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Veil: Secret Wars Of The Cia

Veil
by Bob Woodward

Veilis the story of the covert wars that were waged in Central America, Iran and Libya in a secretive atmosphere and became the centerpieces and eventual time bombs of American foreign policy in the 1980s.

Bush At War
by Bob Woodward

With his unmatched investigative skill, Bob Woodward tells the behind-the-scenes story of how President George W. Bush and his top national security advisers led the nation to war. Extensive quotations from the secret deliberations of the National Security Council and firsthand revelations of the private thoughts, concerns and fears of the president and his war cabinet, make BUSH AT WAR an unprecedented chronicle of a modern presidency in a time of grave crisis.

Based on interviews with more than a hundred sources and four hours of exclusive interviews with the president, BUSH AT WAR reveals Bush’s sweeping, almost grandiose vision for remaking the world. Woodward’s virtual wiretap into the White House Situation Room reveals a stunning group portrait of an untested president and his advisers, three of whom might themselves have made it to the presidency.

In BUSH AT WAR, Bob Woodward once again delivers a reporting tour de force.


The Brethren
by Bob Woodward, Scott Armstrong

The Brethren is the first detailed behind-the-scenes account of the Supreme Court in action.

Bob Woodward and Scott Armstrong have pierced its secrecy to give us an unprecedented view of the Chief and Associate Justices—maneuvering, arguing, politicking, compromising, and making decisions that affect every major area of American life.


The American Agent
by Richard L. Holm

Dick Holm joined the Central Intelligence Agency in the 1960s and rose rapidly through the ranks to become Bureau Chief in Paris, eventually earning the Distinguished Intelligence Medal, the CIA’s highest award. His first posting was in Laos, where he served in the CIA’s “Secret War” against the Communists in the lead-up to the Vietnam War. He was then sent to the Congo and suffered near-fatal injuries after a plane crash in a remote jungle. Healed by local tribesmen, his horrific burns treated with snake oil and tree bark, he then spent two years in a U.S. hospital undergoing extensive surgery. Holm also worked in Hong Kong and Paris and was instrumental in anti-terrorism operations during Carlos the Jackal’s international terror campaign. Having served under 13 CIA directors, Holm has firm, highly informed views on the policies—past and present, national and international—that determine how, where, and why the CIA works.

Tragic Mountains
by Jane Hamilton-Merritt

This is an important story, little acknowledged–let alone reported–in the world press. Highly recommended.” –Library Journal

In this important work, Dr. Jane Hamilton-Merritt traces the support rendered to the United States by the Hmong people of Laos during the decades-long struggle for the soul of Indochina which we speciously call the Vietnam War. The result of fourteen years of meticulous research, Hamilton-Merritt’s book pushes back the veil of official secrecy which has so long surrounded so much of the “secret war” in Laos.” –Journal of American History

It is an impressive work, product of an enormous amount of research. The author is to be commended both for her dedication and her contribution to scholarship.” –Institute of East Asian Studies, University of California

Tragic Mountains is a compelling read, a fine journalist’s contribution to a little-known facet of America’s Vietnam War, as well as her appeal to the American conscience to honour what she passionately believes to be her country’s moral obligation to its former Hmong allies in highland Laos.” –Journal of Southeast Asian Studies

I have read and reviewed hundreds of books on the Indochina wars, but few have had the impact of this seminal work, which vividly depicts the abandonment, betrayal, and attempted genocide of a proud and courageous people.” –Infantry

Tragic Mountains is not only a fair and accurate account of the experiences of [the Hmong], it is an engrossing tale of humanity under conditions of danger, heroism, and eventual defeat.” –William E. Colby, former director of the Central Intelligence Agency

Tragic Mountains tells the story of the Hmong’s struggle for freedom and survival in Laos from 1942 through 1992. During those years, most Hmong sided with the French against the Japanese and Ho Chi Minh’s Viet Minh, and then with the Americans against the North Vietnamese.

This is a story of courage, tenacity, brutality, secrecy, incredible h


Plan of Attack
by Bob Woodward

Award-winning journalist Bob Woodward has spent over thirty years in Washington’s corridors of power. In All the President’s Men it was he, together with Carl Bernstein, who exposed the Watergate scandal and he has been giving us a privileged front-row seat to White-House intrigue and decision-making ever since.

With PLAN OF ATTACK he brings his investigative skills to bear on the administration of George W. Bush, and the build-up to war in Iraq. What emerges is a fascinating and intimate portrait of the leading powers in Bush’s war council and their allies overseas as they prepare their pre-emptive attack and change the course of history.


