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3M Online Library

E-book Platforms for Libraries
by Mirela Roncevic

E-book vendors continue to experiment: adjustments to business models, consolidation of  content, and mergers with competitors mean constant change. What’s good for innovation can equal confusion when it comes to choosing an e-book platform for your library. Making a sound purchasing decision requires research and close consideration of trade-offs, and Roncevic’s new issue of Library Technology Reports will get you started. Based on surveys of e-book vendors with an established presence in academic, public, and/or K–12  library markets, this report includes

  • Background and business model descriptions for 51 leading e-book vendors
  • Four tables comparing content, technical specifications, functionality, and business  models
  • An at-a-glance overview of platforms, including vendor website URLs
  • Bulleted  checklists of factors to consider, and questions to ask vendors
  • An  examination of the blurring channels of publisher, aggregator, and distributor platforms,  with advice to help you avoid content overlap

The Role of Trade Literature in Sci-tech Libraries
by Ellis Mount

Here is a unique volume on the relationship between sci-tech materials and trade literature, commonly called manufacturers’catalogs. Because very little has been published about the value and nature of trade literature in regard to sci-tech libraries, this volume will be important in informing librarians about a little-known segment of the larger picture of sci-tech information sources, thus adding to the value of their services to their clients.

The Role of Trade Literature in Sci-Tech Libraries addresses the problems of handling sci-tech trade literature in a corporate technical library, a large public library, and a government library devoted to American history. Experts offer practical advice on selecting and organizing trade literature and on managing the growth and extent of a collection of trade literature. They discuss modern literature and older publications, which often have great historical value. Libraries that collect both old and new materials are identified, as are publishers of trade literature. The book also focuses on how a publisher of classic trade literature views its role.

Of interest to any professional in the information science field, this practical volume will be particularly valuable to managers of corporate sci-tech libraries, managers of library collections in Americana, and beginning librarians who are learning about trade literature.

Library Science and Administration: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications
by Management Association, Information Resources

Effective administration of libraries is a crucial part of delivering library services to the public. To develop and implement best practices, librarians must be aware and informed of the recent advances in library administration.

Library Science and Administration: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications is a comprehensive reference source for the latest scholarly material on trends, techniques, and management of libraries and examines the benefits and challenges of library administration. Highlighting a range of pertinent topics such as digital libraries, information sciences, and academic libraries, this multi-volume book is ideally designed for academicians, researchers, practitioners, and librarians seeking current research on library science and administration.


Cloud Computing and Virtualization Technologies in Libraries
by Dhamdhere, Sangeeta N.

The emergence of open access, web technology, and e-publishing has slowly transformed modern libraries into digital libraries. With this variety of technologies utilized, cloud computing and virtual technology has become an advantage for libraries to provide a single efficient system that saves money and time.

Cloud Computing and Virtualization Technologies in Libraries highlights the concerns and limitations that need addressed in order to optimize the benefits of cloud computing to the virtualization of libraries. Focusing on the latest innovations and technological advancements, this book is essential for professionals, students, and researchers interested in cloud library management and development in different types of information environments.


Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
by David Shafer

David Shafer”s acclaimed Whiskey Tango Foxtrot– A brilliant, visionary and deeply human cyber-thriller
Deep in the forest near Burma”s border with China, a young woman sees something she wasn”t supposed to see.
In Portland, Oregon, a troubled young man crashes his bicycle on his way to work – and then gets fired.
In New York, a famous self-help author goes on daytime TV – and suddenly conceives ”a book that would take him beyond talk shows”.
What connects these three people – though they don”t know it yet – is that they have come to the attention of the Committee, a global cabal that seeks to privatize all information. And each of them will, in their different ways, come to take part in the secret resistance struggle spearheaded by a scarily clever hacktivist collective – a struggle built on radical politics, classic spycraft and eye-popping technology. Along the way, they are forced to confront their own demons, reconsider their values, and contemplate the meaning of love, family, friendship and community. Whiskey Tango Foxtrotis at once a page-turning thriller, a deeply absorbing psychological novel, and a visionary exploration of the possibilities and hazards of our online lives.
”A paranoid, sarcastic and clattering pop thriller that reads as if it were torn from the damp pages of Glenn Greenwald”s fever journal … Reading Shafer”s prose is like popping a variant of the red pill in The Matrix– everything gets a little crisper” New York Times
Genius techno–thriller la Neal Stephenson, powered by social-media info-conspiracy la Dave Eggers” Time
A stylish, absorbing, sharply modern hybrid of techno-thriller and psychodrama that bristles with wit and intellect” Maggie Shipstead, author of Seating Arrangements”A fine example of what happens when big, brainy ideas are successfully mated with good old-fashioned plot thrust … The next time the Fiction is Dead brigade demand to know why novels deserve a place in popular culture, the constant reader might well cite this book as Exhibit A for the defence” Irish Times
”Exciting, funny, moving and thought-provoking” Irish Independent
%%%Deep in the forest near Burma”s border with China, a young woman sees something she wasn”t supposed to see.

