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Philosophy: Who Needs It

Philosophy
by Ayn Rand

This collection of essays was the last work planned by Ayn Rand before her death in 1982. In it, she summarizes her view of philosophy and deals with a broad spectrum of topics.

According to Ayn Rand, the choice we make is not whether to have a philosophy, but which one to have: rational, conscious, and therefore practical; or contradictory, unidentified, and ultimately lethal.

Written with all the clarity and eloquence that have placed Ayn Rand’s Objectivist philosophy in the mainstream of American thought, these essays range over such basic issues as education, morality, censorship, and inflation to prove that philosophy is the fundamental force in all our lives.


Philosophy
by Ayn Rand

In these essays, Ayn Rand reveals the hidden philosophic premises at work in the human soul. Her powerful mind ranges to every corner of the culture; her brilliant pen writes with the dispassionate clarity and passionate eloquence that are her literary trademarks. The book’s theme is expressed in the title essay, originally given as an address to a graduating class at West Point. To the question: “Who needs philosophy?” Miss Rand answere: “Everyone.” “A philosophic system,” she writes, “is and intefrated view of existence. As a human being, you have no choice about the fact that you need philosophy. Your only choice is whether you define your philosophy by conscious, rational, disciplined process of thought…or let your subconscious accumulate a junk heap of unwarranted conclusions……..” Philosophy, according to Ayn Rand, is the fundamental factor in human life; consciously or subconsciously, it is the basic factor that shapes the character of men, and the culture and destiny of nations. It shapes them for good or for evil, depending on the kind of philosophy they accept. Our choice, Miss Rand holds, is this : a philosophy of reason, rational selfishness, and laissez-faire capitalism–or a philosophy of irrationalism, altruism, and collectivism. Today’s world, she believes, is being destroyed by these latter ideas. The philosophy of reason she offers as the alternative is called Objectivism.

The Ayn Rand Lexicon
by Ayn Rand

A prolific writer, bestselling novelist, and world-renowned philosopher, Ayn Rand defined a full system of thought–from epistemology to aesthetics. Her writing is so extensive and the range of issues she covers so enormous that those interested in finding her discussions of a given topic may have to search through many sources to locate the relevant passage. The Ayn Rand Lexicon brings together all the key ideas of her philosophy of Objectivism. Begun under Rand’s supervision, this unique volume is an invaluable guide to her philosophy or reason, self-interest and laissez-faire capitalism–the philosophy so brilliantly dramatized in her novels The Fountainhead, We the Living, and Anthem.

Why Businessmen Need Philosophy
by Debi Ghate, Richard E. Ralston

The intellectual tooks every business person needs in the boardroom. Includes two rare essays by Ayn Rand!

With government and the media blaming big business for the world economic crisis, capitalism needs all the help it can get. It’s the perfect time for this collection of essays presenting a philosophical defense of capitalism by Ayn Rand and other Objectivist intellectuals. Essential and practical, Why Businessmen Need Philosophy reveals the importance of maintaining philosophical principles in the corporate environment at all levels of business from daily operations to executive decisions, and provides the tactical and tactful rational thinking required to defend companies from ideological attacks.


The Voice of Reason
by Ayn Rand

Between 1961, when she gave her first talk at the Ford Hall Forum in Boston, and 1981, when she gave the last talk of her life in New Orleans, Ayn Rand spoke and wrote about topics as varied as education, medicine, Vietnam, and the death of Marilyn Monroe. In The Voice of Reason, these pieces, written in the last decades of Rand’s life, are gathered in book form for the first time. With them are five essays by Leonard Peikoff, Rand’s longtime associate and literary executor. The work concludes with Peikoff’s epilogue, “My Thirty Years With Ayn Rand: An Intellectual Memoir,” which answers the question “What was Ayn Rand really like?” Important reading for all thinking individuals, Rand’s later writings reflect a life lived on principle, a probing mind, and a passionate intensity. This collection communicates not only Rand’s singular worldview, but also the penetrating cultural and political analysis to which it gives rise.

For the New Intellectual
by Ayn Rand

Here is Ayn Rand’s first non-fiction work—a challenge to the prevalent philosophical doctrines of our time and the “atmosphere of guilt, of panic, of despair, of boredom, and of all-pervasive evasion” that they create.

As incisive and relevant today as it was sixty years ago, this book presents the essentials of Ayn Rand’s philosophy “for those who wish to acquire an integrated view of existence.” In the title essay, she offers an analysis of Western culture, discusses the causes of its progress, its decline, its present bankruptcy, and points the road to an intellectual renaissance.

