Posted on

Online Library Journal Articles

Pharmaceutical Medicine
by Adrian Kilcoyne, Phil Ambery, Daniel O’Connor

The breadth of the pharmaceutical medicine can be daunting, but this book is designed to navigate a path through the speciality. Providing a broad overview of all topics relevant to the discipline of pharmaceutical medicine, it gives you the facts fast, in a user-friendly format, without having to dive through page upon page of dense text. With 136 chapters spread across 8 sections, the text offers a thorough grounding in issues ranging from medicines regulation to clinical trial design and data management. This makes it a useful revision aid for exams as well as giving you a taster of areas of pharmaceutical medicine adjacent to your current role. For healthcare professionals already working in the field, this book offers a guiding hand in difficult situations as well as supplying rapid access to the latest recommendations and guidelines. Written by authors with experience in the industry and drug regulation, this comprehensive and authoritative guide provides a shoulder to lean on throughout your pharmaceutical career.

How to Write a Thesis
by Umberto Eco

Umberto Eco’s wise and witty guide to researching and writing a thesis, published in English for the first time.

By the time Umberto Eco published his best-selling novel The Name of the Rose, he was one of Italy’s most celebrated intellectuals, a distinguished academic and the author of influential works on semiotics. Some years before that, in 1977, Eco published a little book for his students, How to Write a Thesis, in which he offered useful advice on all the steps involved in researching and writing a thesis—from choosing a topic to organizing a work schedule to writing the final draft. Now in its twenty-third edition in Italy and translated into seventeen languages, How to Write a Thesis has become a classic. Remarkably, this is its first, long overdue publication in English.

Eco’s approach is anything but dry and academic. He not only offers practical advice but also considers larger questions about the value of the thesis-writing exercise. How to Write a Thesis is unlike any other writing manual. It reads like a novel. It is opinionated. It is frequently irreverent, sometimes polemical, and often hilarious. Eco advises students how to avoid “thesis neurosis” and he answers the important question “Must You Read Books?” He reminds students “You are not Proust” and “Write everything that comes into your head, but only in the first draft.” Of course, there was no Internet in 1977, but Eco’s index card research system offers important lessons about critical thinking and information curating for students of today who may be burdened by Big Data.

How to Write a Thesis belongs on the bookshelves of students, teachers, writers, and Eco fans everywhere. Already a classic, it would fit nicely between two other classics: Strunk and White and The Name of the Rose.

Contents
The Definition and Purpose of a Thesis • Choosing the Topic • Conducting Research • The Work Plan and the Index Cards • Writing the Thesis • The Final Draft


Magazines for Libraries
by Cheryl Laguardia, Bill Katz, Linda Sternberg Katz

Reviewing the best publications for all serials collections since 1969.

Three Women
by Lisa Taddeo

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

“Extraordinary…A nonfiction literary masterpiece…I can’t remember the last time a book affected me as profoundly as Three Women.” —Elizabeth Gilbert

“The hottest book of the summer…Groundbreaking…Breathtaking…Staggeringly intimate.” —Entertainment Weekly

“The most in-depth look at the female sex drive that’s been published in decades.” —New York

Three Women will be whispered about around pools from coast to coast.” —Town & Country

Desire as we’ve never seen it before: a riveting true story about the sex lives of three real American women, based on nearly a decade of reporting.

It thrills us and torments us. It controls our thoughts, destroys our lives, and it’s all we live for. Yet we almost never speak of it. And as a buried force in our lives, desire remains largely unexplored—until now. Over the past eight years, journalist Lisa Taddeo has driven across the country six times to embed herself with ordinary women from different regions and backgrounds. The result, Three Women, is the deepest nonfiction portrait of desire ever written and one of the most anticipated books of the year.

We begin in suburban Indiana with Lina, a homemaker and mother of two whose marriage, after a decade, has lost its passion. She passes her days cooking and cleaning for a man who refuses to kiss her on the mouth, protesting that “the sensation offends” him. To Lina’s horror, even her marriage counselor says her husband’s position is valid. Starved for affection, Lina battles daily panic attacks. When she reconnects with an old flame through social media, she embarks on an affair that quickly becomes all-consuming.

In North Dakota we meet Maggie, a seventeen-year-old high school student who finds a confidant in her handsome, married English teacher. By Maggie’s account, supportive nightly texts and phone calls evolve into a clandestine physical relationship, with plans to skip school on her eighteenth birthday and make love all day; instead, he breaks up with her on the morning he turns thirty. A few years later, Maggie has no degree, no career, and no dreams to live for. When she learns that this man has been named North Dakota’s Teacher of the Year, she steps forward with her story—and is met with disbelief by former schoolmates and the jury that hears her case. The trial will turn their quiet community upside down.

Finally, in an exclusive enclave of the Northeast, we meet Sloane—a gorgeous, successful, and refined restaurant owner—who is happily married to a man who likes to watch her have sex with other men and women. He picks out partners for her alone or for a threesome, and she ensures that everyone’s needs are satisfied. For years, Sloane has been asking herself where her husband’s desire ends and hers begins. One day, they invite a new man into their bed—but he brings a secret with him that will finally force Sloane to confront the uneven power dynamics that fuel their lifestyle.

