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Justice

Generous Justice
by Timothy Keller

Renowned pastor and bestselling author of The Prodigal Prophet Timothy Keller shares his most provocative and illuminating message yet. 

It is commonly thought in secular society that the Bible is one of the greatest hindrances to doing justice. Isn’t it full of regressive views? Didn’t it condone slavery? Why look to the Bible for guidance on how to have a more just society? But Timothy Keller challenges these preconceived beliefs and presents the Bible as a fundamental source for promoting justice and compassion for those in need. In Generous Justice, he explores a life of justice empowered by an experience of grace: a generous, gracious justice. This book offers readers a new understanding of modern justice and human rights that will resonate with both the faithful and the skeptical.



Justice
by Harry Brighouse

Justice is a concise and accessible introduction to the central theories of justice in contemporary political theory. The book aims to provide readers with a clear understanding of the theories and the main objections to them, as well as showing how these theories engage with one another.

It offers detailed accounts of John Rawls’s theory of justice as fairness; the alternative ‘capabilities approach’ developed by Nobel-prize winning economist Amartya Sen; the libertarian theories of Milton Friedman and Robert Nozick; the ‘group-rights’ based theory of Will Kymlicka; and Nancy Fraser’s theory of participatory parity. The book also includes extensive discussions of the nature and purpose of political theorizing, and it asks whether theories of justice should take only social institutions as their subject, or should also comment on personal motivations and behaviour.


Justice
by Dan Mahoney

New York City. A wealthy businessman meets a violent fate in his elegant, carefully-secured home in Queens. Two drug dealers are murdered in a Brooklyn no-tell motel room. Several men are found riddled with bullets and nails on a little-traveled road beneath FDR Drive. And soon thereafter, a church, a synagogue, and a mosque find bags of cash waiting at their doorsteps-all from a vigilante who signs himself “Justice.”

NYPD Detective First Grade Brian McKenna and his partner, Cisco Sanchez (the self-described world’s greatest detective), are assigned to find the elusive killer that all of New York City is rooting for, a man of supreme technical skills, physical power, and intelligence, who always seems to know every move the police will make before they make it. Justice is executing drug dealers, helping the police close unsolved cases, providing those in need with stolen drug money, and creating a nightmare for the police commissioner, the mayor, and the two detectives.

As McKenna and Sanchez work to try and outsmart the vigilante and discover his next victim, they also must find out who is helping Justice in his quest for revenge.

Justice showcases fascinating investigative detail, wild action, and Dan Mahoney’s trademark humor in a terrific police thriller.


Justice
by Ronald L. Cohen

Ronald L. Cohen Justice is a central moral standard in social life. It is invoked in judging individual persons and in judging the basic structure of societies. It has been described as akin to a “human hunger or thirst” (Pascal, Pensees, cited in Hirschman, 1982, p. 91), “more powerful than any physical hunger, and endlessly resilient” (Pitkin, 1981, p. 349). The most prominent contemporary theory of justice proceeds from the claim that justice is “the first virtue of social institutions, as truth is systems of thought” (Rawls, 1971, p. 3). However, as the following chapters demonstrate, justice has a complex and controversial history. If, as has been claimed, justice is a central category of human thought and a central aspect of human motivation, can it also be the case that to invoke justice is no more than “banging on the table: an emotional expression which turns one’s demand into an absolute postulate” (Ross, 1959, p. 274)? If justice is the first virtue of social institutions, can the concept of social or economic justice at the same time be “entirely empty and meaningless” so that any attempt to employ it is “either thoughtless or fraudulent” (Hayek, 1976, pp. xi-xii)? In a formal sense, justice concerns ensuring that each person receives what she or he is due.

Pursuing Justice
by Ken Wytsma, David Jacobsen

The ONLY way to find abundant life and happiness is to give your life away.

If God designed us to experience true happiness and abundant life, why do so many Christians feel dissatisfied and purposeless? We try to make our lives better by chasing our own dreams, but that only makes the problem worse. Instead, the path to a just life that”s satisfying and permeated with meaning leads us alongside the orphan, the widow, and the powerless. Using clear evangelical theology and compelling narratives drawn from two decades of global ministry and travel, Ken Wytsma, the founder of The Justice Conference, shows God”s unchanging love for all His children. On the way, the author calls us back to a proper understanding of biblical justice, a redeeming glimpse into the true meaning of righteousness and the remarkable connection between our own joy, the joy of others, and the wondrous Gospel of Jesus Christ.

Pursuing Justice shows that God isn”t primarily concerned with personal piety but about empowering His children to do justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with their creator. The message is as hopeful as it is fresh: when you discover anew the meaning of the Gospel and give your life away, you will find it…and it will be the best life you can imagine.

First-time author Wytsma (with an assist from Jacobsen) is one of the new breed of evangelical Christians returning to scripture to redeem justice as a central tenet of faith…. Wytsma infuses his writing with fresh experiences from working with the millennial generation…. “Apathy tells us that it”s perfectly acceptable to live with illusions of our own justice,” he writes, neatly linking those concerns. This accessible guide provides trustworthy scriptural analysis, examples of contemporary justice issues…and a solid philosophy for understanding the role of justice in today”s society…. “Justice cannot be divorced from God”s heart and purposes,” he writes. “It permeates them.” Wytsma”s authorial voice is engaging, encouraging, and invitational. His humor helps the reader recognize her own humanity and transformative potential within the unfolding moral arc of the universe.

Publishers Weekly

“Justice has become trendy. Ken Wytsma”s Pursuing Justice avoids all the pitfalls of trendiness. It exhibits a deep and accurate understanding of the nature of justice. It is an eye-opener.”

