Posted on

Online Library Instruction

Creating and Sharing Online Library Instruction
by Joelle Pitts, Sara K. Kearns, Heather Collins

The authors offer a model for building online library instruction that can be reused, repurposed, and remixed across classes, departments, and even institutions. Although the information landscape is continually evolving, the practices, tips and suggestions found in these pages should help readers through the decision making processes for a sustainable instructional model.

Fundamentals of Library Instruction
by Monty L. McAdoo

Being a great teacher is part and parcel of being a great librarian. In this book, veteran instruction services librarian McAdoo lays out the fundamentals of the discipline in easily accessible language. Succinctly covering the topic from top to bottom, he Offers an overview of the historical context of library instruction, drawing on recent research in learning theory to help the instructor choose the most effective strategies for any situation Shows readers how to assess the information needs of a given audience, how to develop a curriculum for teaching information literacy, and how to fit an appropriate amount of content into the allotted time Addresses the pros and cons of online versus face-to-face instruction Includes methods for publicizing the availability of the library’s learning opportunities With expert guidance for putting theory into practice, McAdoo’s book helps librarians connect with students as effectively as possible.

Transforming Academic Library Instruction
by Amanda Nichols Hess

Academic librarians working in instruction are at the crux of professional, higher educational, and societal change. While they work with disciplinary faculty to ensure learners are critical information consumers and producers in 21st century ways, how do academic librarians develop a sense of their own identities as post-secondary instructors? Using both broad and in-depth data from practicing instruction librarians, this book identifies the catalysts and influences in academic librarians’ perspective development process. From these factors, then, instruction librarians and librarians-to-be can hone their own instructional identities and transform their teaching practices.

This focus on understanding this perspective transformation process around instructional identities offers both working academic librarians and LIS graduate students an innovative way to think about their roles as educators. While many books explore the practical or how-to aspects of teaching in libraries, Transforming Academic Librarianship: How to Hone Your Instructional Identity and Adopt Best Teaching Practice takes a step up and examines how academic librarians think about or approach instruction as a part of their work. Through explicating this metacognitive process, this book helps both academic librarians and librarians-to-be to more intentionally consider their teaching practices and professional identities.


Changing the Scope of Library Instruction in the Digital Age
by Bhattacharyya, Swati, Patnaik, K Rama

The current digital age is impacting the contents and delivery of instructional service in many ways. Instructional sessions not only describe various features of a resource, but these sessions also bring issues like the ethical use of information, copyrights, and the value of open knowledge to light. Librarians are required to help users to learn use these tools.

Changing the Scope of Library Instruction in the Digital Age provides emerging information on data visualization tools, creating effective instructions, and instructional design in library sciences. While highlighting the challenges of effectively training new and seasoned librarians in these various aspects of data technology and teaching methods, readers will learn the importance of giving librarians the tools they need to complete their new responsibilities. This book is an important resource for entry level and seasoned librarians, researchers, and instructional design specialists seeking current research on up to date library instruction in the modern technology age.


Curriculum-Based Library Instruction
by Amy Blevins, Megan Inman

The rampant nature of technology has caused a shift in information seeking behaviors. In addition, current trends such as evidence based medicine and information literacy mean that one time instructional sessions cannot provide our patrons with all of the skills they need. For this reason, many librarians are working to develop curriculum based instruction that is semester long or consisting of many sessions throughout an academic program. In addition to teaching, librarians are also becoming embedded in the curriculums they support by serving as web-based course designers, problem-based learning facilitators, or members of curriculum committees.
Although it is fairly obvious that library instruction is important and that librarians should be equipped to provide this instruction, the majority of ALA accredited programs offer only one course on library instruction, the courses are only available as electives, and they are often only offered once a year. Librarians need to gain their instructional experiences through real life experiences, mentors, and of course, books like this one. Many books commonly discuss one-shot sessions and provide tips for getting the most out of that type of instruction. There are not as many that discuss curriculum based instruction in a section, let alone an entire book.

Curriculum-Based Library Instruction: From Cultivating Faculty Relationships to Assessment highlights the movement beyond one-shot instruction sessions, specifically focusing on situations where academic librarians have developed curriculum based sessions and/or become involved in curriculum committees.

This volume describes and provides examples of librarians’ varied roles in the curriculum of education programs. These roles include semester long or multi-session instructor, web-based course designer, problem-based learning facilitator, and member of a curriculum committee. In addition to describing the roles that librarians have in supporting curriculum, the book describes how to carry out those roles with sections devoted to adult learning theory, teaching methods, developing learning objectives, and working with faculty to develop curriculum. Examples of library sessions devoted to information literacy, evidence based practice, information literacy, and biomedical informatics are included. This book is not limited to one mode of delivering information and covers examples of face to face, distance and blended learning initiatives.


Library Instruction
by Susan Deese-Roberts, Kathleen Keating

Changing technologies and diversifying populations have meant a higher demand for library instruction at most academic libraries. This book demonstrates how you can meet that demand by using peer tutors to support and enhance your library services. Peer tutors can teach library patrons online search concepts and skills and how to use other specific research tools. This practical, step-by-step plan for developing and implementing a peer tutoring program can improve library services and make your job easier.