One of the most controversial figures on the intellectual scene, Ayn Rand was the proponent of a moral philosophy—and ethic of rational self-interest—that stands in sharp opposition to the ethics of altruism and self-sacrifice. The fundamentals of this morality—”a philosophy for living on Earth”—are here vibrantly set forth by the spokesman for a new class, For the New Intellectual.


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We The Living

We the Living
by Ayn Rand

Ayn Rand’s first published novel, a timeless story that explores the struggles of the individual against the state in Soviet Russia.

First published in 1936, We the Living portrays the impact of the Russian Revolution on three human beings who demand the right to live their own lives and pursue their own happiness. It tells of a young woman’s passionate love, held like a fortress against the corrupting evil of a totalitarian state.

We the Living is not a story of politics, but of the men and women who have to struggle for existence behind the Red banners and slogans. It is a picture of what those slogans do to human beings. What happens to the defiant ones? What happens to those who succumb?

Against a vivid panorama of political revolution and personal revolt, Ayn Rand shows what the theory of socialism means in practice. 

Includes an Introduction and Afterword by Ayn Rand’s Philosophical Heir, Leonard Peikoff


We the Living
by Ayn Rand

The first literary work of one of the most influential philosophers and novelists of the twentieth century-available for the first time in trade paperback.

Ayn Rand wrote of her first novel, We the Living, “It is as near to an autobiography as I will ever write. The plot is invented, the background is not…The specific events of Kira’s life were not mine: her ideas, her convictions, her values, were and are.” We the Living depicts the struggle of the individual against the state, and the impact of the Russian Revolution on three human beings who demand the right to live their own lives and pursue their own happiness. It tells of a young woman’s passionate love, held like a fortress against the corrupting evil of a totalitarian state.

This classic novel is not a story of politics, but of the men and women who have to struggle for existence behind the banners and slogans.


Essays on Ayn Rand’s “We the Living”
by Robert Mayhew

Ayn Rand remains a truly significant figure of modern philosophy. Her unique vision of a world in which man, relying on reason, acts wholly for his own good is skillfully developed and illustrated in her most famous novels, Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead. But Rand’s first novel, We the Living, a lesser-known but no less important book, offers an early form of the author’s nascent philosophy—the philosophy Rand later called Objectivism.

In the second edition, Robert Mayhew once again brings together pre-eminent scholars of Rand’s writing. The edition includes three new chapters, as well as an epilogue by renowned Rand-scholar Leonard Peikoff. In part a history of We the Living, from its earliest drafts to the Italian film later based upon it, Mayhew’s collection goes on to explore the enduring significance of Rand’s first novel as a work both of philosophy and of literature. For Ayn Rand scholars and fans alike, this enhanced second edition is a compelling examination of a novel that set the tone for some of the most influential philosophical literature to follow.


Essays on Ayn Rand’s “We the Living”
by Robert Mayhew

Ayn Rand remains a truly significant figure of modern philosophy. Her unique vision of a world in which man, relying on reason, acts wholly for his own good is skillfully developed and illustrated in her most famous novels, Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead. But Rand’s first novel, We the Living, a lesser-known but no less important book, offers an early form of the author’s nascent philosophy–the philosophy Rand later called Objectivism. Robert Mayhew’s collection of entirely new essays brings together pre-eminent scholars of Rand’s writing. In part a history of We the Living, from its earliest drafts to the Italian film later based upon it, Mayhew’s collection goes on to explore the enduring significance of Rand’s first novel as a work both of philosophy and of literature. For Ayn Rand scholars and fans alike, this collection is a compelling examination of a novel that set the tone for some of the most influential philosophical literature to follow.

The Unconquered
by Ayn Rand

Ayn Rand was an American novelist, philosopher, playwright, and screenwriter. She is known for her two best-selling novels, The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged, and for developing a philosophical system known as Objectivism.

In the 1930s, Rand was asked to adapt her first novel, We the Living, for the theatre. We the Living is a story of life in post-revolutionary Russia and Rand’s first statement against communism. It was not a commercial success when it was published, but has gone on to sell over 3 million copies.

The first substantial fiction of Rand to appear in over twenty years, this important volume contains two never-before published versions of the play – the first and last versions (the latter entitled The Unconquered). With a preface that places the work in its historical and political context, an essay on the history of the theatrical adaptation by Jeff Britting, the curator of the Ayn Rand Archives, and two alternative endings, this book is a must-have for anyone interested in Rand’s philosophy.


