Posted on

Justice

Generous Justice
by Timothy Keller

Renowned pastor and bestselling author of The Prodigal Prophet Timothy Keller shares his most provocative and illuminating message yet. 

It is commonly thought in secular society that the Bible is one of the greatest hindrances to doing justice. Isn’t it full of regressive views? Didn’t it condone slavery? Why look to the Bible for guidance on how to have a more just society? But Timothy Keller challenges these preconceived beliefs and presents the Bible as a fundamental source for promoting justice and compassion for those in need. In Generous Justice, he explores a life of justice empowered by an experience of grace: a generous, gracious justice. This book offers readers a new understanding of modern justice and human rights that will resonate with both the faithful and the skeptical.



Justice
by Harry Brighouse

Justice is a concise and accessible introduction to the central theories of justice in contemporary political theory. The book aims to provide readers with a clear understanding of the theories and the main objections to them, as well as showing how these theories engage with one another.

It offers detailed accounts of John Rawls’s theory of justice as fairness; the alternative ‘capabilities approach’ developed by Nobel-prize winning economist Amartya Sen; the libertarian theories of Milton Friedman and Robert Nozick; the ‘group-rights’ based theory of Will Kymlicka; and Nancy Fraser’s theory of participatory parity. The book also includes extensive discussions of the nature and purpose of political theorizing, and it asks whether theories of justice should take only social institutions as their subject, or should also comment on personal motivations and behaviour.


Justice
by Dan Mahoney

New York City. A wealthy businessman meets a violent fate in his elegant, carefully-secured home in Queens. Two drug dealers are murdered in a Brooklyn no-tell motel room. Several men are found riddled with bullets and nails on a little-traveled road beneath FDR Drive. And soon thereafter, a church, a synagogue, and a mosque find bags of cash waiting at their doorsteps-all from a vigilante who signs himself “Justice.”

NYPD Detective First Grade Brian McKenna and his partner, Cisco Sanchez (the self-described world’s greatest detective), are assigned to find the elusive killer that all of New York City is rooting for, a man of supreme technical skills, physical power, and intelligence, who always seems to know every move the police will make before they make it. Justice is executing drug dealers, helping the police close unsolved cases, providing those in need with stolen drug money, and creating a nightmare for the police commissioner, the mayor, and the two detectives.

As McKenna and Sanchez work to try and outsmart the vigilante and discover his next victim, they also must find out who is helping Justice in his quest for revenge.

Justice showcases fascinating investigative detail, wild action, and Dan Mahoney’s trademark humor in a terrific police thriller.


Justice
by Ronald L. Cohen

Ronald L. Cohen Justice is a central moral standard in social life. It is invoked in judging individual persons and in judging the basic structure of societies. It has been described as akin to a “human hunger or thirst” (Pascal, Pensees, cited in Hirschman, 1982, p. 91), “more powerful than any physical hunger, and endlessly resilient” (Pitkin, 1981, p. 349). The most prominent contemporary theory of justice proceeds from the claim that justice is “the first virtue of social institutions, as truth is systems of thought” (Rawls, 1971, p. 3). However, as the following chapters demonstrate, justice has a complex and controversial history. If, as has been claimed, justice is a central category of human thought and a central aspect of human motivation, can it also be the case that to invoke justice is no more than “banging on the table: an emotional expression which turns one’s demand into an absolute postulate” (Ross, 1959, p. 274)? If justice is the first virtue of social institutions, can the concept of social or economic justice at the same time be “entirely empty and meaningless” so that any attempt to employ it is “either thoughtless or fraudulent” (Hayek, 1976, pp. xi-xii)? In a formal sense, justice concerns ensuring that each person receives what she or he is due.

Pursuing Justice
by Ken Wytsma, David Jacobsen

The ONLY way to find abundant life and happiness is to give your life away.

If God designed us to experience true happiness and abundant life, why do so many Christians feel dissatisfied and purposeless? We try to make our lives better by chasing our own dreams, but that only makes the problem worse. Instead, the path to a just life that”s satisfying and permeated with meaning leads us alongside the orphan, the widow, and the powerless. Using clear evangelical theology and compelling narratives drawn from two decades of global ministry and travel, Ken Wytsma, the founder of The Justice Conference, shows God”s unchanging love for all His children. On the way, the author calls us back to a proper understanding of biblical justice, a redeeming glimpse into the true meaning of righteousness and the remarkable connection between our own joy, the joy of others, and the wondrous Gospel of Jesus Christ.

Pursuing Justice shows that God isn”t primarily concerned with personal piety but about empowering His children to do justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with their creator. The message is as hopeful as it is fresh: when you discover anew the meaning of the Gospel and give your life away, you will find it…and it will be the best life you can imagine.

First-time author Wytsma (with an assist from Jacobsen) is one of the new breed of evangelical Christians returning to scripture to redeem justice as a central tenet of faith…. Wytsma infuses his writing with fresh experiences from working with the millennial generation…. “Apathy tells us that it”s perfectly acceptable to live with illusions of our own justice,” he writes, neatly linking those concerns. This accessible guide provides trustworthy scriptural analysis, examples of contemporary justice issues…and a solid philosophy for understanding the role of justice in today”s society…. “Justice cannot be divorced from God”s heart and purposes,” he writes. “It permeates them.” Wytsma”s authorial voice is engaging, encouraging, and invitational. His humor helps the reader recognize her own humanity and transformative potential within the unfolding moral arc of the universe.

Publishers Weekly

“Justice has become trendy. Ken Wytsma”s Pursuing Justice avoids all the pitfalls of trendiness. It exhibits a deep and accurate understanding of the nature of justice. It is an eye-opener.”

–NICHOL AS WOLTERSTORFF, Noah Porter Professor Emeritus of Philosophical Theology, Yale University; Senior Research Fellow, Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture, University of Virginia

“Ken is a fresh voice of balance, humility, and collaboration. His enthusiasm is contagious and his challenge to the church to not only do justice, but to learn to do it well, is commendable.”

–KEITH WRIGHT, International President of Food for the Hungry

“Ken Wytsma”s Pursuing Justice will rattle you. Not since C. S. Lewis put down his pen have readers been so provoked to think. It will change the way you approach others.”

–KAREN SPEARS ZACHARIAS, Author ofA Silence of Mockingbirds and Will Jesus Buy Me a Double-Wide?

“Ken Wytsma not only brings us back to a biblical understanding of justice, but also humbly calls us to pursue it in practice. I was both enlightened and motivated.”

–RANDAL ROBERTS, President of Western Seminary, Portland, OR

“In Pursuing Justice, Ken is at the cutting edge of where God”s heart is. This book is timely and needs to be read by everyone in the church.”

–JOHN M . PERKINS, Civil Rights Leader, Founder of the Christian Community Development Association (CCDA), and Founder of The John Perkins Foundation for Reconciliation and Development


Justice as Fairness
by John Rawls, Professor John Rawls

This book originated as lectures for a course on political philosophy that Rawls taught regularly at Harvard in the 1980s. In time the lectures became a restatement of his theory of justice as fairness, revised in light of his more recent papers and his treatise Political Liberalism (1993). As Rawls writes in the preface, the restatement presents “in one place an account of justice as fairness as I now see it, drawing on all [my previous] works.” He offers a broad overview of his main lines of thought and also explores specific issues never before addressed in any of his writings.

Rawls is well aware that since the publication of A Theory of Justice in 1971, American society has moved farther away from the idea of justice as fairness. Yet his ideas retain their power and relevance to debates in a pluralistic society about the meaning and theoretical viability of liberalism. This book demonstrates that moral clarity can be achieved even when a collective commitment to justice is uncertain.


Obstruction of Justice
by Luke Rosiak

Investigative reporter Luke Rosiak is being hailed as “one of the smartest, most diligent reporters in Washington” (TUCKER CARLSON) and “a bulldog” (DANA LOESCH) for uncovering “what is possibly the largest scandal and coverup in the history of the United States House of Representatives” (NEWT GINGRICH).

It’s like something out of a spy novel: In the heat of the 2016 election, an unvetted Pakistani national with a proclivity for blackmail gained access to the computer files of one in five Democrats in the House of Representatives. He and his family lifted data off the House network, stole the identity of an intelligence specialist, and sent congressional electronic equipment to foreign officials. And that was only the beginning.

Rather than protect national security, Congress and the Justice Department schemed to cover up a politically inconvenient hack and an underlying fraud on Capitol Hill involving dozens of Democrats’ offices. Evidence disappeared, witnesses were threatened, and the supposed watchdogs in the media turned a blind eye.

Combining tenacious investigative reporting and high-tech investigative techniques, Luke Rosiak began ferreting out the truth, and found himself face to face with the “Deep State,” observing how Nancy Pelosi’s Democrats manipulated the Department of Justice, the media, and even Republican leadership to sabotage the investigation into what Newt Gingrich calls possibly the biggest congressional scandal in history.


Transitional Justice
by Ruti G. Teitel

At the century’s end, societies all over the world are throwing off the yoke of authoritarian rule and beginning to build democracies. At any such time of radical change, the question arises: should a society punish its ancien regime or let bygones be bygones? Transitional Justice takes this question to a new level with an interdisciplinary approach that challenges the very terms of the contemporary debate. Ruti Teitel explores the recurring dilemma of how regimes should respond to evil rule, arguing against the prevailing view favoring punishment, yet contending that the law nevertheless plays a profound role in periods of radical change. Pursuing a comparative and historical approach, she presents a compelling analysis of constitutional, legislative, and administrative responses to injustice following political upheaval. She proposes a new normative conception of justice–one that is highly politicized–offering glimmerings of the rule of law that, in her view, have become symbols of liberal transition. Its challenge to the prevailing assumptions about transitional periods makes this timely and provocative book essential reading for policymakers and scholars of revolution and new democracies.

