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Moon And Sixpence

The Moon and Sixpence
by W. Somerset Maugham

"Witty, compelling." — The Boston Globe. Gripped by an overwhelming obsession, Charles Strickland, a conventional London stockbroker, decides in midlife to desert his wife, family, business, and civilization for his art. One of Maugham’s most popular works, The Moon and Sixpence is a riveting story about an uncompromising and self-destructive man who forsakes wealth and comfort to pursue the life of a painter. Drifting from Paris to Marseilles, Strickland eventually settles in Tahiti, takes a mistress, and in spite of poverty and a long, terminal illness, produces his most passionate and mysterious works of art.
Loosely based on the life of Paul Gauguin, Maugham’s timeless masterpiece is storytelling at its best — an insightful work focusing on artistic fixation that propels the artist beyond the commonplace into the selfish realm of genius.

The Moon and Sixpence
by W. Somerset Maugham

The Moon and Sixpence is a fictional novel heavily influenced by the life of French painter Paul Gauguin. The novel is told first-person, dipping episodically into the mind of the artist. Charles Strickland is an English stock broker, who leaves everything behind him in his middle age to live in defiant squalor in Paris as an artist. His genius is eventually recognized by a Dutch painter.

The Moon and Sixpence
by William Somerset Maugham

This title tells the story of Charles Strickland, a conventional stockbroker who abandons his wife and children for Prais and Tahiti, to live his life as a painter. Whilst his betrayal of family, duty and honour gives him the freedom to achieve greatness, his decision leads to an obsession which carries severe implications.

The Moon and Sixpence
by William Somerset Maugham

Based closely on the life of the French painter Paul Gauguin. It tells of Charles Strickland, a stock broker who deserts his wife, family, and business in order to live and paint in Tahiti.

The Moon and Sixpence: One Man’s Journey Across the Field of Art and into Its Depths (Based on Paul Gauguin’s Life)
by William Somerset Maugham

This carefully crafted ebook: "The Moon and Sixpence: One Man’s Journey Across the Field of Art and into Its Depths (Based on Paul Gauguin’s Life)" is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. The Moon and Sixpence is a novel by W Somerset Maugham, told in episodic form by a first-person narrator, in a series of glimpses into the mind and soul of the central character Charles Strickland, a middle-aged English stockbroker, who abandons his wife and children abruptly to pursue his desire to become an artist. It is based on the life of the painter Paul Gauguin. William Somerset Maugham (1874–1965) was a British playwright, novelist and short story writer. He was among the most popular writers of his era and reputedly the highest paid author during the 1930s.

The Moon and Sixpence
by W. Somerset Maugham

This Squid Ink Classic includes the full text of the work plus MLA style citations for scholarly secondary sources, peer-reviewed journal articles and critical essays for when your teacher requires extra resources in MLA format for your research paper.

The Modern Eye: Literature and the Art Aesthetics – “The Moon and Sixpence”
by Marcio Hemerique Pereira

Essay from the year 2011 in the subject English – Literature, Works, grade: A, Birkbeck, University of London (Humanities), course: Modernist Literature and Modern Art, language: English, abstract: Only few contemporary authors have been praised as highly and condemned as completely as W. Somerset Maugham. The present essay discusses Maugham’s novel ‘The Moon and Sixpence.’ My concerns lay on key questions that I try to explore. First and foremost, what do we learn about the presentation of the early twentieth century artist from Maugham? Are, in fact, artistic techniques used in the literary portrait (depictions) of the artist? What do we learn about modern art from the text? Why is Maugham writing about an artist? How can literature depict artist and artistic processes? Now I propose to attempt at least to suggest the reasons for, if not to reconcile, opinions as widely different as the ones presented further in the essay and, at the same time, to offer a less impetuous and more carefully substantiated criticism of Maugham’s fictional work, ‘The Moon and Sixpence.’