Anthem
by Ayn Rand

Anthem by Ayn Rand from Coterie Classics

All Coterie Classics have been formatted for ereaders and devices and include a bonus link to the free audio book.

“I stand here on the summit of the mountain. I lift my head and I spread my arms. This, my body and spirit, this is the end of the quest. I wished to know the meaning of all things. I am the meaning. I wished to find a warrant for being. I need no warrant for being, and no word of sanction upon my being. I am the warrant and the sanction. Neither am I the means to any end others may wish to accomplish. I am not a tool for their use. I am not a servant of their needs. I am not a sacrifice on their alters.” ― Ayn Rand, Anthem
Ayn Randy’s dystopian novel imagines a world where the concept of self has been erased. When one man stands against the establishment, he dares to utter the word “I.”
This Xist Classics edition has been professionally formatted for e-readers with a linked table of contents. This eBook also contains a bonus book club leadership guide and discussion questions. We hope you’ll share this book with your friends, neighbors and colleagues and can’t wait to hear what you have to say about it.

Xist Publishing is a digital-first publisher. Xist Publishing creates books for the touchscreen generation and is dedicated to helping everyone develop a lifetime love of reading, no matter what form it takes


The passion of Ayn Rand
by Barbara Branden

Based on interviews with Rand and discussions with those close to her, this biography describes her life from her youth in Russia, to her stint in Hollywood as a screenwriter, and through her marriage, the publication of her novels, and the evolution of h

The Early Ayn Rand
by Ayn Rand

This remarkable, newly revised collection of Ayn Rand’s early fiction—including her previously unpublished short story The Night King—ranges from beginner’s exercises to excerpts from early versions of We the Living and The Fountainhead.

We, the Living
by Michael J. Schweitzer

An Empire, which has ruled the world for over a thousand years, is swept away. And the Undead, rising from the ashes of the Invasion of the Vozhan Bur, take control… And so begins “We, the Living”, the third and final book in Michael J. Schweitzer’s remarkable The Unending War fantasy fiction trilogy that began with “The Curse of Garnel Ironheart” and continued with “The Ashes of Alladag”. Once again, a ragtag group of friends sets out to save the world from the forces of evil. But now they face truly life-threatening obstacles — and not all will survive. Not since The Lord of the Rings has there been such a fascinating and spell-binding fantasy trilogy. With engaging, well-drawn characters, touches of humour, fast-paced storyline and an intricate plot full of twists and turns, “We, the Living” is a worthy successor to the first two books and another terrific contribution to the fantasy genre. This is Schweitzer at his best, creating and instilling whole new worlds with epic, breath-taking adventures.

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Return Of The Primitive

The Return of the Primitive
by Ayn Rand

In the tumultuous late 60s and early 70s, a social movement known as the “New Left” emerged as a major cultural influence, especially on the youth of America. It was a movement that embraced “flower-power” and psychedelic “consciousness-expansion,” that lionized Ho Chi Minh and Fidel Castro and launched the Black Panthers and the Theater of the Absurd.In Return Of The Primitive (originally published in 1971 as The New Left), Ayn Rand, bestselling novelist and originator of the theory of Objectivism, identified the intellectual roots of this movement. She urged people to repudiate its mindless nihilism and to uphold, instead, a philosophy of reason, individualism, capitalism, and technological progress.Editor Peter Schwartz, in this new, expanded version of The New Left, has reorganized Rand’s essays and added some of his own in order to underscore the continuing relevance of her analysis of that period. He examines such current ideologies as feminism, environmentalism and multiculturalism and argues that the same primitive, tribalist, “anti-industrial” mentality which animated the New Left a generation ago is shaping society today.

Primitive Technology
by Society of Primitive Technology

Living in modern society, we have become increasingly disassociated from the earth, from the essence of ourselves, and the need is awakened in us to return to the wilderness–physically and emotionally. We long to feel a sense of connection with our ancient roots. This urge is what has prompted man’s fascination with primitive skills: producing objects from natural materials using methods similar to prehistoric cultures.
Primitive Technology: A Book of Earth Skills is a sharing of ideas–the philosophies, the history, and the personal stories by the authorities on primitive technology from teh pages of The Bulletin of Primitive Technology.
Included are instructions for creating fire and tools of wood, stone, and bone, as well as fiber adhesives, projectiles, art, and music. Practicing these primitive methods will lead the seeker towards a tangible, raw connection with the ancient past, with nature’s resources and, ultimately, with the creative forces that constructed the foundation of man’s survival on the planet.