What is Justice?
by Hans Kelsen

Originally published: Berkeley: University of California Press, 1957. [vi], 397 pp. Through the lens of science, Hans Kelsen proposes a dynamic theory of natural law, examines Platonic and Aristotelian doctrines of justice and the idea of justice as found in the holy scriptures. “You simply cannot get around this book if you want a real understanding of the fundamental ideas on which the great work of Kelsen is built. Reading this volume you may once more admire the transparent clarity of style and the merciless consistency of reasoning which are well known qualities of this author.” — Alf Ross, 45 California Law Review 564 1957. Possibly the most influential jurisprudent of the twentieth century, Hans Kelsen [1881-1973] was legal adviser to Austria’s last emperor and its first republican government, the founder and permanent advisor of the Supreme Constitutional Court of Austria, and the author of Austria’s Constitution, which was enacted in 1920, abolished during the Anschluss, and restored in 1945. He was the author of more than forty books on law and legal philosophy. Active as a teacher in Europe and the United States, he was Dean of the Law Faculty of the University of Vienna and taught at the universities of Cologne and Prague, the Institute of International Studies in Geneva, Harvard, Wellesley, the University of California at Berkeley, and the Naval War College.

Posted on

Numbers Behind Numb3Rs

The Numbers Behind NUMB3RS
by Keith J. Devlin, Gary Lorden

The companion to the hit CBS crime series Numb3rs presents the fascinating way mathematics is used to fight real-life crime

Using the popular CBS prime-time TV crime series Numb3rs as a springboard, Keith Devlin (known to millions of NPR listeners as ?the Math Guy? on NPR?s Weekend Edition with Scott Simon) and Gary Lorden (the principal math advisor to Numb3rs) explain real-life mathematical techniques used by the FBI and other law enforcement agencies to catch and convict criminals. From forensics to counterterrorism, the Riemann hypothesis to image enhancement, solving murders to beating casinos, Devlin and Lorden present compelling cases that illustrate how advanced mathematics can be used in state-of-the-art criminal investigations.


The Numbers Behind NUMB3RS
by Keith Devlin, Gary Lorden

The companion to the hit CBS crime series Numb3rs presents the fascinating way mathematics is used to fight real-life crime

Using the popular CBS prime-time TV crime series Numb3rs as a springboard, Keith Devlin (known to millions of NPR listeners as the Math Guy on NPR’s Weekend Edition with Scott Simon) and Gary Lorden (the principal math advisor to Numb3rs) explain real-life mathematical techniques used by the FBI and other law enforcement agencies to catch and convict criminals. From forensics to counterterrorism, the Riemann hypothesis to image enhancement, solving murders to beating casinos, Devlin and Lorden present compelling cases that illustrate how advanced mathematics can be used in state-of-the-art criminal investigations.


Charlie Numbers and the Man in the Moon
by Ben Mezrich, Tonya Mezrich

Charlie is recruited to use his mathematical prowess to discover what happened to a box of stolen moon rocks in this follow up to Bringing Down the Mouse.

The Kid: Charlie Lewis, a.k.a. Numbers. The smartest kids in sixth grade. Charlie sees the world as a series of math problems—ones that can be solved, if you know the right equations.

The Team: The Whiz Kids. Charlie’s best friends are joining him undercover to recover missing moon rocks, which have disappeared from NASA’s vaults.

The Target: Aerospace Infinity, the company owned by former astronaut Buzz Caldwell and hosting organization of the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum’s paper airplane contest. Working together, the Whiz Kids must master the principles of aerodynamics, wind science, and gravity to win the contest to get closer to their target.

The Catch: Nothing is ever as it seems, and Charlie suspects the mission is being led by someone who isn’t what she claims to be. And messing with the government could jeopardize their futures…


Mathematics and the Search for Knowledge
by Morris Kline

Mad River Road:After spending a year in prison, Ralph Fisher has explicit plans for his first night of freedom: tonight, someone will be held accountable. He goes to murderous lengths to obtain the address of his former wife – the woman he blames for his fate and against whom he has sworn vengeance. Determined to bring her to his idea of justice, Ralph’s next step is to travel from Florida’s sandy beaches to Dayton, Ohio, where his ex-wife is struggling to make ends meet on Mad River Road.Also in Florida, Jamie Kellogg wakes from an agonizing nightmare of her mother’s funeral, and assesses her life: a pretty but unaccomplished twenty-nine-year-old woman in a dead-end job, with an ex-husband in Atlanta, a married lover in the hospital, and a virtual stranger in her bed. But this stranger is everything the previous men in her life weren’t: tender, attentive, and adventurous. After convincing Jamie to quit her miserable job and ditch her judgmental, perfectionist sister, he proposes a romantic getaway. While Jamie wonders if this thrilling man might finally be her Prince Charming, they plan a road trip to visit his son, who lives with his mother on a street called Mad River Road…Heartstopper:Welcome to Torrance, Florida. Population: 4,160. As Sheriff John Weber would attest, the deadliest predators to date in his tiny hamlet were the alligators lurking in the nearby swamps. But that was before someone abducted and murdered a runaway teenage girl…and before the disappearance of popular and pretty Liana Martin. The pattern is chilling to Sandy Crosbie, the town’s new high school English teacher. With a marriage on the rocks, thanks to her husband’s online affairs, and a beautiful teenage daughter to protect, Sandy wishes she’d never come to the seemingly quiet town with shocking depths of scandal, sex, and brutality roiling beneath its surface. And as Sheriff Weber digs up more questions than answers in a dead-end investigation, one truth emerges: the prettiest ones are being targeted, the heartstoppers. And this killer intends to give them their due….Alternating between the chilling journal entries of a cold-blooded murderer and the sizzling scandals of small-town life, Heartstopper is Joy Fielding’s most exciting novel of suspense yet.

Retire the Colors
by Dario DiBattista

The impact of war, and the lingering aftereffect it has on both veterans and civilians, is—for myriad reasons—largely invisible to the public. Popular media may create news cycles around horrors or stereotypes, but the effort required to redefine and sustain “normal” lives after war stays below the surface and out of sight. In Retire the Colors, nineteen thought-provoking stories by veterans and civilians consider the residual effects of Iraq and Afghanistan. A pacifist describes her decision to accompany her husband, an Iraq veteran, to the shooting range. A hospital worker in Mosul talks about what happens on a hunting trip back home with his grandfather. A veteran experiences the 2013 Boston marathon. The wife of a combat medic considers their unusual nighttime routines. A mother and former 50 cal gunner navigates truth and lies with her children. These stories offer a grace uncommon in war literature today. They also make an appeal to readers: to witness with compassion the men and women who—because of war—possess the strength to show us what it means to be fully human. Contributors include: Tahani Alsandook, Joseph R. Bawden, Brian Castner, David Chrisinger, David P. Ervin, Teresa Fazio, CH Guise, Colin D. Halloran, Lauren Kay Halloran, Matthew J. Hefti, Brooke King, Randy Leonard, Eva KL Miller, Stewart Moss, Caitlin Pendola, Mark Solheim, Richard Allen Smith, Christopher Stowe, and Melissa Walker.

The Man of Numbers
by Keith Devlin

The story of the man who introduced Hindu-Arabic numerals and the concept of zero to Europe that transformed business in the late Middle Ages and paved the way for the commercial and cultural explosion of the Renaissance

Mathematics
by Keith J. Devlin

Mathematics: The New Golden Age offers a glimpse of the extraordinary vistas and bizarre universes opened up by contemporary mathematicians: Hilbert’s tenth problem and the four-color theorem, Gaussian integers, chaotic dynamics and the Mandelbrot set, infinite numbers, and strange number systems. Why a “new golden age”? According to Keith Devlin, we are currently witnessing an astronomical amount of mathematical research. Charting the most significant developments that have taken place in mathematics since 1960, Devlin expertly describes these advances for the interested layperson and adroitly summarizes their significance as he leads the reader into the heart of the most interesting mathematical perplexities — from the biggest known prime number to the Shimura-Taniyama conjecture for Fermat’s Last Theorem.

Revised and updated to take into account dramatic developments of the 1980s and 1990s, Mathematics: The New Golden Age includes, in addition to Fermat’s Last Theorem, major new sections on knots and topology, and the mathematics of the physical universe.

Devlin portrays mathematics not as a collection of procedures for solving problems, but as a unified part of human culture, as part of mankind’s eternal quest to understand ourselves and the world in which we live. Though a genuine science, mathematics has strong artistic elements as well; this creativity is in evidence here as Devlin shows what mathematicians do — and reveals that it has little to do with numbers and arithmetic. This book brilliantly captures the fascinating new age of mathematics.


