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Arthashastra

The ARTHASHASTRA
by Kautilya

An extraordinary detailed manual on statecraft and the science of living by one of classical India’s greatest minds; Kautilya; also known as Chanakya and Vishnugupta; wrote the Arthashastra not later than 150 AD though the date has not been conclusively established. Legend has it that he was either a Brahmin from Kerala or from north India; however; it is certain that Kautilya was the man who destroyed the Nanda dynasty and installed Chandragupta Maurya as the King of Magadha. A master strategist who was well-versed in the Vedas and adept at creating intrigues and devising political stratagems; Kautilya’s genius is reflected in his Arthashastra which is the most comprehensive treatise of statecraft of classical times. The text contains fifteen books which cover numerous topics viz.; the King; a complete code of law; foreign policy; secret and occult practices and so on. The Arthashastra is written mainly in prose but also incorporates 380 shlokas. Artha; literally wealth; is one of four supreme aims prescribed by Hindu tradition. However; it has a much wider significance and the material well-being of individuals is just a part of it. In accordance with this; Kautilya’s Arthashastra maintains that the state or government of a country has a vital role to play in maintaining the material status of both the nation and its people. Therefore; a significant part of the Arthashastra has to do with the science of economics. When it deals with the science of politics; the Arthashastra describes in detail the art of government in its widest sense—the maintenance of law and order as also of an efficient administrative machinery.

Arthashastra
by Tom Trautmann

This book is a definitive introduction to the classic text, the Arthashastra, the world’s first manual on political economy. The 2000-year-old treatise is ascribed to Kautilya, the prime minister of King Chandragupta Maurya, and is as important to Indian thought as Machiavelli’s The Prince is to Europe. Arthashastra, or ‘the science of wealth’, is a study of economic enterprise, and advises the king-entrepreneur on how to create prosperity. Thomas Trautmann’s exploration of this seminal work illuminates its underlying economic philosophy and provides invaluable lessons for the modern age.

Kautilya’s Arthashastra; The Way of Financial Management and Economic Governance
by Kautilya

The Arthashastra is an ancient Indian treatise on statecraft, economic policy and military strategy which identifies. Kautilya, also known as Chanakya is India’s most illustrious political economist.He regarded economic activity as the driving force behind the functioning of political dispensation and went to the extent of saying that revenue should take priority over the army because sustaining the army was possible out of a well-managed revenue system. Kautilya advocated limiting the taxation power of the State, having low rates of taxation, maintaining a gradual increase in taxation and devising a tax structure that ensured compliance.He strongly encouraged foreign trade

Kautilya’s Arthashastra
by Kau?alya, Priyadarshni Academy (Bombay, India)

Kautilya, also known as Chanakya, is India s most illustrious political economist of all time. He regarded economic activity as the driving force behind the functioning of any political dispensation. In fact, he went to the extent of saying that revenue should take priority over the army because sustaining the army was possible out of a well-managed revenue system.Kautilya advocated limiting the taxation power of the State, having low rates of taxation, maintaining a gradual increase in taxation and most importantly devising a tax structure that ensured compliance. He strongly encouraged foreign trade, basing it on the premise that for a successful trade contract to be established, it had to be beneficial to all. He emphasised State control and investment in land, water and mining. Kautilya was a true statesman who bridged the gap between experience and vision. For Kautilya, good governance was paramount. He suggested built-in checks and balances in systems and procedures for the containment of malpractices. Many postulates of Kautilya s philosophy of political economy are applicable to contemporary times.

The Arthasastra
by

The only extant treatise on statecraft from classical India, the Arthsastra is an invaluable resource for understanding ancient South Asian political thought; it also provides a comprehensive and unparalleled panoramic view of Indian society during the period between the Maurya (320-185 BCE) and Gupta (320-497 CE) empires.

This volume offers modern English translations of key selections, organized thematically, from the Arthasastra. A general Introduction briefly traces the arc of ancient South Asian history, explains the classical Indian tradition of statecraft, and discusses the origins and importance of the Arthasastra. Thorough explanatory essays and notes set each excerpt in its intellectual, political, and cultural contexts.