Unlearn, Rewild
by Miles Olson

Wild by nature – radical sustainability skills and ideas for a post-industrial future

Primitive Rebels
by Eric J. Hobsbawm

Little attention has been paid to modern movements of social protest which fall outside the classic patterns of labor or socialist agitation, and even less to those whose political coloring is not modernist or progressive but conservative, or reactionary or, at any rate, rather inarticulate.

Paris Primitive
by Sally Price

In 1990 Jacques Chirac, the future president of France and a passionate fan of non-European art, met Jacques Kerchache, a maverick art collector with the lifelong ambition of displaying African sculpture in the holy temple of French culture, the Louvre. Together they began laying plans, and ten years later African fetishes were on view under the same roof as the Mona Lisa. Then, in 2006, amidst a maelstrom of controversy and hype, Chirac presided over the opening of a new museum dedicated to primitive art in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower: the Musée du Quai Branly.

Paris Primitive recounts the massive reconfiguration of Paris’s museum world that resulted from Chirac’s dream, set against a backdrop of personal and national politics, intellectual life, and the role of culture in French society. Along with exposing the machinations that led to the MQB’s creation, Sally Price addresses the thorny questions it raises about the legacy of colonialism, the balance between aesthetic judgments and ethnographic context, and the role of institutions of art and culture in an increasingly diverse France. Anyone with a stake in the myriad political, cultural, and anthropological issues raised by the MQB will find Price’s account fascinating.


Return to Eden
by Harry Harrison

Return to Eden is a novel by Harry Harrison, author of innumerable science fiction novels and stories.

At the Publisher’s request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.


Primitive Meteorites and Asteroids
by Neyda M. Abreu

Primitive Meteorites and Asteroids: Physical, Chemical, and Spectroscopic Observations Paving the Way to Exploration covers the physical, chemical and spectroscopic aspects of asteroids, providing important data and research on carbonaceous chondrites and primitive meteorites. This information is crucial to the success of missions to parent bodies, thus contributing to an understanding of the early solar system. The book offers an interdisciplinary perspective relevant to many fields of planetary science, as well as cosmochemistry, planetary astronomy, astrobiology, geology and space engineering.

Including contributions from planetary and missions scientists worldwide, the book collects the fundamental knowledge and cutting-edge research on carbonaceous chondrites and their parent bodies into one accessible resource, thus contributing to the future of space exploration.

  • Presents the most current data and information on the mission-relevant characteristics of primitive asteroids
  • Addresses the physical, chemical and spectral characteristics of carbonaceous chondritic meteorites and the bearings on successful exploration of their parent asteroids
  • Includes chapters on geotechnical properties and resource extraction

Black Venus
by T. Denean Sharpley-Whiting

Black Venus is a feminist study of the representations of black women in the literary, cultural, and scientific imagination of nineteenth-century France. Employing psychoanalysis, feminist film theory, and the critical race theory articulated in the works of Frantz Fanon and Toni Morrison, T. Denean Sharpley-Whiting argues that black women historically invoked both desire and primal fear in French men. By inspiring repulsion, attraction, and anxiety, they gave rise in the nineteenth-century French male imagination to the primitive narrative of Black Venus.
The book opens with an exploration of scientific discourse on black females, using Sarah Bartmann, the so-called Hottentot Venus, and natural scientist Georges Cuvier as points of departure. To further show how the image of a savage was projected onto the bodies of black women, Sharpley-Whiting moves into popular culture with an analysis of an 1814 vaudeville caricature of Bartmann, then shifts onto the terrain of canonical French literature and colonial cinema, exploring the representation of black women by Baudelaire, Balzac, Zola, Maupassant, and Loti. After venturing into twentieth-century film with an analysis of Josephine Baker’s popular Princesse Tam Tam, the study concludes with a discussion of how black Francophone women writers and activists countered stereotypical representations of black female bodies during this period. A first-time translation of the vaudeville show The Hottentot Venus, or Hatred of Frenchwomen supplements this critique of the French male gaze of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
Both intellectually rigorous and culturally intriguing, this study will appeal to students and scholars in the fields of nineteenth- and twentieth-century French literature, feminist and gender studies, black studies, and cultural studies.