The Numbers Game
by Michael Blastland, A. W. Dilnot

The Strunk & White of statistics team up to help the average person navigate the numbers in the news.
Drawing on their hugely popular BBC Radio 4 show “More or Less, ,” journalist Michael Blastland and internationally known economist Andrew Dilnot delight, amuse, and convert American mathphobes by showing how our everyday experiences make sense of numbers.
The radical premise of “The Numbers Game” is to show how much we already know, and give practical ways to use our knowledge to become cannier consumers of the media. In each concise chapter, the authors take on a different theme?such as size, chance, averages, targets, risk, measurement, and data?and present it as a memorable and entertaining story.
If you?ve ever wondered what ?average? really means, whether the scare stories about cancer risk should convince you to change your behavior, or whether a story you read in the paper is biased (and how), you need this book. Blastland and Dilnot show how to survive and thrive on the torrent of numbers that pours through everyday life. It’s the essential guide to every cause you love or hate, and every issue you follow, in the language everyone uses.

Mathematics in Popular Culture
by Jessica K. Sklar, Elizabeth S. Sklar

Mathematics has maintained a surprising presence in popular media for over a century. In recent years, the movies Good Will Hunting, A Beautiful Mind, and Stand and Deliver, the stage plays Breaking the Code and Proof, the novella Flatland and the hugely successful television crime series NUMB3RS all weave mathematics prominently into their storylines. Less obvious but pivotal references to the subject appear in the blockbuster TV show Lost, the cult movie The Princess Bride, and even Tolstoy’s War and Peace. In this collection of new essays, contributors consider the role of math in everything from films, baseball, crossword puzzles, fantasy role-playing games, and television shows to science fiction tales, award-winning plays and classic works of literature. Revealing the broad range of intersections between mathematics and mainstream culture, this collection demonstrates that even “mass entertainment” can have a hidden depth.

Teaching Mathematics Using Popular Culture
by Elana Reiser

Mathematics teachers often struggle to motivate their students. One way to cultivate and maintain student interest is for teachers to incorporate popular media into their methodology. Organized on the subject strands of the Common Core, this book explores math concepts featured in contemporary films and television shows and offers numerous examples high school math teachers can use to design lessons using pop culture references. Outlines for lessons are provided along with background stories and historical references.

Posted on

Idiot

The Idiot
by Elif Batuman

A New York Times Book Review Notable Book

Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction

Longlisted for the Women’s Prize for Fiction

“An addictive, sprawling epic; I wolfed it down.”
—Miranda July, author of The First Bad Man and It Chooses You 

“Easily the funniest book I’ve read this year.”
GQ

A portrait of the artist as a young woman. A novel about not just discovering but inventing oneself.

The year is 1995, and email is new. Selin, the daughter of Turkish immigrants, arrives for her freshman year at Harvard. She signs up for classes in subjects she has never heard of, befriends her charismatic and worldly Serbian classmate, Svetlana, and, almost by accident, begins corresponding with Ivan, an older mathematics student from Hungary. Selin may have barely spoken to Ivan, but with each email they exchange, the act of writing seems to take on new and increasingly mysterious meanings. 
 
At the end of the school year, Ivan goes to Budapest for the summer, and Selin heads to the Hungarian countryside, to teach English in a program run by one of Ivan’s friends. On the way, she spends two weeks visiting Paris with Svetlana. Selin’s summer in Europe does not resonate with anything she has previously heard about the typical experiences of American college students, or indeed of any other kinds of people. For Selin, this is a journey further inside herself: a coming to grips with the ineffable and exhilarating confusion of first love, and with the growing consciousness that she is doomed to become a writer.

With superlative emotional and intellectual sensitivity, mordant wit, and pitch-perfect style, Batuman dramatizes the uncertainty of life on the cusp of adulthood. Her prose is a rare and inimitable combination of tenderness and wisdom; its logic as natural and inscrutable as that of memory itself. The Idiot is a heroic yet self-effacing reckoning with the terror and joy of becoming a person in a world that is as intoxicating as it is disquieting. Batuman’s fiction is unguarded against both life’s affronts and its beauty–and has at its command the complete range of thinking and feeling which they entail.

Named one the best books of the year by Refinery29 Mashable One • Elle Magazine • The New York Times • Bookpage • Vogue • NPR • Buzzfeed The Millions


The Real McCoys
by Matthew Swanson

Her name’s Moxie. Moxie McCoy.

Bold, opinionated, and haplessly self-confident, the world’s greatest fourth-grade detective faces her biggest challenge! When someone kidnaps beloved school mascot Eddie the Owl, Moxie is on the case—but she’s forced to fly solo now that her best friend (and crime-solving partner) has moved away.

Moxie must interview her classmates—both as potential new best friends and as possible suspects. She finds clues and points fingers but can’t save the owl on her own. Enter Moxie’s little brother, Milton. Quiet, cautious, and boring as a butter knife, he’s a good listener.

Can the Real McCoys form an unlikely alliance and solve the crime of the century?

Bursting with interactive illustrations on every page, Matthew Swanson and Robbi Behr’s The Real McCoys delivers clever storytelling, laugh-out-loud humor, and heartwarming insight. This is the first book in a series.

An Imprint Book

“Readers will breeze through this ingenious combination of text and art, eager for Moxie and Milton’s next case.” —School Library Journal, starred review

“Swanson’s witty text is enhanced exponentially by Behr’s bold, original artwork to create a uniquely told whodunit with wide appeal … An exceptional book.” —Booklist, starred review

“Delightfully topsy-turvy…readers will hope to see more of both siblings soon.” —Publishers Weekly, starred review

“An exceptional middle-grade read packed with giggles for young sleuths who love to explore a little off the beaten path.” —Kirkus Reviews

“An ingenious new series…an innovative reading experience that surprises and delights. Wordplay, witty descriptions and visual jokes abound.” —The Washington Post

“Swanson and Behr have created a gem with this hilarious elementary-level read with graphic novel tendencies.” —The Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books

“This clever, funny, delightful book is just what this crazy world needs. The surprising and inventive interaction between text and illustration shows that two brains are, indeed, better than one–especially when they belong to Matthew Swanson and Robbi Behr.” —Andrea Beaty, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Ada Twist Scientist

An Amazon Best Book of the Month

A Junior Library Guild Selection


My Heart Is an Idiot
by Davy Rothbart

Davy Rothbart is looking for love in all the wrong places. Constantly. He falls helplessly in love with pretty much every girl he meets—and rarely is the feeling reciprocated. Time after time, he hops in a car and tears across half of America with his heart on his sleeve. He’s continually coming up with outrageous schemes, which he always manages to pull off. Well, almost always. But even when things don’t work out, Rothbart finds meaning and humor in every moment. Whether it’s humiliating a scammer who takes money from aspiring writers or playing harmless (but side-splitting) goofs on his deaf mother, nothing and no one is off-limits.
But as much as Rothbart is a tragically lovable, irresistibly brokenhearted hero, it’s his prose that’s the star of the book. In the tradition of David Sedaris and Sloane Crosley but going places very much his own, his essays show how things that are seemingly so wrong can be so, so right.


Unhinged
by Omarosa Manigault Newman

In the #1 New York Times bestseller, the former Assistant to the President and Director of Communications for the Office of Public Liaison in the Trump White House provides an eye-opening and “explosive” (The Boston Globe) look into the corruption and controversy of the current administration.

Few were a member of Donald Trump’s inner orbit longer than Omarosa Manigault Newman. Their relationship spanned fifteen years—through four television shows, a presidential campaign, and a year by his side in the most chaotic, outrageous White House in history. But that relationship came to a decisive and definitive end, and Omarosa finally shares her side of the story in this “deftly executed” (The Guardian), jaw-dropping account.

A stunning tell-all and takedown from a strong, intelligent woman who took every name and number, Unhinged is a must-read for any concerned citizen.


How to Work for an Idiot
by John Hoover

How to Work for an Idiot is the confession of a recovering I-Boss (Idiot Boss). After decades of writing and consulting, John Hoover, also known as Dr. John, finally realized that the vast majority of people he kept trying to energize, motivate, and enlighten were, wellidiots. He also realized that he was an idiot for trying to change them. Instead, he has decided to enlighten you, the poor schlubs who actually must continue working for these Idiot Bosses. You cannot change them. You cannot challenge them. And no, you cannot practice anything on them that you saw on CSI or even CSI: Miami. But you can survive them; even thrive under them, if you know how to deal with them.

Things You Should Already Know About Dating, You F*cking Idiot
by Ben Schwartz, Laura Moses

A hilarious illustrated collection of tips for successfully navigating the dating world as a millennial.

For single millennials, this situation is all too familiar: You’re on a date. It’s going well! Then suddenly your date looks at you like you’re a f*cking idiot and you never hear from that person again. Guess you’re going to die alone, right? Maybe not! Humble authors Ben Schwartz and Laura Moses have written a book to save the future of the human race: Things You Should Already Know About Dating, You F*cking Idiot, a collection of 100 dating tips–complete with illustrations–that teaches clueless guys and girls the dos and don’ts of dating. In their book, Ben and Laura cover all the basics, from “Why are you texting in just Emojis, dummy?!” to “Stop playing games, idiot!” and, of course, “PUT YOUR PHONE DOWN, A**HOLE!” Simply put, this book will make you laugh and finally give you a fighting chance at not dying alone.