Back fire
by Roger Warner

Documenting the secret war the United States waged in Laos from 1960 to 1973, an account reveals guerrilla raids, warring princes, and a CIA operative who raised an army in a series of events that led to the Vietnam War. 20,000 first printing.

The President’s Book of Secrets
by David Priess

Every president has had a unique and complicated relationship with the intelligence community. While some have been coolly distant, even adversarial, others have found their intelligence agencies to be among the most valuable instruments of policy and power.

Since John F. Kennedy’s presidency, this relationship has been distilled into a personalized daily report: a short summary of what the intelligence apparatus considers the most crucial information for the president to know that day about global threats and opportunities. This top–secret document is known as the President’s Daily Brief, or, within national security circles, simply “the Book.” Presidents have spent anywhere from a few moments (Richard Nixon) to a healthy part of their day (George W. Bush) consumed by its contents; some (Bill Clinton and George H. W. Bush) consider it far and away the most important document they saw on a regular basis while commander in chief.

The details of most PDBs are highly classified, and will remain so for many years. But the process by which the intelligence community develops and presents the Book is a fascinating look into the operation of power at the highest levels. David Priess, a former intelligence officer and daily briefer, has interviewed every living president and vice president as well as more than one hundred others intimately involved with the production and delivery of the president’s book of secrets. He offers an unprecedented window into the decision making of every president from Kennedy to Obama, with many character–rich stories revealed here for the first time.


A Question of Torture
by Alfred McCoy

A startling exposé of the CIA’s development and spread of psychological torture, from the Cold War to Abu Ghraib and beyond

In this revelatory account of the CIA’s secret, fifty-year effort to develop new forms of torture, historian Alfred W. McCoy uncovers the deep, disturbing roots of recent scandals at Abu Ghraib and Guantánamo. Far from aberrations, as the White House has claimed, A Question of Torture shows that these abuses are the product of a long-standing covert program of interrogation.
Developed at the cost of billions of dollars, the CIA’s method combined “sensory deprivation” and “self-inflicted pain” to create a revolutionary psychological approach—the first innovation in torture in centuries. The simple techniques—involving isolation, hooding, hours of standing, extremes of hot and cold, and manipulation of time—constitute an all-out assault on the victim’s senses, destroying the basis of personal identity. McCoy follows the years of research—which, he reveals, compromised universities and the U.S. Army—and the method’s dissemination, from Vietnam through Iran to Central America. He traces how after 9/11 torture became Washington’s weapon of choice in both the CIA’s global prisons and in “torture-friendly” countries to which detainees are dispatched. Finally McCoy argues that information extracted by coercion is worthless, making a case for the legal approach favored by the FBI.
Scrupulously documented and grippingly told, A Question of Torture is a devastating indictment of inhumane practices that have spread throughout the intelligence system, damaging American’s laws, military, and international standing.


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All The President’s Men

All the President’s men
by Carl Bernstein, Bob Woodward

THIS IS THE BOOK THAT CHANGED AMERICA Beginning with the story of a simple burglary at Democratic headquarters and then continuing with headline after headline, Bernstein and Woodward kept the tale of conspiracy and the trail of dirty tricks coming — delivering the stunning revelations and pieces in the Watergate puzzle that brought about Nixon’s scandalous downfall. Their explosive reports won a Pulitzer Prize for “The Washington Post” and toppled the President. THESE ARE THE AUTHORS WHO INTRODUCED US TO THE WORDS “DEEP THROAT.”

The Last of the President’s Men
by Bob Woodward

Bob Woodward exposes one of the final pieces of the Richard Nixon puzzle in this “intimate but disturbing portrayal of Nixon in the Oval Office” (The Washington Post).

“Four decades after Watergate shook America, journalist Bob Woodward returns to the scandal to profile Alexander Butterfield, the Richard Nixon aide who revealed the existence of the Oval Office tapes and effectively toppled the presidency…Woodward re-creates detailed scenes, which reveal the petty power plays of America’s most powerful men…a close-up view of the Oval Office in its darkest hour” (Kirkus Reviews). In The Last of the President’s Men, Woodward reveals the untold story based on forty-six hours of interviews with Butterfield, supported by thousands of documents—many of them original and not in the presidential archives and libraries—and uncovered new dimensions of Nixon’s secrets, obsessions, and deceptions.

