here brought together in a single volume for the first time.

The Jim Corbett Omnibus
by Jim Corbett

Man-Eaters of Kumaon, The Man-Eating Leopard of Rudraprayag, and The Temple Tiger and More Man-Eaters of Kumaon, the three classic collections of Corbett’s hunting stories, which vividly bring to life the drama and beauty of the jungle and its wildlife are here brought together in a single volume for the first time.

THE DIARY OF AN UNREASONABLE MAN
by Madhav Mathur

Pranav Kumar is: (a) An advertising executive (b) An aspiring writer (c) An anarchist (d) A fugitive from the Mumbai Police (e) All of the above Pranav Kumar has had enough. He’s sick and tired of being a corporate drone convincing people that their lives are meaningless without the newest product he’s peddling. He hates that commercialism is the new mantra and people actually believe that you are what you own. Pranav Kumar wants to change the world. But how does one man make a whole country question the way we are when no one is interested in listening? Pranav and his friends decide to capture the eyeballs of the nation and shake up the system. Their methods are unorthodox; their message unique. They take over a TV station; expose an environmental scam; strike out at patrons of brothels; sabotage a glitzy fashion show; and paint-bomb a local train. But as the Anarchists of Mumbai ignite sparks of a much larger movement; they realize that doing good comes at a price; that the means are as important as the ends and that being hunted by the Mumbai police is perhaps better than being hunted by contract-killers. Bold; fresh and darkly comic; The Diary of an Unreasonable Man is an exceptional debut.

My Kumaon
by Jim Corbett

Hunter, naturalist, and conservationist, Jim Corbett is famous for slaying man-eating tigers and leopards in the Kumaon region of northern India. Frequently appealed to by the government of the United Provinces during the 1920s and the 1930s for help, Corbett is known to have shot nineteen tigers and fourteen leopards-all man-eaters. Corbett was encouraged to write about his hunting experiences by Roy E. Hawkins, manager of the Indian Branch of the Oxford University Press and a personal friend. An integral part of OUP India’s centenary celebrations, this volume includes Jim Corbett’s unpublished writings on man-eaters, nature, and his beloved Kumaon, personal letters, articles written for newspapers and gazettes by his contemporaries, and letters exchanged between Corbett and his publisher showcasing the development of his bestselling books-all from the archives of the Oxford University Press. It highlights Corbett’s engagement with the times in which he lived, his complete empathy with the people of Kumaon, his great understanding of tigers and leopards, and also the gradual development of his ideas about conservation and the need to preserve the tiger and its habitat. Chronicling the history of his bestselling books (Man-Eaters of Kumaon, The Man-Eating Leopard of Rudraprayag, and My India) and supported by rare photographs and evocative line drawings, this volume reflects the evolution of his writing as well as his long relationship with the Press.

My India
by Jim Corbett

Jim Corbett’s classic stories of man-eaters have made him a legend in India. This colorfully-written collection contains classic tales about the human beings who lived in the poignant rural world of the Indian foothills. Corbett, here, displays great sympathy and concern for these people through his sharp observations of their village life, traditions, and culture. Engaging the reader with great force, these stories will serve as an indispensable supplement for anyone who has enjoyed Corbett’s narrative gifts before.

Man-eaters of Kumaon
by Jim Corbett

Jim Corbett was every inch a hero, something like a “sahib” Davy Crockett: expert in the ways of the jungle, fearless in the pursuit of man-eating big cats, and above all a crack shot. Brought up on a hill-station in north-west India, he killed his first leopard before he was nine and went on to achieve a legendary reputation as a hunter.

Corbett was also an author of great renown. His books on the man-eating tigers he once tracked are not only established classics, but have by themselves created almost a separate literary genre. Man Eaters of Kumaon is the best known of Corbett’s books, one which offers ten fascinating and spine-tingling tales of pursuing and shooting tigers in the Indian Himalayas during the early years of this century. The stories also offer first-hand information about the exotic flora, fauna, and village life in this obscure and treacherous region of India, making it as interesting a travelogue as it is a compelling look at a bygone era of big-game hunting.


Jungle Lore
by Jim Corbett

Jim Corbett’s fame rests on his tales of hunting in the Indian jungle, but he was acutely sensitive to the fragility of nature and well ahead of his time in understanding the need for conservation. Jungle Lore is the closest Jim Corbett ever came to an autobiography, revealing his life-long passion for the people, jungle, and animals of the Kumaon hills in the Himalayan foothills, and his despair at humanity’s estrangement from its environment.

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Russian Journal

A Russian Journal
by John Steinbeck

Steinbeck and Capa’s account of their journey through Cold War Russia is a classic piece of reportage and travel writing.

 

Just after the Iron Curtain fell on Eastern Europe, Pulitzer Prize-winning author John Steinbeck and acclaimed war photographer Robert Capa ventured into the Soviet Union to report for the New York Herald Tribune. This rare opportunity took the famous travelers not only to Moscow and Stalingrad – now Volgograd – but through the countryside of the Ukraine and the Caucasus. Hailed by the New York Times as “superb” when it first appeared in 1948, A Russian Journal is the distillation of their journey and remains a remarkable memoir and unique historical document.