Fear
by Bob Woodward

“Explosive.”—The Washington Post
“Devastating.”—The New Yorker
“Unprecedented.”—CNN

THE INSIDE STORY ON PRESIDENT TRUMP, AS ONLY BOB WOODWARD CAN TELL IT

With authoritative reporting honed through eight presidencies from Nixon to Obama, author Bob Woodward reveals in unprecedented detail the harrowing life inside President Donald Trump’s White House and precisely how he makes decisions on major foreign and domestic policies. Woodward draws from hundreds of hours of interviews with firsthand sources, meeting notes, personal diaries, files and documents. The focus is on the explosive debates and the decision-making in the Oval Office, the Situation Room, Air Force One and the White House residence.

Fear is the most intimate portrait of a sitting president ever published during the president’s first years in office.


Guide to the Perfect Latin American Idiot
by Plinio Apuleyo Mendoza, Carlos Alberto Montaner, Alvaro Vargas Llosa

First published in Spanish in March 1996, the ‘Guide to the Perfect Latin American Idiot’ opens up the ever-increasing debate in Latin America regarding its ‘underdeveloped’ status. Witty, incisive, fact-packed, and entertaining, it was written by three disillusioned ex-leftists, or former ‘Latin American Idiots’, who believe that true free market reform is Latin America’s only hope. In this Guide, the authors target many of Latin America’s traditionally heroic icons, such as Castro, Che Guevara, Simon Bolivar, and the ‘popular church’. They also target sentiments of victimization and anti-Americanism and the blissful ignorance of economics that have for years provided so many Latin Americans with faulty explanations for their miseries. The Guide urges the Latin American Idiot to stop blaming others – the United States, the foreign debt, the multinationals – and start facing facts. Despite exciting controversy in Latin America, this provocative book reached number one on the nonfiction bestseller lists in many countries and is sure to continue prompting thoughtful – and sharp – debate on the origins of Latin America’s crises.

Posted on

Philosophy: Who Needs It

Philosophy
by Ayn Rand

This collection of essays was the last work planned by Ayn Rand before her death in 1982. In it, she summarizes her view of philosophy and deals with a broad spectrum of topics.

According to Ayn Rand, the choice we make is not whether to have a philosophy, but which one to have: rational, conscious, and therefore practical; or contradictory, unidentified, and ultimately lethal.

Written with all the clarity and eloquence that have placed Ayn Rand’s Objectivist philosophy in the mainstream of American thought, these essays range over such basic issues as education, morality, censorship, and inflation to prove that philosophy is the fundamental force in all our lives.


Philosophy
by Ayn Rand

In these essays, Ayn Rand reveals the hidden philosophic premises at work in the human soul. Her powerful mind ranges to every corner of the culture; her brilliant pen writes with the dispassionate clarity and passionate eloquence that are her literary trademarks. The book’s theme is expressed in the title essay, originally given as an address to a graduating class at West Point. To the question: “Who needs philosophy?” Miss Rand answere: “Everyone.” “A philosophic system,” she writes, “is and intefrated view of existence. As a human being, you have no choice about the fact that you need philosophy. Your only choice is whether you define your philosophy by conscious, rational, disciplined process of thought…or let your subconscious accumulate a junk heap of unwarranted conclusions……..” Philosophy, according to Ayn Rand, is the fundamental factor in human life; consciously or subconsciously, it is the basic factor that shapes the character of men, and the culture and destiny of nations. It shapes them for good or for evil, depending on the kind of philosophy they accept. Our choice, Miss Rand holds, is this : a philosophy of reason, rational selfishness, and laissez-faire capitalism–or a philosophy of irrationalism, altruism, and collectivism. Today’s world, she believes, is being destroyed by these latter ideas. The philosophy of reason she offers as the alternative is called Objectivism.

The Ayn Rand Lexicon
by Ayn Rand

A prolific writer, bestselling novelist, and world-renowned philosopher, Ayn Rand defined a full system of thought–from epistemology to aesthetics. Her writing is so extensive and the range of issues she covers so enormous that those interested in finding her discussions of a given topic may have to search through many sources to locate the relevant passage. The Ayn Rand Lexicon brings together all the key ideas of her philosophy of Objectivism. Begun under Rand’s supervision, this unique volume is an invaluable guide to her philosophy or reason, self-interest and laissez-faire capitalism–the philosophy so brilliantly dramatized in her novels The Fountainhead, We the Living, and Anthem.

Why Businessmen Need Philosophy
by Debi Ghate, Richard E. Ralston

The intellectual tooks every business person needs in the boardroom. Includes two rare essays by Ayn Rand!

With government and the media blaming big business for the world economic crisis, capitalism needs all the help it can get. It’s the perfect time for this collection of essays presenting a philosophical defense of capitalism by Ayn Rand and other Objectivist intellectuals. Essential and practical, Why Businessmen Need Philosophy reveals the importance of maintaining philosophical principles in the corporate environment at all levels of business from daily operations to executive decisions, and provides the tactical and tactful rational thinking required to defend companies from ideological attacks.


The Voice of Reason
by Ayn Rand

Between 1961, when she gave her first talk at the Ford Hall Forum in Boston, and 1981, when she gave the last talk of her life in New Orleans, Ayn Rand spoke and wrote about topics as varied as education, medicine, Vietnam, and the death of Marilyn Monroe. In The Voice of Reason, these pieces, written in the last decades of Rand’s life, are gathered in book form for the first time. With them are five essays by Leonard Peikoff, Rand’s longtime associate and literary executor. The work concludes with Peikoff’s epilogue, “My Thirty Years With Ayn Rand: An Intellectual Memoir,” which answers the question “What was Ayn Rand really like?” Important reading for all thinking individuals, Rand’s later writings reflect a life lived on principle, a probing mind, and a passionate intensity. This collection communicates not only Rand’s singular worldview, but also the penetrating cultural and political analysis to which it gives rise.

For the New Intellectual
by Ayn Rand

Here is Ayn Rand’s first non-fiction work—a challenge to the prevalent philosophical doctrines of our time and the “atmosphere of guilt, of panic, of despair, of boredom, and of all-pervasive evasion” that they create.

As incisive and relevant today as it was sixty years ago, this book presents the essentials of Ayn Rand’s philosophy “for those who wish to acquire an integrated view of existence.” In the title essay, she offers an analysis of Western culture, discusses the causes of its progress, its decline, its present bankruptcy, and points the road to an intellectual renaissance.

One of the most controversial figures on the intellectual scene, Ayn Rand was the proponent of a moral philosophy—and ethic of rational self-interest—that stands in sharp opposition to the ethics of altruism and self-sacrifice. The fundamentals of this morality—”a philosophy for living on Earth”—are here vibrantly set forth by the spokesman for a new class, For the New Intellectual.


Posted on

Ayn Rand Answers

Ayn Rand Answers: The Best of Her Q & A
by Robert Mayhew

After the publication of Atlas Shrugged in 1957, Ayn Rand occasionally lectured in order bring her philosophy of Objectivism to a wider audience and apply it to current cultural and political issues. These taped lectures and the question-and-answer sessions that followed not only added an eloquent new dimension to Ayn Rand’s ideas and beliefs, but a fresh and spontaneous insight into Ayn Rand herself. Never before available in print, this publishing event is a collection of those enlightening Q & As.
 
This is Ayn Rand on: ethics, Ernest Hemingway, modern art, Vietnam, Libertarians, Jane Fonda, religious conservatives, Hollywood Communists, atheism, Don Quixote, abortion, gun control, love and marriage, Ronald Reagan, pollution, the Middle East, racism and feminism, crime and punishment, capitalism, prostitution, homosexuality, reason and rationality, literature, drug use, freedom of the press, Richard Nixon, New Left militants, HUAC, chess, comedy, suicide, masculinity, Mark Twain, improper questions, and more.

Ayn Rand Answers
by Ayn Rand

After the publication of Atlas Shruggedin 1957, Ayn Rand turned to nonfiction writing and occasional lecturing. Her aim was to bring her philosophy, Objectivism, to a wider audience and apply it to current cultural and political issues. The taped lectures and the question-and-answer sessions that followed not only added an eloquent new dimension to Ayn Rand’s ideas and beliefs, but a fresh and spontaneous insight into Ayn Rand herself. Never before available in print, Ayn Rand Answersis a collection of those enlightening Q & As. THIS IS AYN RAND ON ETHICS * ERNEST HEMINGWAY * MODERN ART VIETNAM * LIBERTARIANS * JANE FORDA * RELIGIOUS CONSERVATIVES HOLLYWOOD COMMUNISTS * ATHEISM * DON QUIXOTE * ABORTION GUN CONTROL * LOVE AND MARRIAGE * RONALD REGAN * POLLUTION THE MIDDLE EAST * RACISM AND FEMINISM * CRIME AND PUNISHMENT CAPITALISM * PROSTITUTION * HOMOSEXUALITY REASON AND RATIONALITY * LITERATURE * DRUG USE FREEDOM OF THE PRESS * RICHARD NIXON * NEW LEFT MILITANTS HUAC * CHESS * COMEDY * SUICIDE * MASCULINITY * MARK TWAIN IMPROPER QUESTION * AND MORE

Answer to Ayn Rand
by John William Robbins

In Who Is Ayn Rand? Nathaniel Branden boasted : “No one has dared publicly to name the essential ideas of Atlas Shrugged and to attempt to refute them.” With the publication of this book, that statement no longer stands.