King, Governance, and Law in Ancient India
by Kauṭalya

King, Governance, and Law in Ancient India presents an English translation of Kautilya’s Arthashastra (AS.) along with detailed endnotes. When it was discovered in 1923, the Arthashastra was described as perhaps the most precious work in the whole range of Sanskrit literature, an assessment that still rings true. This new translation of this significant text, the first in close to half a century takes into account a number of important advances in our knowledge of the texts, inscriptions, and archeological and art historical remains from the period in Indian history to which the AS. belongs (2nd-3rd century CE, although parts of it may be much older). The text is what we would today call a scientific treatise. It codifies a body of knowledge handed down in expert traditions. It is specifically interested in two things: first, how a king can expand his territory, keep enemies at bay, enhance his external power, and amass riches; second, how a king can best organize his state bureaucracy to consolidate his internal power, to suppress internal enemies, to expand the economy, to enhance his treasury through taxes, duties, and entrepreneurial activities, to keep law and order, and to settle disputes among his subjects. The book is accordingly divided into two sections: the first encompassing Books 1-5 deals with internal matters, and the second spanning Books 6-14 deals with external relations and warfare. The AS. stands alone: there is nothing like it before it and there is nothing after it-if there were other textual productions within that genre they are now irretrievably lost. Even though we know of many authors who preceded Kautilya, none of their works have survived the success of the AS. Being “textually” unique makes it difficult to understand and interpret difficult passages and terms; we cannot look to parallels for help. The AS. is also unique in that, first, it covers such a vast variety of topics and, second, it presents in textual form expert traditions in numerous areas of human and social endeavors that were handed down orally. Expert knowledge in diverse fields communicated orally from teacher to pupil, from father to son, is here for the first time codified in text. These fields include: building practices of houses, forts, and cities; gems and gemology; metals and metallurgy; mining, forestry and forest management; agriculture; manufacture of liquor; animal husbandry, shipping, and the management of horses and elephants- and so on. Finally, it is also unique in presenting a viewpoint distinctly different from the Brahmanical “party line” we see in most ancient Indian documents.

Kautilya’s Arthashastra
by Kautilya’s Arthashastra

Chanakya was a great teacher of Takshashila University, who taught Chandragupta and made him the first Emperor of India. He is also known as Kautilya. He authored Chanakya Neeti, and Arthashastra [a political treatise]. Table of Contents Book I, “Concerning Discipline” Book II,”The Duties of Government Superintendents” Book III, “Concerning Law” Book IV, “The Removal of Thorns” Book V, “The Conduct of Courtiers” Book VI, “The Source of Sovereign States” Book VII, “The End of the Six-Fold Policy” Book VIII, “Concerning Vices and Calamities” Book IX, “The Work of an Invader” Book X, “Relating to War” Book XI, “The Conduct of Corporations” Book XII, “Concerning a Powerful Enemy” Book XIII, “Strategic Means to Capture a Fortress” Book XIV, “Secret Means” Book XV, “The Plan of a Treatise”

Kautilya’s Arthshastra
by B. K. Chaturvedi

Abridged translation of Kauṭalya’s Arthaśāstra.

The First Great Political Realist
by Roger Boesche

The First Great Political Realist is a succinct and penetrating analysis of one of the ancient world’s foremost political realists, Kautilya. Kautilya’s treatise Arthashastra stands as one of the great political books of the ancient world, its ideas on the science of politics strikingly similar to those of Thucydides, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Clausewitz, and even Sun Tsu. Roger Boesche’s excellent commentary on Kautilya’s voluminous text draws out the essential realist arguments for modern political analysis and demonstrates the continued relevance of Kautilya’s work to modern Indian strategic thinking and our understanding of the relationship between politics and economics. Striking a balance between textual analysis and secondary scholarship, Boesche’s work will be an enduring contribution to the study of ancient Indian history, Eastern political thought, and international relations.

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Age Of Wrath

The Age of Wrath
by Abraham Eraly

Wonderfully well researched . . . engrossing, enlightening’ The Hindu The Delhi Sultanate period (1206-1526) is commonly portrayed as an age of chaos and violence-of plundering kings, turbulent dynasties, and the aggressive imposition of Islam on India. But it was also the era that saw the creation of a pan-Indian empire, on the foundations of which the Mughals and the British later built their own Indian empires. The encounter between Islam and Hinduism also transformed, among other things, India’s architecture, literature, music and food. Abraham Eraly brings this fascinating period vividly alive, combining erudition with powerful storytelling, and analysis with anecdote.

Age of Wrath
by Abraham Eraly

The Delhi Sultanate period (1206-1526) is commonly portrayed as an age of chaos and violence-of plundering kings, turbulent dynasties, and the aggressive imposition of Islam on India. But it was also the era that saw the creation of a pan-Indian empire, on the foundations of which the Mughals and the British later built their own Indian empires. The encounter and Hinduism also transformed, among other things, India’s architecture, literature, music and food. Abraham Eraly brings this fascinating period vividly alive, combining erudition with powerful storytelling, and analysis with anecdote.

‘Wonderfully well researched . . . engrossing, enlightening.’ The Hindu

‘An insightful perspective . . . Eraly has a unique ability to create portraits which come to life on the page.’Time Out

‘remarkably comprehensive and detailed.’ Business Standard

‘Captivating . . . reads like a delightful novel.’Dawn


The Age of Wrath
by Abraham Eraly

The Delhi Sultanate period (1206 – 1526) is commonly portrayed as an age of chaos and violence – of rapacious, plundering kings, turbulent dynasties, and the aggressive imposition of Islam on India. But it was also the era that saw the creation of a pan-Indian empire, on the foundations of which the Mughals and the British later built their own Indian empires.