“This volume…amplifies (rather than revises) the familiar, almost Miltonian portrait of the thirty-seventh president…as a brooding, duplicitous despot, obsessed with enemies and score-settling and not the least bit hesitant about lying to the public and breaking the law” (The New York Times). Today, The Last of the President’s Men could not be more timely and relevant as voters question how much do we know about those who are now seeking the presidency in 2016—what really drives them, how do they really make decisions, who do they surround themselves with, and what are their true political and personal values? This is “yet another fascinating gift to history by DC’s most relentless reporter” (Politico).


All the President’s Men
by Carl Bernstein, Bob Woodward

The 25th-anniversary edition of Bernstein and Woodward’s classic of investigative journalism.

In what must be the most devastating political detective story of the century, two young Washington Post reporters whose brilliant investigative journalism smashed the Watergate scandal wide open tell the whole behind-the-scenes drama the way it really happened.

The story begins with a burglary at Democratic National Committee headquarters on June 17, 1972. Bob Woodward, who was then working on the Washington Post’s District of Columbia staff, was called into the office on a Saturday morning to cover the story. Carl Bernstein, a Virginia political reporter on the Post, was also assigned. The two men soon learned that this was not a simple burglary.

Following lead after lead, Woodward and Bernstein picked up a trail of money, secrecy and high-level pressure that led to the Oval Office and implicated the men closest to Richard Nixon and then the President himself. Over the months, Woodward met secretly with Deep Throat, now perhaps America’s most famous still-anonymous source.

Here is the amazing story. From the first suspicions through the tortuous days of reporting and finally getting people to talk, the journalists were able to put the pieces of the puzzle together and produce the stories that won the Post a Pulitzer Prize. All the President’s Men is the inside story of how Bernstein and Woodward broke the story that brought about the President’s downfall. This is the reporting that changed the American presidency.


All the President’s Men
by Bob Woodward, Carl Bernstein

“The work that brought down a presidency…perhaps the most influential piece of journalism in history” (Time)—from Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, #1 New York Times bestselling authors of The Final Days.

The most devastating political detective story of the century: two Washington Post reporters, whose brilliant, Pulitzer Prize-winning investigation smashed the Watergate scandal wide open, tell the behind-the-scenes drama the way it really happened.

One of Time magazine’s All-Time 100 Best Nonfiction Books, this is the book that changed America. Published just months before President Nixon’s resignation, All the President’s Men revealed the full scope of the scandal and introduced for the first time the mysterious “Deep Throat.” Beginning with the story of a simple burglary at Democratic headquarters and then continuing through headline after headline, Bernstein and Woodward deliver a riveting firsthand account of their reporting. Their explosive reports won a Pulitzer Prize for The Washington Post, toppled the president, and have since inspired generations of reporters.

All the President’s Men is a riveting detective story, capturing the exhilarating rush of the biggest presidential scandal in US history as it unfolded in real time.


The Final Days
by Bob Woodward, Carl Bernstein

“An extraordinary work of reportage on the epic political story of our time” (Newsweek)—from Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, Pulitzer Prize-winning coauthors of All the President’s Men.

The Final Days is the #1 New York Times bestselling, classic, behind-the-scenes account of Richard Nixon’s dramatic last months as president. Moment by moment, Bernstein and Woodward portray the taut, post-Watergate White House as Nixon, his family, his staff, and many members of Congress strained desperately to prevent his inevitable resignation. This brilliant book reveals the ordeal of Nixon’s fall from office—one of the gravest crises in presidential history.


Shadow
by Bob Woodward

Twenty-five years after Richard Nixon’s resignation, investigative journalist Bob Woodward examines the legacy of Watergate. Based on hundreds of interviews – both on and off the record – and three years of research of government archives, Woodward’s latest book explains in detail how the premier scandal of US history has indelibly altered the shape of American politics and culture – and has limited the power to act of the presidency itself.

Bob Woodward’s mix of historical perspective and journalistic sleuthing provides a unique perspective on the repercussions of Watergate and proves that it was far more than a passing, embarrassing crisis in American politics: it heralded the beginning of a new period of troubled presidencies. From Ford through to Clinton, presidents have battled public scepticism, a challenging Congress, adversarial press and even special prosecutors in their term in office. Now, a quarter of a century after the scandal emerged, the man who helped expose Watergate shows us the stunning impact of its heritage.