Critical Library Instruction
by Maria T. Accardi, Emily Drabinski, Alana Kumbier

Bringing together the voices of a range of practicing librarians, this collection illuminates theories and methods of critical pedagogy and library instruction. Chapters address critical approaches to standards and assessment practices, links between queer, anti-racist and feminist pedagogies and the library classroom, intersections of critical theories of power and knowledge and the library, and the promise and peril of reflective instruction practices. Rooted in theoretical work both from within the profession (James Elmborg, Cushla Kapitzke) and without (Paolo Freire, Henry Giroux, Deborah Britzman), contributions are complemented by stories of critical approaches put into practice in institutional settings ranging from the community college classroom to large urban research universities to virtual worlds. The intention is to begin a conversation among librarians who teach, library instruction program coordinators, faculty and instructors interested in bringing librarians into the classroom, and librarians interested in developing liberatory and anti-oppressive professional practices.

Library Instruction Design
by Di Su

The design philosophies of Google and Apple represent different approaches to new product design. Google’s model features bottom-up and data-driven decision-making processes, while Apple’s model is to design and build products top-down. Library instruction program design may learn from these differing but complementary approaches. Inspired by Google’s and Apple’s success, Library Instruction Design details how library instruction program design may learn from the philosophy of product design in the business world. In designing library instruction, a Google-philosophy approach teaches what the user wants to know while an Apple-philosophy approach teaches what the librarian thinks the user needs to learn. These two design philosophies aim at different teaching objectives reflecting library and information science education in modern society. The book is divided into five sections, with opening sections covering library instruction, the philosophy of library instruction design and design philosophy from different angles. Later sections discuss applying Google’s model and applying Apple’s model.

  • Offers a creative way to think about library instruction program design
  • Suggests two design approaches grounded in two philosophies, represented by the design approaches of Google and Apple
  • Details the differences and complementarities between top-down and bottom-up approaches to design

Curriculum-Based Library Instruction
by Amy Blevins, Megan Inman

The rampant nature of technology has caused a shift in information seeking behaviors. In addition, current trends such as evidence based medicine and information literacy mean that one time instructional sessions cannot provide our patrons with all of the skills they need. For this reason, many librarians are working to develop curriculum based instruction that is semester long or consisting of many sessions throughout an academic program. In addition to teaching, librarians are also becoming embedded in the curriculums they support by serving as web-based course designers, problem-based learning facilitators, or members of curriculum committees.
Although it is fairly obvious that library instruction is important and that librarians should be equipped to provide this instruction, the majority of ALA accredited programs offer only one course on library instruction, the courses are only available as electives, and they are often only offered once a year. Librarians need to gain their instructional experiences through real life experiences, mentors, and of course, books like this one. Many books commonly discuss one-shot sessions and provide tips for getting the most out of that type of instruction. There are not as many that discuss curriculum based instruction in a section, let alone an entire book.

Curriculum-Based Library Instruction: From Cultivating Faculty Relationships to Assessment highlights the movement beyond one-shot instruction sessions, specifically focusing on situations where academic librarians have developed curriculum based sessions and/or become involved in curriculum committees.

This volume describes and provides examples of librarians’ varied roles in the curriculum of education programs. These roles include semester long or multi-session instructor, web-based course designer, problem-based learning facilitator, and member of a curriculum committee. In addition to describing the roles that librarians have in supporting curriculum, the book describes how to carry out those roles with sections devoted to adult learning theory, teaching methods, developing learning objectives, and working with faculty to develop curriculum. Examples of library sessions devoted to information literacy, evidence based practice, information literacy, and biomedical informatics are included. This book is not limited to one mode of delivering information and covers examples of face to face, distance and blended learning initiatives.


The One-shot Library Instruction Survival Guide
by Heidi E. Buchanan, Beth A. McDonough

Faced with planning a one-shot library instruction session, librarians can feel hard-pressed to squeeze in all their library has to offer along with tips on the research process. Authentic learning with student interaction may seem unattainable in only an hour. But it’s not. The keys are communicating clearly with the course instructor, developing a realistic plan, and employing effective teaching strategies. With more than 30 years’ combined experience in teaching information literacy, Buchanan and McDonough invite librarians to turn everyday challenges into instruction that is meaningful and relevant for students. Supplying the knowledge and tools to make it happen, their guide provides communication and collaboration strategies to help librarians co-design information literacy sessions with course instructors, including conversation starters and talking points; helps librarians focus on how to provide the most useful, relevant library instruction within the limited timeframe of a one-shot session; presents active learning strategies and classroom assessment techniques that facilitate meaningful learning; shows how to match the best hands-on activities to students’ stage in the research process; gives solutions to common problems, like handling a less-than-ideal teaching environment, what to do when you’re running short of time, and dealing with difficult students; suggests practical ways to use teaching strategies as assessment, enabling librarians to improve teaching and learning; and offers numerous real-world examples and case studies of one-shot library instruction. Filled with invaluable guidance based on decades of classroom experience, wisdom from the literature, and voices from the field, this resource will help librarians become better, more confident teachers.–From Amazon.com.