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Selected Short Stories

Selected Short Stories (Dual-Language)
by Honoré de Balzac

Considered a founder of the realistic school of fiction, prolific French novelist Honoré de Balzac (1799–1850) wrote in meticulous detail, depicting ordinary and undistinguished lives in tales that nevertheless abounded in melodramatic plots and violent passions.
This convenient dual-language volume includes six of Balzac’s most highly regarded short stories: "An Episode During the Terror," a deftly told tale contrasting material poverty with spiritual riches; "A Passion in the Desert," inspired by Balzac’s interest in the Near East and his fascination with Napoleon; "The Revolutionary Conscript," a critique of provincial life; "The Forsaken Woman," an intriguing study of female psychology and a how-to seduction manual; "The Unknown Masterpiece," which focuses on the conflict between an artist’s commitment to his work and his relationship with the woman who loves him; and "Facino Cane," a tale of a destitute blind man’s dreams of restoring his former wealth and power.
Stanley Appelbaum has provided excellent, line-for-line English translations of the text, as well as an informative introduction and notes related to each story. This superb selection of tales by one of the world’s great writers of fiction is sure to delight students and devotees of French language and literature.

Contes Choisis
by Honoré de Balzac

Considered a founder of the realistic school of fiction, prolific French novelist Honoré de Balzac (1799–1850) wrote in meticulous detail, depicting ordinary and undistinguished lives in tales that nevertheless abounded in melodramatic plots and violent passions.
This convenient dual-language volume includes six of Balzac’s most highly regarded short stories: "An Episode During the Terror," a deftly told tale contrasting material poverty with spiritual riches; "A Passion in the Desert," inspired by Balzac’s interest in the Near East and his fascination with Napoleon; "The Revolutionary Conscript," a critique of provincial life; "The Forsaken Woman," an intriguing study of female psychology and a how-to seduction manual; "The Unknown Masterpiece," which focuses on the conflict between an artist’s commitment to his work and his relationship with the woman who loves him; and "Facino Cane," a tale of a destitute blind man’s dreams of restoring his former wealth and power.
Stanley Appelbaum has provided excellent, line-for-line English translations of the text, as well as an informative introduction and notes related to each story. This superb selection of tales by one of the world’s great writers of fiction is sure to delight students and devotees of French language and literature.

Selected Short Stories (Dual-Language)
by Honoré de Balzac

Considered a founder of the realistic school of fiction, prolific French novelist Honoré de Balzac (1799–1850) wrote in meticulous detail, depicting ordinary and undistinguished lives in tales that nevertheless abounded in melodramatic plots and violent passions.
This convenient dual-language volume includes six of Balzac’s most highly regarded short stories: "An Episode During the Terror," a deftly told tale contrasting material poverty with spiritual riches; "A Passion in the Desert," inspired by Balzac’s interest in the Near East and his fascination with Napoleon; "The Revolutionary Conscript," a critique of provincial life; "The Forsaken Woman," an intriguing study of female psychology and a how-to seduction manual; "The Unknown Masterpiece," which focuses on the conflict between an artist’s commitment to his work and his relationship with the woman who loves him; and "Facino Cane," a tale of a destitute blind man’s dreams of restoring his former wealth and power.
Stanley Appelbaum has provided excellent, line-for-line English translations of the text, as well as an informative introduction and notes related to each story. This superb selection of tales by one of the world’s great writers of fiction is sure to delight students and devotees of French language and literature.

Selected Short Stories
by Rabindranath Tagore

Poet, novelist, painter and musician, Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941) is the grand master of Bengali culture. Written during the 1890s, the stories in this selection brilliantly recreate vivid images of Bengali life and landscapes in their depiction of peasantry and gentry, casteism, corrupt officialdom and dehumanizing poverty. Yet Tagore is first and foremost India’s supreme Romantic poet, and in these stories he can be seen reaching beyond mere documentary realism towards his own profoundly original vision.

Selected Short Stories
by Virginia Woolf

‘Why, if one wants to compare life to anything, one must liken it to being blown through the Tube at fifty miles an hour – landing at the other end without a single hairpin in one’s hair! Shot out at the feet of God entirely naked! … Yes, that seems to express the rapidity of life, the perpetual waste and repair; all so casual, all so haphazard’

Virginia Woolf tested the boundaries of fiction in these short stories, developing a new language of sensation, feeling and thought, and recreating in words the ‘swarm and confusion of life’. Defying categorization, the stories range from the more traditional narrative style of ‘Solid Objects’ through the fragile impressionism of ‘Kew Gardens’ to the abstract exploration of consciousness in ‘The Mark on the Wall’.