Anthem
by Ayn Rand

In Anthem, Rand examines a frightening future in which individuals have no name, no independence, and no values. Equality 7-2521 lives in the dark ages of the future where all decisions are made by committee, all people live in collectives, and all traces of individualism have been wiped out. Despite such a restrictive environment, the spark of individual thought and freedom still burns in him – a passion which he has been taught to call sinful. In a purely egalitarian world, Equality 7-2521 dares to stand apart from the herd – to think and choose for himself, to discover electricity, and to love the woman of his choice. Now he has been marked for death for committing the ultimate sin…

The Voice of Reason
by Ayn Rand

Between 1961, when she gave her first talk at the Ford Hall Forum in Boston, and 1981, when she gave the last talk of her life in New Orleans, Ayn Rand spoke and wrote about topics as varied as education, medicine, Vietnam, and the death of Marilyn Monroe. In The Voice of Reason, these pieces, written in the last decades of Rand’s life, are gathered in book form for the first time. With them are five essays by Leonard Peikoff, Rand’s longtime associate and literary executor. The work concludes with Peikoff’s epilogue, “My Thirty Years With Ayn Rand: An Intellectual Memoir,” which answers the question “What was Ayn Rand really like?” Important reading for all thinking individuals, Rand’s later writings reflect a life lived on principle, a probing mind, and a passionate intensity. This collection communicates not only Rand’s singular worldview, but also the penetrating cultural and political analysis to which it gives rise.

The Virtue of Selfishness
by Ayn Rand

A collection of essays that sets forth the moral principles of Objectivism, Ayn Rand’s controversial, groundbreaking philosophy.

Since their initial publication, Rand’s fictional works—Anthem, The Fountainhead, and Atlas Shrugged—have had a major impact on the intellectual scene. The underlying theme of her famous novels is her philosophy, a new morality—the ethics of rational self-interest—that offers a robust challenge to altruist-collectivist thought.

Known as Objectivism, her divisive philosophy holds human life—the life proper to a rational being—as the standard of moral values and regards altruism as incompatible with man’s nature. In this series of essays, Rand asks why man needs morality in the first place, and arrives at an answer that redefines a new code of ethics based on the virtue of selfishness.

More Than 1 Million Copies Sold!


Letters of Ayn Rand
by Ayn Rand

The publication of the letters of Ayn Rand is a cause for celebration, not only among the countless millions of Ayn Rand admirers the world over, but also among all those interested in the key political, philosophical, and artistic issues of our century. For there is no separation between Ayn Rand the vibrant, creative woman and Ayn Rand the intellectual dynamo, the rational thinker, who was also a passionately committed champion of individual freedom.

These remarkable letters begin in 1926, with a note from the twenty-year-old Ayn Rand, newly arrived in Chicago from Soviet Russia, an impoverished unknown determined to realize the promise of the land of opportunity. They move through her struggles and successes as a screenwriter, a playwright, and a novelist, her sensational triumph as the author of The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged, and her eminence as founder and shaper of Objectivism, one of the most challenging philosophies of our time. They are written to such famed contemporaries as Cecil B. DeMille, Frank Lloyd Wright, H.L. Mencken, Alexander Kerensky, Barry Goldwater and Mickey Spillane

There are letters to philosophers, priests, publishers, and political columnists; to her beloved husband, Frank O’ Connor; and to her intimate circle of friends and her growing legion of followers. Her letters range in tone from warm affection to icy fury, and in content from telling commentaries on the events of the day to unforgettably eloquent statements of her philosophical ideas. They are presented chronologically, with explanatory notes by Michael S. Berliner, who identifies the recipients of the letters and provides relevant background and context. Here is a chronicle that captures the inspiring drama of a towering literary genius and seminal thinker, and–often day-by-day–her amazing life.


Essays on Ayn Rand’s We the Living
by Robert Mayhew

Ayn Rand remains a truly significant figure of modern philosophy. Her unique vision of a world in which man, relying on reason, acts wholly for his own good is skillfully developed and illustrated in her most famous novels, Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead. But Rand’s first novel, We the Living, a lesser-known but no less important book, offers an early form of the author’s nascent philosophy–the philosophy Rand later called Objectivism. In the second edition, Robert Mayhew once again brings together pre-eminent scholars of Rand’s writing. The edition includes three new chapters, as well as an epilogue by renowned Rand-scholar Leonard Peikoff. In part a history of We the Living, from its earliest drafts to the Italian film later based upon it, Mayhew’s collection goes on to explore the enduring significance of Rand’s first novel as a work both of philosophy and of literature. For Ayn Rand scholars and fans alike, this enhanced second edition is a compelling examination of a novel that set the tone for some of the most influential philosophical literature to follow.

The Early Ayn Rand
by Ayn Rand

This remarkable, newly revised collection of Ayn Rand’s early fiction—including her previously unpublished short story The Night King—ranges from beginner’s exercises to excerpts from early versions of We the Living and The Fountainhead.

Ayn Rand Reader
by Ayn Rand

The Fountainhead, which became one of the most influential and widely read philosophical novels of the twentieth century, made Ayn Rand famous. An impassioned proponent of reason, rational self-interest, individualism, and laissez-faire capitalism, she expressed her unique views in numerous works of fiction and non-fiction that have been brought together for the first time in this one-of-a-kind volume.Containing excerpts from all her novels–including Atlas Shrugged, Anthem, and We The Living–The Ayn Rand Reader is a perfect introduction for those who have never read Rand, and provides teachers with an excellent guide to the basics of her viewpoint.

Posted on

We The Living

We the Living
by Ayn Rand

Ayn Rand’s first published novel, a timeless story that explores the struggles of the individual against the state in Soviet Russia.

First published in 1936, We the Living portrays the impact of the Russian Revolution on three human beings who demand the right to live their own lives and pursue their own happiness. It tells of a young woman’s passionate love, held like a fortress against the corrupting evil of a totalitarian state.

We the Living is not a story of politics, but of the men and women who have to struggle for existence behind the Red banners and slogans. It is a picture of what those slogans do to human beings. What happens to the defiant ones? What happens to those who succumb?

Against a vivid panorama of political revolution and personal revolt, Ayn Rand shows what the theory of socialism means in practice. 

Includes an Introduction and Afterword by Ayn Rand’s Philosophical Heir, Leonard Peikoff


We the Living
by Ayn Rand

The first literary work of one of the most influential philosophers and novelists of the twentieth century-available for the first time in trade paperback.

Ayn Rand wrote of her first novel, We the Living, “It is as near to an autobiography as I will ever write. The plot is invented, the background is not…The specific events of Kira’s life were not mine: her ideas, her convictions, her values, were and are.” We the Living depicts the struggle of the individual against the state, and the impact of the Russian Revolution on three human beings who demand the right to live their own lives and pursue their own happiness. It tells of a young woman’s passionate love, held like a fortress against the corrupting evil of a totalitarian state.

This classic novel is not a story of politics, but of the men and women who have to struggle for existence behind the banners and slogans.


Essays on Ayn Rand’s “We the Living”
by Robert Mayhew

Ayn Rand remains a truly significant figure of modern philosophy. Her unique vision of a world in which man, relying on reason, acts wholly for his own good is skillfully developed and illustrated in her most famous novels, Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead. But Rand’s first novel, We the Living, a lesser-known but no less important book, offers an early form of the author’s nascent philosophy—the philosophy Rand later called Objectivism.

In the second edition, Robert Mayhew once again brings together pre-eminent scholars of Rand’s writing. The edition includes three new chapters, as well as an epilogue by renowned Rand-scholar Leonard Peikoff. In part a history of We the Living, from its earliest drafts to the Italian film later based upon it, Mayhew’s collection goes on to explore the enduring significance of Rand’s first novel as a work both of philosophy and of literature. For Ayn Rand scholars and fans alike, this enhanced second edition is a compelling examination of a novel that set the tone for some of the most influential philosophical literature to follow.


Essays on Ayn Rand’s “We the Living”
by Robert Mayhew

Ayn Rand remains a truly significant figure of modern philosophy. Her unique vision of a world in which man, relying on reason, acts wholly for his own good is skillfully developed and illustrated in her most famous novels, Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead. But Rand’s first novel, We the Living, a lesser-known but no less important book, offers an early form of the author’s nascent philosophy–the philosophy Rand later called Objectivism. Robert Mayhew’s collection of entirely new essays brings together pre-eminent scholars of Rand’s writing. In part a history of We the Living, from its earliest drafts to the Italian film later based upon it, Mayhew’s collection goes on to explore the enduring significance of Rand’s first novel as a work both of philosophy and of literature. For Ayn Rand scholars and fans alike, this collection is a compelling examination of a novel that set the tone for some of the most influential philosophical literature to follow.

The Unconquered
by Ayn Rand

Ayn Rand was an American novelist, philosopher, playwright, and screenwriter. She is known for her two best-selling novels, The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged, and for developing a philosophical system known as Objectivism.

In the 1930s, Rand was asked to adapt her first novel, We the Living, for the theatre. We the Living is a story of life in post-revolutionary Russia and Rand’s first statement against communism. It was not a commercial success when it was published, but has gone on to sell over 3 million copies.

The first substantial fiction of Rand to appear in over twenty years, this important volume contains two never-before published versions of the play – the first and last versions (the latter entitled The Unconquered). With a preface that places the work in its historical and political context, an essay on the history of the theatrical adaptation by Jeff Britting, the curator of the Ayn Rand Archives, and two alternative endings, this book is a must-have for anyone interested in Rand’s philosophy.