Based on years of immersive reporting, and told with astonishing frankness and immediacy, Three Women is a groundbreaking portrait of erotic longing in today’s America, exposing the fragility, complexity, and inequality of female desire with unprecedented depth and emotional power. It is both a feat of journalism and a triumph of storytelling, brimming with nuance and empathy, that introduces us to three unforgettable women—and one remarkable writer—whose experiences remind us that we are not alone.


Environmental Impact Statements
by Jacob I. Bregman, Kenneth M. Mackenthun

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments must be completed for any major action that requires a federal permit. Each federal agency has its own requirements regarding what must appear in the statement. Furthermore, many states and local agencies, such as those in California, the District of Columbia, and the city of Chicago, have their own versions of Environmental Impact Statements that must be done for any proposed construction. This book covers the requirements for a wide variety of Environmental Impact Statements on the federal, state, and local levels. It provides a thorough explanation of Environmental Impact Statements so that personnel responsible for preparing these documents will be able to understand and teach others the fundamentals of the wide range of environmental factors-ecological and socioeconomic-that comprise an Environmental Impact Statement.
Environmental Impact Statements is an indispensable book for architectural and engineering firms, industrial firms, and regulatory agencies on all levels. It will also make an important text for instructors and students participating in courses that discuss Environmental Impact Statements and how to complete them.

Beilsteins Handbuch Der Organischen Chemie
by Friedrich Konrad Beilstein, Deutsche Chemische Gesellschaft

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.

This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.

As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.


Science and Politics
by Brent S. Steel

Recent partisan squabbles over science in the news are indicative of a larger tendency for scientific research and practice to get entangled in major ideological divisions in the public arena. This politicization of science is deepened by the key role government funding plays in scientific research and development, the market leading position of U.S.-based science and technology firms, and controversial U.S. exports (such as genetically modified foods or hormone-injected livestock).

This groundbreaking, one-volume, A-to-Z reference features 120-150 entries that explore the nexus of politics and science, both in the United States and in U.S. interactions with other nations. The essays, each by experts in their fields, examine:

  • Health, environmental, and social/cultural issues relating to science and politics
  • Concerns relating to government regulation and its impact on the practice of science
  • Key historical and contemporary events that have shaped our contemporary view of how science and politics intersect

Science and Politics: An A to Z Guide to Issues and Controversies is a must-have resource for researchers and students who seek to deepen their understanding of the connection between science and politics.


Ask Again, Yes
by Mary Beth Keane

“A beautiful novel, bursting at the seams with empathy.”Elle

A profoundly moving novel about two neighboring families in a suburban town, the friendship between their children, a tragedy that reverberates over four decades, the daily intimacies of marriage, and the power of forgiveness.

How much can a family forgive?

Francis Gleeson and Brian Stanhope, rookie cops in the NYPD, live next door to each other outside the city. What happens behind closed doors in both houses—the loneliness of Francis’s wife, Lena, and the instability of Brian’s wife, Anne, sets the stage for the explosive events to come.

Ask Again, Yes is a deeply affecting exploration of the lifelong friendship and love that blossoms between Kate Gleeson and Peter Stanhope, born six months apart. One shocking night their loyalties are divided, and their bond will be tested again and again over the next 40 years. Luminous, heartbreaking, and redemptive, Ask Again, Yes reveals the way childhood memories change when viewed from the distance of adulthood—villains lose their menace and those who appeared innocent seem less so. Kate and Peter’s love story, while haunted by echoes from the past, is marked by tenderness, generosity, and grace.


Archival Futures
by Caroline Brown

This book draws on the contributions of a range of international experts to consider the current archival landscape and imagine the archive of the future. Firmly rooted in current professional debate and scholarship, Archival Futures offers thought provoking and accessible chapters that aim to challenge and inspire archivists globally and to encourage debate about their futures.
It is widely acknowledged that the archive profession/discipline is facing a time of change. The digital world has presented changes in how records are created, used, stored and communicated. At the same time, there is increased public debate over issues such as ownership of and access to information and its authenticity and reliability in a networked and interconnected world. On a practical level archivists are being asked to do more, to have a greater range of skills, often with increasingly restricted resources while competing with others to maintain their role as experts in ever changing environments.
Exploring the potential impact of these changes is timely. Such reflections will provide the opportunity to consider the archivists’ purpose and role, discuss the practical impact of change on skills and functions and to articulate what can be contributed to a mid 21 century world.
The contributors, Kate Theimer, Luciana Duranti, Victoria Lemieux, Geoffrey Yeo, Jenny Bunn, Sonia Ranade, Barbara Reed, Gillian Oliver, Frank Upward, Joanne Evans, Michael Moss, David Thomas and Craig Gauld cover:

  • the role of archives in relation to individuals, organisations, communities and society
  • how appraisal, arrangement, description and access might be affected in the future
  • the impact of changing societal expectations in terms of access to information, how information is exchanged, and how things are recorded and remembered
  • the place of traditional archives and what ‘the archive’ is or might become
  • competition or opportunity offered by other information, cultural or IT related professions and the future role of the archive profession
  • truth and post-truth: archives as authentic and reliable evidence

This book will appeal to an international audience of students, academics and practitioners in archival science, records management, and library and information science.