What they saw and movingly recorded in words and on film was what Steinbeck called “the great other side there … the private life of the Russian people.” Unlike other Western reporting about Russia at the time, A Russian Journal is free of ideological obsessions. Rather, Steinbeck and Capa recorded the grim realities of factory workers, government clerks, and peasants, as they emerged from the rubble of World War II—represented here in Capa’s stirring photographs alongside Steinbeck’s masterful prose. Through it all, we are given intimate glimpses of two artists at the height of their powers, answering their need to document human struggle. This edition features an introduction by Steinbeck scholar Susan Shillinglaw.

 

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.


Russian Journal
by Andrea Lee

“A subtly crafted reflection of both the bleak and golden shadings of Russian life . . . Its tones belong more to the realm of poetry than journalism.” –The New York Times Book Review

At age twenty-five, Andrea Lee joined her husband, a Harvard doctoral candidate in Russian history, for his eight months’ study at Moscow State University and an additional two months in Leningrad. Published to enormous critical acclaim in 1981, Russian Journal is the award-winning author’s penetrating, vivid account of her everyday life as an expatriate in Soviet culture, chronicling her fascinating exchanges with journalists, diplomats, and her Soviet contemporaries. The winner of the Jean Stein Award from the National Academy of Arts and Letters–and the book that launched Lee’s career as a writer–Russian Journal is a beautiful and clear-eyed travel-writing classic.

“[Lee] takes us wherever she is, conveying a feeling of place and atmosphere that is the mark of real talent.”
–The Washington Post Book World

“A book of very great charm . . . [Lee] records what she saw and heard with unassuming delicacy and exactness.”
–Newsweek

From the Trade Paperback edition.


Russian journal, 1965-1990
by Inge Morath, Yevgeny Aleksandrovich Yevtushenko

An acclaimed photographer’s images and the words of Russia’s foremost writers combine in an intimate record of the contemporary Russian experience: an intractable culture in the throes of irrevocable change. 30 color and 70 black-and-white photographs.

A Russian Diary
by Anna Politkovskaya

Anna Politkovskaya, one of Russia’s most fearless journalists, was gunned down in a contract killing in Moscow in the fall of 2006. Just before her death, Politkovskaya completed this searing, intimate record of life in Russia from the parliamentary elections of December 2003 to the grim summer of 2005, when the nation was still reeling from the horrors of the Beslan school siege. In A Russian Diary, Politkovskaya dares to tell the truth about the devastation of Russia under Vladimir Putin–a truth all the more urgent since her tragic death.
Writing with unflinching clarity, Politkovskaya depicts a society strangled by cynicism and corruption. As the Russian elections draw near, Politkovskaya describes how Putin neutralizes or jails his opponents, muzzles the press, shamelessly lies to the public–and then secures a sham landslide that plunges the populace into mass depression. In Moscow, oligarchs blow thousands of rubles on nights of partying while Russian soldiers freeze to death. Terrorist attacks become almost commonplace events. Basic freedoms dwindle daily.

And then, in September 2004, armed terrorists take more than twelve hundred hostages in the Beslan school, and a different kind of madness descends.
In prose incandescent with outrage, Politkovskaya captures both the horror and the absurdity of life in Putin’s Russia: She fearlessly interviews a deranged Chechen warlord in his fortified lair. She records the numb grief of a mother who lost a child in the Beslan siege and yet clings to the delusion that her son will return home someday. The staggering ostentation of the new rich, the glimmer of hope that comes with the organization of the Party of Soldiers’ Mothers, the mounting police brutality, the fathomless public apathy–all are woven into Politkovskaya’s devastating portrait of Russia today.

“If anybody thinks they can take comfort from the ‘optimistic’ forecast, let them do so,” Politkovskaya writes. “It is certainly the easier way, but it is also a death sentence for our grandchildren.”

A Russian Diary is testament to Politkovskaya’s ferocious refusal to take the easier way–and the terrible price she paid for it. It is a brilliant, uncompromising exposé of a deteriorating society by one of the world’s bravest writers.

Praise for Anna Politkovskaya
“Anna Politkovskaya defined the human conscience. Her relentless pursuit of the truth in the face of danger and darkness testifies to her distinguished place in journalism–and humanity. This book deserves to be widely read.”
–Christiane Amanpour, chief international correspondent, CNN

“Like all great investigative reporters, Anna Politkovskaya brought forward human truths that rewrote the official story. We will continue to read her, and learn from her, for years.”
–Salman Rushdie

“Suppression of freedom of speech, of expression, reaches its savage ultimate in the murder of a writer. Anna Politkovskaya refused to lie, in her work; her murder is a ghastly act, and an attack on world literature.”
–Nadine Gordimer

“Beyond mourning her, it would be more seemly to remember her by taking note of what she wrote.”
–James Meek

From the Hardcover edition.