Anthem
by Ayn Rand

Anthem by Ayn Rand from Coterie Classics

All Coterie Classics have been formatted for ereaders and devices and include a bonus link to the free audio book.

“I stand here on the summit of the mountain. I lift my head and I spread my arms. This, my body and spirit, this is the end of the quest. I wished to know the meaning of all things. I am the meaning. I wished to find a warrant for being. I need no warrant for being, and no word of sanction upon my being. I am the warrant and the sanction. Neither am I the means to any end others may wish to accomplish. I am not a tool for their use. I am not a servant of their needs. I am not a sacrifice on their alters.” ― Ayn Rand, Anthem
Ayn Randy’s dystopian novel imagines a world where the concept of self has been erased. When one man stands against the establishment, he dares to utter the word “I.”
This Xist Classics edition has been professionally formatted for e-readers with a linked table of contents. This eBook also contains a bonus book club leadership guide and discussion questions. We hope you’ll share this book with your friends, neighbors and colleagues and can’t wait to hear what you have to say about it.

Xist Publishing is a digital-first publisher. Xist Publishing creates books for the touchscreen generation and is dedicated to helping everyone develop a lifetime love of reading, no matter what form it takes


The passion of Ayn Rand
by Barbara Branden

Based on interviews with Rand and discussions with those close to her, this biography describes her life from her youth in Russia, to her stint in Hollywood as a screenwriter, and through her marriage, the publication of her novels, and the evolution of h

The Early Ayn Rand
by Ayn Rand

This remarkable, newly revised collection of Ayn Rand’s early fiction—including her previously unpublished short story The Night King—ranges from beginner’s exercises to excerpts from early versions of We the Living and The Fountainhead.

We, the Living
by Michael J. Schweitzer

An Empire, which has ruled the world for over a thousand years, is swept away. And the Undead, rising from the ashes of the Invasion of the Vozhan Bur, take control… And so begins “We, the Living”, the third and final book in Michael J. Schweitzer’s remarkable The Unending War fantasy fiction trilogy that began with “The Curse of Garnel Ironheart” and continued with “The Ashes of Alladag”. Once again, a ragtag group of friends sets out to save the world from the forces of evil. But now they face truly life-threatening obstacles — and not all will survive. Not since The Lord of the Rings has there been such a fascinating and spell-binding fantasy trilogy. With engaging, well-drawn characters, touches of humour, fast-paced storyline and an intricate plot full of twists and turns, “We, the Living” is a worthy successor to the first two books and another terrific contribution to the fantasy genre. This is Schweitzer at his best, creating and instilling whole new worlds with epic, breath-taking adventures.

Posted on

Maugham’s Collected Short Stories

Collected Short Stories
by William Somerset Maugham

These thirty stories, including the piece ‘Rain’, are set in the Pacific Islands, England, France, and Spain.

Collected Short Stories
by W. Somerset Maugham

The stories in this collection move from Malaya to America and England, and include some of Maugham’s most famous tales; ‘Flotsam and Jetsam’, the story of an old woman trapped for years in a loveless marriage in the remote rubber plantations; ‘The Man with the Scar’, and notably the opening story ‘The Vessel of Wrath’, a tale of the unexpected love that grows between a devout missionary nurse and a drunken reprobate. In this second volume of his collected stories, Maugham illustrates his characteristic wry perception of human foibles and his genius for evoking compelling drama from an acute sense of time and place.

Collected Stories
by W. Somerset Maugham

 

From one of the twentieth century’s most enduringly popular fiction writers: the only hardcover edition of his short stories.

 

Though W. Somerset Maugham was also famous for his novels and plays, it has been argued that in the short story he reached the pinnacle of his art. These expertly told tales, with their addictive plot twists and vividly drawn characters, are both galvanizing as literature and wonderfully entertaining. In the adventures of his alter ego Ashenden, a writer who (like Maugham himself) turned secret agent in World War I, as well as in stories set in such far-flung locales as South Pacific islands and colonial outposts in Southeast Asia, Maugham brings his characters vividly to life, and their humanity is more convincing for the author’s merciless exposure of their flaws and failures.

 

Whether the chasms of misunderstanding he plumbs are those between colonizers and natives, between a missionary and a prostitute, or between a poetry-writing woman and her uncomprehending husband, Maugham brilliantly displays his irony, his wit, and his genius in the art of storytelling.

(Book Jacket Status: Jacketed)


Rain and Other South Sea Stories (The Trembling of a Leaf Collection)
by William Somerset Maugham

This carefully crafted ebook: "Rain and Other South Sea Stories (The Trembling of a Leaf Collection)" is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. William Somerset Maugham (1874 – 1965) was a British playwright, novelist and short story writer. He was among the most popular writers of his era and reputedly the highest paid author during the 1930s. Content: The Trembling of a Leaf: Little Stories of the South Sea Islands The Pacific Mackintosh The Fall of Edward Barnard Red The Pool Honolulu Rain Envoi

The Essential W. Somerset Maugham Collection
by W. Somerset Maugham

Compiled in one book, the essential collection of books by W. Somerset Maugham
The Explorer
The Hero
The Land of Promise
The Land of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches and Impressions in Andalusia
Liza of Lambeth
The Magician
Moon and Sixpence
Of Human Bondage
Orientations
The Trembling of a Leaf

Posted on

Burning Bright

Burning Bright
by Nick Petrie

LOTS OF CHARACTERS GET COMPARED TO MY OWN JACK REACHER, BUT PETRIE’S PETER ASH IS THE REAL DEAL.—Lee Child

*An Entertainment Weekly Must List Pick

In the new novel featuring war veteran Peter Ash, “an action hero of the likes of Jack Reacher or Jason Bourne” (Lincoln Journal-Star), Ash has a woman’s life in his hands—and her mystery is stranger than he could ever imagine.
 
War veteran Peter Ash sought peace and quiet among the towering redwoods of northern California, but the trip isn’t quite the balm he’d hoped for. The dense forest and close fog cause his claustrophobia to buzz and spark, and then he stumbles upon a grizzly, long thought to have vanished from this part of the country. In a fight of man against bear, Peter doesn’t favor his odds, so he makes a strategic retreat up a nearby sapling.

There, he finds something strange: a climbing rope, affixed to a distant branch above. It leads to another, and another, up through the giant tree canopy, and ending at a hanging platform. On the platform is a woman on the run. From below them come the sounds of men and gunshots.

Just days ago, investigative journalist June Cassidy escaped a kidnapping by the men who are still on her trail. She suspects they’re after something belonging to her mother, a prominent software designer who recently died in an accident. June needs time to figure out what’s going on, and help from someone with Peter’s particular set of skills.

Only one step ahead of their pursuers, Peter and June must race to unravel this peculiar mystery. What they find leads them to an eccentric recluse, a shadowy pseudo-military organization, and an extraordinary tool that may change the modern world forever.


Burning Bright
by Melissa Scott

Governed by two political rulers, the planet Burning Bright is the location of the biggest virtual reality game in the universe. Quinn Lioe is tangled in a web of love and suspense when she becomes determined to play at the center of the virtual reality world and gets stuck in the war between the two empires. This science fiction adventure is one of Scott’s best and the complex futuristic world is unforgettable. 

Burning Bright
by Ron Rash

A FARMER and his wife fall on hard times. They haven’t lost everything the way others have, but they have lost enough. Their hope for a better future comes under threat when they discover an intruder on their land. A WOMAN from a small town marries an outsider. Her love for him battles with her suspicions that he is the source of the fires ravaging the mountains. A YOUNG BOY, neglected by his parents, sits in the remains of a crashed plane and lovingly tends to two frozen bodies.

Burning Bright
by Maryam Awaisu

Burning Bright is not a story about statistics, but of an over-achieving young lady, who is determined not to let sickle cell anemia stand in her way. Without notice, difficulties that Nadia Habeeb did not foresee complicate her health and love life, changing everything immensely. With the walls of life itself closing in on her, will she stand conqueror this time? If she does, what will be her fate back home in Nigeria, with a closed-off heart, and physical challenge?

This is a story of a family struggling to maintain faith and hope in the face of severe emotional challenges, social upheaval, medical necessity, and the paradox of humanity. Set within the complexities of Nigerian culture, it is the story of young people trying to make their way in a world they didnt make. It is also a story of pain and redemption, of love lost and found, generational conflict, and the emergence of true faith.


Burning Bright
by Tracy Chevalier

From the author of the international bestseller Girl With a Pearl Earring and At the Edge of the Orchard, comes a stirring eighteenth-century coming-of-age tale

In the waning days of eighteenth-century London, poet, artist, and printer William Blake works in obscurity as England is rocked by the shock waves of the French Revolution. Next door, the Kellaway family has just moved in, and country boy Jem Kellaway strikes up a tentative friendship with street-savvy Maggie Butterfield. As their stories intertwine with Blake’s, the two children navigate the confusing and exhilarating path to adolescence, and inspire the poet to create the work that enshrined his genius.


Burning Bright
by Chris Cannon

Bryn is back for her senior year at the Institute for Excellence, also known as shape-shifting dragon school. She isn’t sure which is scarier, the life-force sucking dragons stalking campus or the fact that she’s officially betrothed to Jaxon, a guy who will never love her. Not that she could ever love him, either… That’s just ridiculous.