–NICHOL AS WOLTERSTORFF, Noah Porter Professor Emeritus of Philosophical Theology, Yale University; Senior Research Fellow, Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture, University of Virginia

“Ken is a fresh voice of balance, humility, and collaboration. His enthusiasm is contagious and his challenge to the church to not only do justice, but to learn to do it well, is commendable.”

–KEITH WRIGHT, International President of Food for the Hungry

“Ken Wytsma”s Pursuing Justice will rattle you. Not since C. S. Lewis put down his pen have readers been so provoked to think. It will change the way you approach others.”

–KAREN SPEARS ZACHARIAS, Author ofA Silence of Mockingbirds and Will Jesus Buy Me a Double-Wide?

“Ken Wytsma not only brings us back to a biblical understanding of justice, but also humbly calls us to pursue it in practice. I was both enlightened and motivated.”

–RANDAL ROBERTS, President of Western Seminary, Portland, OR

“In Pursuing Justice, Ken is at the cutting edge of where God”s heart is. This book is timely and needs to be read by everyone in the church.”

–JOHN M . PERKINS, Civil Rights Leader, Founder of the Christian Community Development Association (CCDA), and Founder of The John Perkins Foundation for Reconciliation and Development


Justice as Fairness
by John Rawls, Professor John Rawls

This book originated as lectures for a course on political philosophy that Rawls taught regularly at Harvard in the 1980s. In time the lectures became a restatement of his theory of justice as fairness, revised in light of his more recent papers and his treatise Political Liberalism (1993). As Rawls writes in the preface, the restatement presents “in one place an account of justice as fairness as I now see it, drawing on all [my previous] works.” He offers a broad overview of his main lines of thought and also explores specific issues never before addressed in any of his writings.

Rawls is well aware that since the publication of A Theory of Justice in 1971, American society has moved farther away from the idea of justice as fairness. Yet his ideas retain their power and relevance to debates in a pluralistic society about the meaning and theoretical viability of liberalism. This book demonstrates that moral clarity can be achieved even when a collective commitment to justice is uncertain.


Obstruction of Justice
by Luke Rosiak

Investigative reporter Luke Rosiak is being hailed as “one of the smartest, most diligent reporters in Washington” (TUCKER CARLSON) and “a bulldog” (DANA LOESCH) for uncovering “what is possibly the largest scandal and coverup in the history of the United States House of Representatives” (NEWT GINGRICH).

It’s like something out of a spy novel: In the heat of the 2016 election, an unvetted Pakistani national with a proclivity for blackmail gained access to the computer files of one in five Democrats in the House of Representatives. He and his family lifted data off the House network, stole the identity of an intelligence specialist, and sent congressional electronic equipment to foreign officials. And that was only the beginning.

Rather than protect national security, Congress and the Justice Department schemed to cover up a politically inconvenient hack and an underlying fraud on Capitol Hill involving dozens of Democrats’ offices. Evidence disappeared, witnesses were threatened, and the supposed watchdogs in the media turned a blind eye.

Combining tenacious investigative reporting and high-tech investigative techniques, Luke Rosiak began ferreting out the truth, and found himself face to face with the “Deep State,” observing how Nancy Pelosi’s Democrats manipulated the Department of Justice, the media, and even Republican leadership to sabotage the investigation into what Newt Gingrich calls possibly the biggest congressional scandal in history.


Transitional Justice
by Ruti G. Teitel

At the century’s end, societies all over the world are throwing off the yoke of authoritarian rule and beginning to build democracies. At any such time of radical change, the question arises: should a society punish its ancien regime or let bygones be bygones? Transitional Justice takes this question to a new level with an interdisciplinary approach that challenges the very terms of the contemporary debate. Ruti Teitel explores the recurring dilemma of how regimes should respond to evil rule, arguing against the prevailing view favoring punishment, yet contending that the law nevertheless plays a profound role in periods of radical change. Pursuing a comparative and historical approach, she presents a compelling analysis of constitutional, legislative, and administrative responses to injustice following political upheaval. She proposes a new normative conception of justice–one that is highly politicized–offering glimmerings of the rule of law that, in her view, have become symbols of liberal transition. Its challenge to the prevailing assumptions about transitional periods makes this timely and provocative book essential reading for policymakers and scholars of revolution and new democracies.

What is Justice?
by Hans Kelsen

Originally published: Berkeley: University of California Press, 1957. [vi], 397 pp. Through the lens of science, Hans Kelsen proposes a dynamic theory of natural law, examines Platonic and Aristotelian doctrines of justice and the idea of justice as found in the holy scriptures. “You simply cannot get around this book if you want a real understanding of the fundamental ideas on which the great work of Kelsen is built. Reading this volume you may once more admire the transparent clarity of style and the merciless consistency of reasoning which are well known qualities of this author.” — Alf Ross, 45 California Law Review 564 1957. Possibly the most influential jurisprudent of the twentieth century, Hans Kelsen [1881-1973] was legal adviser to Austria’s last emperor and its first republican government, the founder and permanent advisor of the Supreme Constitutional Court of Austria, and the author of Austria’s Constitution, which was enacted in 1920, abolished during the Anschluss, and restored in 1945. He was the author of more than forty books on law and legal philosophy. Active as a teacher in Europe and the United States, he was Dean of the Law Faculty of the University of Vienna and taught at the universities of Cologne and Prague, the Institute of International Studies in Geneva, Harvard, Wellesley, the University of California at Berkeley, and the Naval War College.