Edited with an introduction and notes by Sandra Kemp


Selected Short Stories
by D. H. Lawrence

Seven of the best Lawrence stories, each turning on some facet of sexual feeling, attitude, or convention. "The Prussian Officer" focuses on an aristocratic captain’s homoerotic obsession for his young orderly. "The Shadow in the Rose Garden" and "The White Stocking" deal with sexual jealousy. "Daughters of the Vicar" brilliantly describes two exceedingly class-conscious mating rituals. "The Christening," "Second Best" and "Odour of Chrysanthemums" etch memorable portraits of a family’s shame at an illegitimate birth, a country courtship, and a brutish marriage abbreviated by death. Note.

Selected Short Stories
by William Faulkner

William Faulkner was a master of the short story. Most of the pieces in this collection are drawn from the greatest period in his writing life, the fifteen or so years beginning in 1929, when he published The Sound and the Fury. They explore many of the themes found in the novels and feature characters of small-town Mississippi life that are uniquely Faulkner’s.

In “A Rose for Emily,” the first of his stories to appear in a national magazine, a straightforward, neighborly narrator relates a tale of love, betrayal, and murder. The vicious family of the Snopes trilogy turns up in “Barn Burning,” about a son’s response to the activities of his arsonist father. And Jason and Caddy Compson, two other inhabitants of Faulkner’s mythical Yoknapatawpha County, are witnesses to the terrorizing of a pregnant black laundress in “That Evening Sun.” These and the other stories gathered here attest to the fact that Faulkner is, as Ralph Ellison so aptly noted, “the greatest artist the South has produced.”


Selected Short Stories
by Guy de Maupassant

A collection of the author’s most characteristic stories portrays life in 19th-century France.

Selected Short Stories
by Joseph Conrad

Chosenand Introduced by Dr Keith Carabine, University of Kent at Canterbury and Chairperson of the Joseph Conrad Society of Great Britain.

This specially commissioned selection of Conrad’s short stories includes favourites such as Youth, a modern epic of the sea; The Secret Sharer, a thrilling psychological drama; An Outpost of Progress, a blackly comic prelude to Heart of Darkness; Amy Foster, a moving story of a shipwrecked, alienated Pole; and The Lagoon and Karain, two exotic, exciting Malay tales. Il Conde and The Tale are subtle portrayals of bewildered outrage; An Anarchist and The Informer are sardonic depictions of revolutionaries; and Prince Roman is a tale of magnificent, doomed heroism set in Conrad’s native Poland during the Uprising of 1831. Both those new to Conrad’s work and those familiar with his novels will delight in this wide-ranging collection.

This collection also includes Conrad’s last novel, The Rover.


Selected Short Stories of Weldon Kees
by Weldon Kees

By the age of thirty, Weldon Kees (1914?55) was a poet, journalist, musician, painter, photographer, and short story writer living in New York City. Despite a contract for aøforthcoming novel, however, he stopped writing fiction, moved to San Francisco, and worked as an artist and filmmaker. On July 18, 1955, his car was found on the Golden Gate Bridge, and he has not been seen since.

These stories by Kees, predominantly set in Depression-era mid-America, feature bleak, realistic settings and characters resigned to their meager lives. The owner of an auto parts store occasionally "sells" his sister Betty Lou to interested patrons; a cryptic message in library books indicates the yearnings of a silenced patron; a young woman taking tickets at the Roseland Gardens futilely dreams of escape from the future she sees for herself; and an old man carefully saves his money to fulfill the requirements of a chain letter only to be disappointed by a spiteful daughter-in-law. Many of these stories are set in the Nebraska of Kees’s youth, and they are written from a Midwestern sensibility: keenly observant, darkly humorous, and absurdly fantastic.