One of the Presidents’ Men
by Maurice H. Stans

“This is the Horatio Alger-like story of a country boy with only a partial college education who rose to cabinet level in two presidential administrations – and whose brilliant reputation was forever tarnished by false accusations about his Watergate role. One of the Presidents’ Men chronicles Maurice H. Stans’s astonishing career.” “Stans takes us inside the halls of Washington power as he describes his twenty years working with presidents Eisenhower and Nixon. He provides new views of these two very different men, of their motives, their strengths, and failings, and of the men who aided and betrayed them. And, for the first time, we learn how John and Robert Kennedy abused their power to hound Stans out of a position in banking simply because he helped Republicans effectively criticize the Kennedy budget.” “Perhaps most important, we get this decent man’s story of what really happened in Watergate. We see him falsely accused and unjustly treated in the savage world of Washington politics, where rumor and innuendo replace fairness and justice. His is a prime case of how the media, power-hungry politicians, and special prosecutors can gang up to create an image of guilt, even if charges cannot hold up in court. The Watergate frenzy engulfed Stans and damaged his hard-earned reputation as an honorable man proud to serve his country. Not until a major 1992 story in The Washington Post were the Watergate accusations publicly acknowledged as false. As he tells his side of this story, Stans warns against a continuing Washington climate in which partisanship and headline hunting can hurt good people not able to defend themselves.”–BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Nixon at the Movies
by Mark Feeney

Was it an omen? Richard Nixon and the film industry arrived in Southern California in the same year, 1913. As Mark Feeney relates in this unusual and unusually absorbing book, Nixon and the movies have shared a long and complex history. Some of that history—the president’s multiple screenings of Patton before and during the invasion of Cambodia, or Oliver Stone’s Nixon—is well known. Yet much more is not. How many are aware, for example, that Nixon was an enthusiastic filmgoer who watched more than five hundred movies during his presidency?

Nixon at the Movies takes a new and often revelatory approach to looking at Nixon’s career—and Hollywood’s. From the obvious (All the President’s Men) to the less so (Elvis Presley movies and Nixon’s relationship to ’60s youth culture) to several onscreen “alternate” Nixons (Fred MacMurray in Double Indemnity, Tony Curtis in The Sweet Smell of Success, Gene Hackman in The Conversation), Feeney sees aspects of Nixon’s character, and the nation’s, refracted and reimagined in film. Conversely, Feeney argues that Nixon can help us see the movies in a new light, making a strong case for Nixon as the movies’ tutelary deity during the early ’70s, playing a role in Hollywood’s Silver Age comparable to FDR’s during its Golden Age.

Stylishly written and bracingly eclectic, Nixon at the Movies draws on biography, politics, cultural history, and film criticism to show just how deeply in the twentieth-century American grain lies the pair of seemingly incongruous nouns in its title. As Nixon once remarked to Garry Wills: “Isn’t that a hell of a thing, that the fate of a great country can depend on camera angles?”


Fear
by Bob Woodward

“Explosive.”—The Washington Post
“Devastating.”—The New Yorker
“Unprecedented.”—CNN

THE INSIDE STORY ON PRESIDENT TRUMP, AS ONLY BOB WOODWARD CAN TELL IT

With authoritative reporting honed through eight presidencies from Nixon to Obama, author Bob Woodward reveals in unprecedented detail the harrowing life inside President Donald Trump’s White House and precisely how he makes decisions on major foreign and domestic policies. Woodward draws from hundreds of hours of interviews with firsthand sources, meeting notes, personal diaries, files and documents. The focus is on the explosive debates and the decision-making in the Oval Office, the Situation Room, Air Force One and the White House residence.

Fear is the most intimate portrait of a sitting president ever published during the president’s first years in office.


Let Me Be Frank With You
by Richard Ford

A quartet of masterful novellas that returns Richard Ford to the territory that sealed his reputation as an American master: the life of Frank Bascombe, hero of his Pulitzer Prize–winning novel Independence Day.

Richard Ford introduced the world to his protean literary everyman, Frank Bascombe, aspiring novelist turned sportswriter turned real estate agent, in his 1986 masterpiece The Sportswriter. A lapidary account of the textures, sorrows and pleasures of one man’s ordinary life, it laid the groundwork for the Pulitzer Prize–winning Independence Day, published in 1996, followed by the last novel in the Bascombe trilogy, The Lay of the Land, published in 2006. Over a period of twenty years, the Bascombe novels deepened a portrait of one of the most unforgettable characters in American fiction, and in so doing gave readers an indelible portrait of America. Now in Let Me Be Frank With You, Ford returns to the territory that established him as an Updike for the contemporary era, in a quartet of novella-length Bascombe stories, set in in the aftermath and amid the calamitous circumstances of Hurricane Sandy.