The encounter between Islam and Hinduism also transformed, among other things, India’s architecture, literature, music and food. Abraham Eraly brings this fascinating period vividly alive, portraying the many kings – mad, brilliant, astute, cruel – who ruled during this period, and discussing the political, social and cultural developments that transformed India. Combining erudition with powerful storytelling, analysis with anecdote, The Age of Wrathis a superb book.


The Wrath and the Dawn
by Renée Ahdieh

A #1 New York Times Bestseller!

“A riveting Game of Thrones meets Arabian Nights love story.” – US Weekly

Every dawn brings horror to a different family in a land ruled by a killer. Khalid, the eighteen-year-old Caliph of Khorasan, takes a new bride each night only to have her executed at sunrise. So it is a suspicious surprise when sixteen-year-old Shahrzad volunteers to marry Khalid. But she does so with a clever plan to stay alive and exact revenge on the Caliph for the murder of her best friend and countless other girls. Shazi’s wit and will, indeed, get her through to the dawn that no others have seen, but with a catch . . . she’s falling in love with the very boy who killed her dearest friend.

She discovers that the murderous boy-king is not all that he seems and neither are the deaths of so many girls. Shazi is determined to uncover the reason for the murders and to break the cycle once and for all.


The Grapes of Wrath
by John Steinbeck

The Grapes of Wrath is the brilliantly written story depicting the life of Americans during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s when Oklahoma farmers were forced off the land they had farmed for generations and they moved to California for the better life they believed they would find picking peaches and grapes. The Grapes of Wrath was written in 1939 by John Steinbeck (1902-1968). In 1940 it was made into a movie staring Henry Fonda. The title comes from a line in the song -The Battle Hymn of the Republic-. The book is still controversial and efforts are still made to ban it from school libraries. The movie has not been remade, probably for the same reason.

Wrath of the Storm (Mark of the Thief #3)
by Jennifer A. Nielsen

Trouble has a way of seeking out Nicolas Calva, and it’s not likely to leave him alone any time soon. With Caesar’s magic bulla, the Malice of Mars, and the possibility of a Jupiter Stone in play, all the powers of Rome are circling Nic. He’ll have to maneuver his way through scheming government officials and reawakened magical beasts to save the Empire. Can he manage to keep his friends and family safe, claim his own freedom once and for all, and rescue the Empire — before the magic gets the better of him? With twists and turns on every page, critically acclaimed author Jennifer Nielsen weaves an epic, action-packed conclusion to her extraordinary Mark of the Thief trilogy.

Song of Wrath
by J. E. Lendon

A prize-winning classicistÕs thrilling account of the Ten YearsÕ WarÑthe first stage of the Peloponnesian War

The Pre-Wrath Rapture View
by Renald E. Showers

An authoritative biblical critique of the recent pre-wrath rapture theory popularized by Rosenthal and Van Kampen.

The Wrath of God Satisfied?
by Tom Stuckey

What do Robben Island, Colonel Gadaffi, the earthquake in Haiti, the riots in London, credit crunch, child abuse, and the death of Christ have in common? They are all linked by the common thread of violence. Tom Stuckey reexamines the traditional theories of atonement, which he argues are contextual and utilitarian, as he searches for meaning and hope in these contemporary events.

In The Wrath of God Satisfied?, Tom Stuckey argues that because we live in a violent world, we should not dismiss the idea of the wrath of God or the disturbing metaphors of blood, debt, satisfaction, and sacrifice. While not subscribing to the theory of penal substitution, he does not dismiss it. Within a dynamic interpretation of the Trinity, the author draws on the insights of Athanasius, Anselm, Abelard, Luther, Calvin, Julian, Girard, Augustine, Barth, and contemporary theologians to show how divine wrath "being satisfied" poses the question of God in its most acute form. Stuckey sees God’s wrath as a necessary shadow cast by the powerful light of hope and argues that wrath cannot be dismissed if justice is to be restored.


Wrath
by John Gwynne

The fourth in the Faithful and the Fallen series from John Gwynne, an epic fantasy perfect for fans of George R. R. Martin, Brandon Sanderson and David Gemmell.
Events are coming to a climax in the Banished Lands, as the war reaches new heights. King Nathair has taken control of the fortress at Drassil and three of the Seven Treasures are in his possession. And together with Calidus and his ally Queen Rhin, Nathair will do anything to obtain the remaining Treasures. With all seven under his command, he can open a portal to the Otherworld. Then Asroth and his demon-horde will finally break into the Banished Lands and become flesh.

Meanwhile Corban has been taken prisoner by the Jotun, warrior giants who ride their enormous bears into battle. His warband scattered, Corban must make new allies if he hopes to survive. But can he bond with competing factions of warlike giants? Somehow he must, if he’s to counter the threat Nathair represents.

His life hangs in the balance – and with it, the fate of the Banished Lands.