Senior year should be fun. Her parents are alive, she’s finally fitting in, and she’s learning how to be a Medic. But what’s with Jaxon giving her strange looks? He runs hot and cold, and he doesn’t even have the excuse of being a hybrid fire-and-ice-breathing dragon like her. One minute they’re having a great time and the next, she wants to blast a fireball at his head. The marriage contract of doom looms over them–unless this match not made in heaven kindles a flame…

The Going Down in Flames series is best enjoyed in order
Reading Order:
Book #1- Going Down in Flames
Book #2- Bridges Burned
Book #3- Trial by Fire
Book #4- Fanning the Flames
Book #5- Burning Bright


Tiger Burning Bright
by Marion Zimmer Bradley

The city-state of Merina has no means to stop an invading army, so Dowager Queen Adele, Queen Lydana, and Princess Shelyra disappear from the palace. Hiding in places no one would suspect, they lead a counter-attack against the Emperor and his forces.


Burning Bright
by Sophie McKenzie

The sequel to Falling Fast. Four months have passed and River and Flynn’s romance is still going strong. River thinks Flynn has his anger under control, but when she discovers he has been getting into fights and is facing a terrible accusation at school, she starts to question both Flynn’s honesty – and the intensity of their passion. Things come to a head at a family get together when River sees Flynn fly into one unprovoked rage too many. The consequences for both of them are devastating and threaten to tear them apart forever.

Burning Bright
by John Steinbeck

THE STORY: It’s at the circus where we first meet the characters: Joe Saul, Victor and Mordeen are trapeze artists and Friend Ed, a clown. As the play develops, in a cleverly fascinating structure, the setting changes from circus to farm, then to a

Burning Bright
by Maggie Shayne, Anne Stuart, Judith Arnold

There’s a reason three women are drawn to Burning Bright, a small candle shop tucked away in snowy Crescent Cove, Vermont…

Return of the Light by Maggie Shayne

Dori Stewart’s six-figure Manhattan job has vanished, and her lover and friends have vanished with it. She’s scraping by as a waitress and awaiting the day she can return to New York in triumph. Maybe a ritual on the winter solstice can renew her wavering faith. What she needs is just the right candle…and Jason Farrar, an old boyfriend, by her side.

Star Light, Star Bright by Anne Stuart

Angela McKenna is back in Crescent Cove after a painful divorce. As if that isn’t enough, she discovers that her secret teenage crush is also back in town, hiding from the world. Her Christmas could use brightening up. Maybe if she bought a special candle…maybe if Brody Jackson was with her…

One for Each Night by Judith Arnold

Alana Ross needs a candle, too, one to fit her late grandmother’s antique menorah. Not just any candle will do. For Alana’s first Hanukkah open house in Crescent Cove, everything has to be perfect. Maybe that’ll make her feel more at home in her new town. It can’t hurt. So far she’s managed to alienate Jeffrey Barrett, the only man to show any interest in her, by accusing his uncle—in print—of a crime.


Posted on

Once There Was A War

Once There Was a War
by John Steinbeck

“Age can never dull this kind of writing,” writes the Chicago Tribune of John Steinbeck’s dispatches from World War II, filed for the New York Herald Tribune in 1943, which vividly captured the human side of war. Writing from England in the midst of the London blitz, North Africa, and Italy, Steinbeck focuses on the people as opposed to the battles, portraying everyone from the guys in the bomber crew to Bob Hope on his USO tour. He eats and drinks with soldiers behind enemy lines, talks with them, and fights beside them. First published in book form in 1958, these writings, now with a new introduction by Mark Bowden, create an unforgettable portrait of life in wartime that continues to resonate with truth and humanity.

Once There Was a War
by John Steinbeck

‘Do you know it, do you remember it, the drives, the attitudes, the terrors and, yes, the joys?’ Thus Steinbeck introduces his collection of poignant and hard-hitting dispatches for the New York Herald Tribune when the Second World War was at its height. He begins in England, recounting the courage of the bomber crews, the tragic air-raids and the strangeness of the British, before being sent to Africa and joining a special operations unit off the coast of Italy. Eating, drinking talking and fighting alongside the soldiers, Steinbeck’s empathy for the common man is always in evidence in these pieces, and he never fails to evoke the human side of an inhuman war.

‘If you have forgotten what the war was like, Steinbeck will refresh your memory. Age can never dull this kind of writing.’
Chicago Tribune


Once There Was a War
by John Steinbeck

Set in England, Africa and Italy this collection of Steinbeck’s World War II news correspondence was written for the New Yolk Herald Tribune in the latter part of 1943.

We Were Soldiers Once . . . and Young
by Harold G. Moore, Joseph L. Galloway

New York Times Bestseller: A “powerful and epic story . . . the best account of infantry combat I have ever read” (Col. David Hackworth, author of About Face).
 In November 1965, some 450 men of the First Battalion, Seventh Cavalry, under the command of Lt. Col. Harold Moore, were dropped into a small clearing in the Ia Drang Valley. They were immediately surrounded by 2,000 North Vietnamese soldiers. Three days later, only two and a half miles away, a sister battalion was brutally slaughtered. Together, these actions at the landing zones X-Ray and Albany constituted one of the most savage and significant battles of the Vietnam War. They were the first major engagements between the US Army and the People’s Army of Vietnam.
 How these Americans persevered—sacrificing themselves for their comrades and never giving up—creates a vivid portrait of war at its most devastating and inspiring. Lt. Gen. Moore and Joseph L. Galloway—the only journalist on the ground throughout the fighting—interviewed hundreds of men who fought in the battle, including the North Vietnamese commanders. Their poignant account rises above the ordeal it chronicles to depict men facing the ultimate challenge, dealing with it in ways they would have once found unimaginable. It reveals to us, as rarely before, man’s most heroic and horrendous endeavor.

Once There Was a Farm
by Virginia Bell Dabney

Nearly fifty years after she left the family farm of her childhood, Virginia Bell Dabney was compelled to write a memoir. She and her two sisters were raised on a Virginia farm during the hardscrabble years of the 1920s and 1930s. Her determined, independent mother managed to make a life for her famiy, despite hardships such as the Depression and a fire that destroyed their home. Although raised in a spare environment where leaky ceilings and cold winter nights were the norm, Dabney finds much to love, and to rejoice over, in her country upbringing: the wonder of hens laying eggs, the sensations asscoiated with milking a cow, her warm friendship with her mother’s black maid. The remarkable clarity of her half-century-old memories and her simple, unaffected tone bring this country childhood unforgettably to life.


Once There Were Castles
by Larry Millett

In Lost Twin Cities, Larry Millett brought to life the vanished architecture of downtown Minneapolis and St. Paul. Now, in Once There Were Castles, he offers a richly illustrated look at another world of ghosts in our midst: the lost mansions and estates of the Twin Cities.

Nobody can say for sure how many lost mansions haunt the Twin Cities, but at least five hundred can be accounted for in public records and archives. In Minneapolis and St. Paul, entire neighborhoods of luxurious homes have disappeared, virtually without a trace. Many grand estates that once spread out over hundreds of acres along the shores of Lake Minnetonka are also gone. The greatest of these lost houses often had astonishingly short lives: the lavish Charles Gates mansion in Minneapolis survived only nineteen years, and Norman Kittson’s sprawling castle on the site of the St. Paul Cathedral stood for barely more than two decades. Railroad and freeway building, commercial and institutional expansion, fires, and financial disasters all claimed their share of mansions; others succumbed to their own extravagance, becoming too costly to maintain once their original owners died.

The stories of these grand houses are, above all else, the stories of those who built and lived in them—from the fantastic saga of Marion Savage to the continent-spanning conquests of James J. Hill, to the all-but-forgotten tragedy of Olaf Searle, a poor immigrant turned millionaire who found and lost a dream in the middle of Lake Minnetonka. These and many other mansion builders poured all their dreams, desires, and obsessions into extravagant homes designed to display wealth and solidify social status in a culture of ever-fluctuating class distinctions.

The first book to take an in-depth look at the history of the Twin Cities’ mansions, Once There Were Castles presents ninety lost mansions and estates, organized by neighborhood and illustrated with photographs and drawings. An absorbing read for Twin Cities residents and a crucial addition to the body of work on the region’s history, Once There Were Castles brings these “ghost mansions” back to life.


Once Upon a Time There Was a War
by Les Kaluza

Merriam Press Personal Chronicle No. 9. First Edition, 2015. Once Upon a Time There Was a War is a kaleidoscope of events. It starts with World War II seen through the eyes of a child. The author was only nine years old when the war started and he writes about his memories of horrible events like hangings and executions of innocent people; senseless killings that brought misery to so many lives. But, being only a child, he also had times of fun and play. The reality of war, however, was ever-present. Despite those dark times, Les remained an optimist; he had his dreams of becoming an animator and of going to Hollywood. He didn’t know how, but he was sure that someday he would reach his goal. Les reached his goal and had a long career working for studios in Poland, as well as Disney and Hanna-Barbera in the U.S., and others. Those fascinating stories, and many more, are also in this memoir.

Once a Shepherd
by Glenda Millard

In poignant verse, the story of one young shepherd makes the experience of soldiers in World War I accessible to children.

Once there sang a carefree shepherd
In a field of emerald green . . .
Once his world was all at peace.

Here is the tale of Tom Shepherd, tending his lambs and shearing their fleece and wooing his sweetheart, who weaves the sheep’s wool to make him a coat. But then the Great War comes, and Tom must leave his beloved wife and his unborn child and go off to fight. In a moving, sobering story that resolves in a heartbreaking but beautiful ending, Once a Shepherd evokes the reality of war in a way young children can understand, while fostering a deep-felt hope for peace.