Of revisiting Bascombe, Ford says, “What draws me to writing Frank Bascombe is what’s always drawn me: he’s funny (and it’s thrilling to write things that are funny), but also he offers me the chance to write into the breach between what Henry James calls ‘bliss and bale’; in my own way, to connect ‘the things that help and the things that hurt’ and to find some kind of reconciling vocabulary for both. I always think that, when I’m writing Frank Bascombe, I have the chance to write about the most important things I know, and that’s always been irresistible.”

A moving, peerlessly funny odyssey through America and through the layered consciousness of one of its most compelling literary incarnations, the four stories in Let Me Be Frank With You bear Bascombe’s unmistakable and now-famous imprint: a comic sensibility at odds with the minutiae of everyday human dismay and bewilderment; a plain-spoken acuity penetrating and expressing the shared wonder of modern existence; and a mordant relish and caution for all things American.


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Brethren

The Brethren
by Bob Woodward, Scott Armstrong

The Brethren is the first detailed behind-the-scenes account of the Supreme Court in action.

Bob Woodward and Scott Armstrong have pierced its secrecy to give us an unprecedented view of the Chief and Associate Justices—maneuvering, arguing, politicking, compromising, and making decisions that affect every major area of American life.


The Brethren
by John Grisham

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

They call themselves the Brethren: three disgraced former judges doing time in a Florida federal prison. One was sent up for tax evasion. Another, for skimming bingo profits. The third for a career-ending drunken joyride. Meeting daily in the prison law library, taking exercise walks in their boxer shorts, these judges-turned-felons can reminisce about old court cases, dispense a little jailhouse justice, and contemplate where their lives went wrong. Or they can use their time in prison to get very rich—very fast.

And so they sit, sprawled in the prison library, furiously writing letters, fine-tuning a wickedly brilliant extortion scam—while events outside their prison walls begin to erupt. A bizarre presidential election is holding the nation in its grips, and a powerful government figure is pulling some very hidden strings. For the Brethren, the timing couldn’t be better. Because they’ve just found the perfect victim.

BONUS: This edition includes an excerpt from John Grisham’s The Litigators.


Brethren
by Robyn Young

An international bestseller certain to appeal to fans of The Last Templar?the thrilling first book in a sweeping medieval trilogy

On the eve of the last Crusade, two men?s destinies will come together as two great civilizations go to war. Amidst conspiracy and intrigue in Europe, Will Campbell, a young knight, risks his life to recover the stolen Book of the Grail. Hidden within its pages are the heretical plans of a secret society within the Knights Templar. Meanwhile, the former slave Baybars Bundukdari and his army have taken over Egypt and Syria, and are planning a new Holy War to bring the Crusaders to their knees.

With breathtaking battle scenes, memorable characters, and a riveting mystery at its center, Brethren (being published simultaneously with book two, Crusade, in hardcover) is a heart-stopping historical drama that brings the Middle Ages vividly to life.


History of the Church of the Brethren of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania
by Church of the Brethren. Eastern District of Pennsylvania

Committee: S. R. Zug, John Herr, G. N. Falkenstein, J. G. Francis and D. C. Reber.

Brethren of the Net
by Willis Conner Sorensen

Sorensen asks how it came about that, within the span of forty years, the American entomological community developed from a few gentlemen naturalists with primary links to Europe to a thriving scientific community exercising world leadership in entomological science. He investigates the relationship between American and European entomology, the background of American entomologists, the implications of entomological theory, and the specific links between 19th-century American society and the rapid institutional growth and advances in theoretical and applied entomology.

By the 1880s the entomologists constituted the largest single group of American zoologists and the largest group of ecologists in the world. While rooted in the British natural history tradition, these individuals developed a distinctive American style of entomological investigation. Inspired by the concept of the balance of nature, they excelled in field investigations of North American insects with special emphasis on insect pests that threatened crop production in a market-oriented agriculture. During this period, entomologists described over ten times as many North American insect species as had been previously named, and they consolidated their findings in definitive collections. Employing evolutionary theory, they contributed to the growing understanding of insect migration, mimicry, seasonal dimorphism, and the symbiotic relationship of plant and animal species. Americans also led in the revision of insect taxonomy according to the new principles. Their employment of entomological findings in the practical control of agricultural pests set new standards worldwide. Initially ridiculed as eccentric bug hunters, American entomologists eventually achieved stature as agricultural advisers and as investigators into the origin and nature of life.

Based primarily on the correspondence of American entomologists, Brethren of the Net draws together information from diverse sources to illuminate an important chapter in the history of American science.