In this new edition, Dana Gioia has added three stories to the fourteen gathered in the first edition, The Ceremony and Other Stories. The New York Times named that first edition, published in 1984, a notable book of the year.


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World’s Greatest Short Stories

The World’s Greatest Short Stories
by James Daley

Wonderfully wide-ranging and enjoyable, this outstanding collection features short stories by great nineteenth- and twentieth-century writers from America, the United Kingdom, Ireland, and Western Europe.
Included are Hemingway’s "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place," in which two waiters and a lonely customer in a Spanish cafe confront the concept of nothingness; "A & P," John Updike’s most anthologized story and one of his most popular; "Borges and I," typical Jorge Luis Borges — imaginative, philosophical, and mysterious; as well as short masterpieces by Leo Tolstoy, Anton Chekhov, Herman Melville, Thomas Mann, Guy de Maupassant, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, D. H. Lawrence, and ten other great writers.
Prime examples of the classic short story, these enduring literary treasures will be invaluable to students and teachers as well as to anyone who appreciates the finely turned tale.

The World’s Greatest Short Stories
by James Daley

Wonderfully wide-ranging and enjoyable, this outstanding collection features short stories by great 19- and 20th-century writers from America, the United Kingdom, Ireland, and Western Europe.
Included are Hemingway’s “A Clean, Well-Lighted Place,” in which two waiters and a lonely customer in a Spanish cafe confront the concept of nothingness; “A & P,” John Updike’s most anthologized story and one of his most popular; “Borges and I,” typical Jorge Luis Borges — imaginative, philosophical, and mysterious; as well as short masterpieces by Leo Tolstoy, Anton Chekhov, Herman Melville, Thomas Mann, Guy de Maupassant, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, D. H. Lawrence, and ten other great writers.
Prime examples of the classic short story, these enduring literary treasures will be invaluable to students and teachers as well as to anyone who appreciates the finely turned tale.

The Greatest Short Stories of Leo Tolstoy
by Leo Tolstoy, General Press

Wonderfully wide-ranging and enjoyable, this outstanding collection features highly acclaimed short stories by Tolstoy who is regarded as one of the greatest writers in history.

Among Russian writers, Leo Tolstoy is probably the best known to the Western world, largely because of War and Peace, his epic in prose, and Anna Karenina, one of the most splendid novels in any language. But during his long lifetime, Tolstoy also wrote enough shorter works to fill many volumes.

The seven parts into which this book is divided include ‘God Sees the Truth, but Waits’ and ‘A Prisoner in the Caucasus’ which Tolstoy himself considered as his best. ‘How Much Land Does a Man Need?’ depicting the greed of a peasant for land; the most brilliantly told parable, ‘Ivan the Fool’—these are all contained in this volume. The book includes an active table of contents for easy navigation.

CONTENTS:
PART 1 : FOLK-TALES RETOLD
1. The Godson
2. The Empty Drum
3. How Much Land does a Man Need?
4. The Repentant Sinner
5. The Three Hermits
6. A Grain as Big as a Hen’s Egg
7. The Imp and the Crust

PART 2 : ADAPTATIONS FROM THE FRENCH
8. Too Dear!
9. The Coffee-House of Surat

PART 3 : TALES FOR CHILDREN
10. A Prisoner in the Caucasus
11. The Bear-Hunt
12. God Sees the Truth, but Waits

PART 4 : A FAIRY TALE
13. The Story of Iván the Fool

PART 5 : STORIES GIVEN TO AID THE PERSECUTED JEWS
14. Work, Death and Sickness
15. Esarhaddon, King of Assyria
16. Three Questions

PART 6 : STORIES WRITTEN TO PICTURES
17. Ilyás
18. Evil Allures, but Good Endures
19. Little Girls Wiser than Men

PART 7 : POPULAR STORIES
20. A Spark Neglected Burns the House
21. Two Old Men
22. Where Love is, God is
23. What Men Live by