The Face of War
by Martha Gellhorn

A collection of “first-rate frontline journalism” from the Spanish Civil War to US actions in Central America “by a woman singularly unafraid of guns” (Vanity Fair).
 
For nearly sixty years, Martha Gellhorn’s fearless war correspondence made her a leading journalistic voice of her generation. From the Spanish Civil War in 1937 through the Central American wars of the mid-eighties, Gellhorn’s candid reporting reflected her deep empathy for people regardless of their political ideology. Collecting the best of Gellhorn’s writing on foreign conflicts, and now with a new introduction by Lauren Elkin, The Face of War is a classic of frontline journalism by “the premier war correspondent of the twentieth century” (Ward Just, The New York Times Magazine).
 
Whether in Java, Finland, the Middle East, or Vietnam, she used the same vigorous approach. “I wrote very fast, as I had to,” she says, “afraid that I would forget the exact sound, smell, words, gestures, which were special to this moment and this place.” As Merle Rubin noted in his review of this volume for The Christian ScienceMonitor, “Martha Gellhorn’s courageous, independent-minded reportage breaks through geopolitical abstractions and ideological propaganda to take the reader straight to the scene of the event.”

Posted on

Journal Of A Novel

Journal of a Novel
by John Steinbeck

Each working day from January 29 to November 1, 1951, John Steinbeck warmed up to the work of writing East of Eden with a letter to the late Pascal Covici, his friend and editor at The Viking Press. It was his way, he said, of “getting my mental arm in shape to pitch a good game.”

 

Steinbeck’s letters were written on the left-hand pages of a notebook in which the facing pages would be filled with the test of East of Eden. They touched on many subjects—story arguments, trial flights of workmanship, concern for his sons.

Part autobiography, part writer’s workshop, these letters offer an illuminating perspective on Steinbeck’s creative process, and a fascinating glimpse of Steinbeck, the private man.


Journal of a Novel
by John Steinbeck

This collection of letters forms a fascinating day-by-day account of Steinbeck’s writing of EAST OF EDEN, his longest and most ambitious novel. The letters, ranging over many subjects – textual discussion, trial flights of workmanship, family matters – provide an illuminating perspective on Steinbeck, the creative genius, and a private glimpse of Steinbeck, the man.

Journal of a Novel
by John Steinbeck

This collection of letters forms a fascinating day-by-day account of Steinbeck’s writing of EAST OF EDEN, his longest and most ambitious novel. The letters, ranging over many subjects – textual discussion, trial flights of workmanship, family matters – provide an illuminating perspective on Steinbeck, the creative genius, and a private glimpse of Steinbeck, the man.

Journal of a UFO Investigator
by David Halperin

A sparkling debut novel set in the sixties about a boy’s emotional and fantastical journey through alien worlds and family pain.

Against the backdrop of the troubled 1960s, this coming-of-age novel weaves together a compelling psychological drama and vivid outer-space fantasy. Danny Shapiro is an isolated teenager, living with a dying mother and a hostile father and without friends. To cope with these circumstances, Danny forges a reality of his own, which includes the sinister “Three Men in Black”, mysterious lake creatures with insectlike carapaces, a beautiful young seductress and thief with whom Danny falls in love, and an alien/human love child who-if only Danny can keep her alive-will redeem the planet. Danny’s fictional world blends so seamlessly with his day-to-day life that profound questions about what is real and what is not, what is possible and what is imagined begin to arise. As the hero in his alien landscape, he finds the strength to deal with his own life and to stand up to demons both real and imagined. Told with heart and intellect, Journal of a UFO Investigator will remind readers of the works of Michael Chabon and Jonathan Lethem.


Proceedings of 4th International Conference and Expo on Novel Physiotherapies 2017
by ConferenceSeries

 AUGUST 21-22, 2017   BIRMINGHAM, UK Key Topics :

Physiotherapy Specializations, Sports & Physiotherapy, Advancements in Physiotherapeutic treatments, Experimental techniques in Physiotherapies, Manual Physiotherapy Strategies,  Artificial Physiotherapy Methods, Womens Health & Palliative Care, Neurological Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy in Treatment & Care,  Physiotherapy Methods and Instrumentation, 

 


Cloud Atlas
by David Mitchell

By the New York Times bestselling author of The Bone Clocks | Shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize

A postmodern visionary and one of the leading voices in twenty-first-century fiction, David Mitchell combines flat-out adventure, a Nabokovian love of puzzles, a keen eye for character, and a taste for mind-bending, philosophical and scientific speculation in the tradition of Umberto Eco, Haruki Murakami, and Philip K. Dick. The result is brilliantly original fiction as profound as it is playful. In this groundbreaking novel, an influential favorite among a new generation of writers, Mitchell explores with daring artistry fundamental questions of reality and identity.

Cloud Atlas begins in 1850 with Adam Ewing, an American notary voyaging from the Chatham Isles to his home in California. Along the way, Ewing is befriended by a physician, Dr. Goose, who begins to treat him for a rare species of brain parasite. . . . Abruptly, the action jumps to Belgium in 1931, where Robert Frobisher, a disinherited bisexual composer, contrives his way into the household of an infirm maestro who has a beguiling wife and a nubile daughter. . . . From there we jump to the West Coast in the 1970s and a troubled reporter named Luisa Rey, who stumbles upon a web of corporate greed and murder that threatens to claim her life. . . . And onward, with dazzling virtuosity, to an inglorious present-day England; to a Korean superstate of the near future where neocapitalism has run amok; and, finally, to a postapocalyptic Iron Age Hawaii in the last days of history.

But the story doesn’t end even there. The narrative then boomerangs back through centuries and space, returning by the same route, in reverse, to its starting point. Along the way, Mitchell reveals how his disparate characters connect, how their fates intertwine, and how their souls drift across time like clouds across the sky.

As wild as a videogame, as mysterious as a Zen koan, Cloud Atlas is an unforgettable tour de force that, like its incomparable author, has transcended its cult classic status to become a worldwide phenomenon.

Praise for Cloud Atlas
 
“[David] Mitchell is, clearly, a genius. He writes as though at the helm of some perpetual dream machine, can evidently do anything, and his ambition is written in magma across this novel’s every page.”The New York Times Book Review
 
“One of those how-the-holy-hell-did-he-do-it? modern classics that no doubt is—and should be—read by any student of contemporary literature.”—Dave Eggers
 
“Wildly entertaining . . . a head rush, both action-packed and chillingly ruminative.”People
 
“The novel as series of nested dolls or Chinese boxes, a puzzle-book, and yet—not just dazzling, amusing, or clever but heartbreaking and passionate, too. I’ve never read anything quite like it, and I’m grateful to have lived, for a while, in all its many worlds.”—Michael Chabon
 
Cloud Atlas ought to make [Mitchell] famous on both sides of the Atlantic as a writer whose fearlessness is matched by his talent.”The Washington Post Book World
 
“Thrilling . . . One of the biggest joys in Cloud Atlas is watching Mitchell sashay from genre to genre without a hitch in his dance step.”Boston Sunday Globe
 
“Grand and elaborate . . . [Mitchell] creates a world and language at once foreign and strange, yet strikingly familiar and intimate.”Los Angeles Times


Synthesis and Characterization of Novel Functional Lignins – towards Bio-based Polyurethane Materials
by Jennifer Dietz

This thesis presents novel pathways for one step or two step modifications of different types of lignin without the need of any catalyst. Such novel functional lignins were characterized in detail and are now ready for their utilization in novel polymeric materials and thus for new applications. Hereby the value of lignin can be increased by offering novel strategies of incorporating lignins as building block into polyurethanes, but also various other polymer matrices are thinkable for future studies.

Maata’s Journal
by Paul Sullivan

“Can you live in two worlds at the same time?”

Maata has spent her life on the Arctic tundra, in a world of snow and ice. Her people, the Inuit, live a blissfully nomadic life, carrying all of their possessions on sleds, traveling with the seasons and the game. But one day a huge ship steams into their bay and forces her people onto it. They are taken to a Canadian government settlement camp, where there are incredible electric boats and houses with glass windows…and also alcohol and violence of a kind the Inuit have never known. Though her brother rebels and runs away, Maata realizes that in order to thrive in this new world, she must adapt to this new way of life. As she learns to read and write in English, she begins to keep a journal as she struggles to retain her traditional ways. However, when she is chosen to join a mapping expedition to her beloved homeland, she finds that all of her skills — both from her Inuit and western educations — become equally invaluable when tragedy strikes.

In this remarkable story of courage, survival, and the power of language, Paul Sullivan brings the breathtakingly harsh Arctic landscape, and a breathtakingly determined girl, to life.


Evaluation of Novel Approaches to Software Engineering
by Leszek A. Maciaszek, Pericles Loucopoulos

This book contains a collection of thoroughly refereed papers presented at the 5th International Conference on Evaluation of Novel Approaches to Software Engineering, ENASE 2010, held in Athens, Greece, in July 2010. The 19 revised and extended full papers were carefully selected from 70 submissions. They cover a wide range of topics, such as quality and metrics; service and Web engineering; process engineering; patterns, reuse and open source; process improvement; aspect-oriented engineering; and requirements engineering.