Publisher : General Press


50 Great American Short Stories
by Milton Crane

The Adventure of the German Student – Young Goodman Brown – Ms. Found in a Bottle – The Fiddler – What was it? – Luck – The Outcasts of Poker Flat – The Damned Thing – The Two Faces – A New England Nun – The Courting of Sister Wisby – The Dilettante – Masters of Arts – Effie Whittles – Mr. Dooley on the Popularity of Firemen – The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky – A Dead Issue – The Lost Phoebe – Father is Firm with his Ailments – Death in the Woods – To Build a Fire – The Use of Force – Old Folks’ Christmas – Silent Snow, Secret Snow – By the Waters of Babylon – Soldiers of the Republic – Mr. Preble Gets Rid of his Wife – Cluney Mc Farrar’s Hardtack – The Darkness of the Night – The Old People – Grapes for Monsieur Cape – A Man of the World – The Hour of Letdown – The Resting Place – The Touch of Nutmeg Makes it – The Harness – Friend of the Family – The Rumor – There was a Young Lady of Perth – The Downfall of Fascism in Black Ankle County – The French Scarecrow – The Blue-Winged Teal – The Archimandrite’s Niece – A Mother’s Tale – The National Pastime – The Girls in Their Summer Dresses – The Death of Shorty – Grandma and the Hindu Monk- Madame Zilensky and the King of Finland – The Lucid Eye in Silver Town – Selected Bibliography .

Short shorts
by Irving Howe, Ilana Wiener Howe

Collects a variety of stories, which are each no longer than eight pages, by authors, including James Thurber, Doris Lessing, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and Leo Tolstoy

A Selection from the World’s Greatest Short Stories, Illustrative of the History of Short Story Writing
by Sherwin Cody

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.

This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.

As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.


World’s Best Short Stories
by Various

A selection of timeless masterpieces from Charles Dickens Edgar Allan Poe William Thackeray Rudyard Kipling and many more

World’s Best Short Stories is a collection of captivating tales from around the world, penned by some of the greatest storytellers of all time. 

Featuring pioneers of the short-story genre, this book promises to entertain you in many different ways. Be it the intellectual but endlessly fun The Gold-Bug by Edgar Allan Poe, or even the enduringly brilliant Aladdin from the Arabian Nights, every story has a unique charm. Also included are the ever-popular A Christmas Carol by master storyteller Charles Dickens and Rip Van Winkle by Washington Irving. 

Presenting masterpieces of literature by the likes of Rudyard Kipling, William M. Thackeray, Guy de Maupassant, Nathaniel Hawthorne and J. M. Barrie, this edition belongs in every avid reader’s personal collection.


Chekhov
by Anton Chekhov

The Restless Classics edition of Chekhov: Stories for Our Time presents a must-have collection by the great Russian author who captured humanity in all its complexity, and reintroduces Chekhov as a playful, deeply human, and thoroughly modern writer.

The great 19th-century Russian author and playwright Anton Chekhov wrote nearly one thousand stories, a body of work that is unmatched in its alchemy of sensitivity, wisdom, precision, and verve. Chekhov’s sensibility was radically human and thoroughly modern: write not how you think things should be, but rather as they are. Universally recognized as one of the greatest short story writers of all time, he revolutionized the form and had a profound influence on his successors, from Flannery O’Connor to Alice Munro.

As the celebrated Russian-immigrant author Boris Fishman writes in his delightfully counterintuitive introduction to this Restless Classics collection, Chekhov is funny, ceaselessly curious, and undogmatic—a significant break from the bleak and morally rigid tradition of his contemporaries Dostoevsky and Tolstoy. Unlike those peers born to privilege, Chekhov was raised in the peasantry and worked as a doctor. In his writing, he portrays the complexity of human beings as changeable and contingent, neither saints nor sinners—an approach intimately linked with his work as a clinician and humanitarian.

Chekhov’s humanity, just as much as his mastery of the writing craft, is potent medicine in times that seem so divided by ideology and antipathy for groups seen as “other.” The first new selection of his work in over a decade, the Restless Classics edition of Chekhov: Stories for Our Time pairs beloved favorites with lesser known gems, all stunningly illustrated by Matt McCann: a perfect introduction for novices and a must-have for Chekhov devotees.