In Portland, Oregon, a troubled young man crashes his bicycle on his way to work – and then gets fired.

In New York, a famous self-help author goes on daytime TV – and suddenly conceives ”a book that would take him beyond talk shows”.

What connects these three people – though they don”t know it yet – is that they have come to the attention of the Committee, a global cabal that seeks to privatize all information. And each of them will, in their different ways, come to take part in the secret resistance struggle spearheaded by a scarily clever hacktivist collective – a struggle built on radical politics, classic spycraft and eye-popping technology.

Along the way, they are forced to confront their own demons, reconsider their values, and contemplate the meaning of love, family, friendship and community. Whiskey Tango Foxtrotis at once a page-turning thriller, a deeply absorbing psychological novel, and a visionary exploration of the possibilities and hazards of our online lives.
%%%Deep in the forest near Burma”s border with China, a young woman sees something she wasn”t supposed to see.
In Portland, Oregon, a troubled young man crashes his bicycle on his way to work – and then gets fired.
In New York, a famous self-help author goes on daytime TV – and suddenly conceives ”a book that would take him beyond talk shows”.
What connects these three people – though they don”t know it yet – is that they have come to the attention of the Committee, a global cabal that seeks to privatize all information. And each of them will, in their diff


Libraries Beyond Their Institutions
by Rita Pellen, William Miller

Discover collaborative possibilities for your library beyond mere memberships in bibliographic utilities

Libraries Beyond Their Institutions: Partnerships That Work illustrates the remarkable range of cooperative activities in which libraries are engaged in order to provide the best possible service. Increasingly, librarians recognize the need to link their institutions to the world around them as part of their obligation to enhance the integration of digital information, not only for students in academic settings, but also throughout all levels of society. An excellent companion and complement to Libraries Within Their Institutions: Creative Collaborations (Haworth) from the same editors, this unique book examines the variety of ways librarians work with community organizations, government agencies, professional organizations, minority communities, and city governments in their efforts to serve not just students in academic settings, but all of society.

Libraries Beyond Their Institutions: Partnerships That Work reflects the growing understanding of the key role played by libraries in the development of civil society. This unique book examines the variety of possibilities for collaborations outside institutions, including the ways librarians function in a variety of other campus settings, such as writing centers, teaching excellence centers, and academic departments in support of teaching, learning, and research; partnerships with graduate school, and information resources management to preserve theses and dissertations electronically; promoting civic partnerships; initiating a campus-wide information literacy resource; and partnering with government agencies to form a data literacy program.

Libraries Beyond Their Institutions: Partnerships That Work provides practical information on:

  • collaborative training programs to develop baseline competencies in academic libraries to support data services
  • the Chicano/Latino Network and the Community Digital Initiative
  • developing an international presence through digital resource sharing
  • successful models of statewide library consortia
  • technology-based partnerships
  • promoting K-20 information literacy
  • collaborations between the United States Patent and Trademark Office and patent and trademark depository libraries (PTDL)
  • the development of AgEcon Search, an alternative method of delivering research results

Libraries Beyond Their Institutions: Partnerships That Work is an invaluable resource for librarians working in academic, school, special, and public settings, and for library science faculty and students.


The Goldfinch
by Donna Tartt

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction 2014

Aged thirteen, Theo Decker, son of a devoted mother and a reckless, largely absent father, survives an accident that otherwise tears his life apart. Alone and rudderless in New York, he is taken in by the family of a wealthy friend. He is tormented by an unbearable longing for his mother, and down the years clings to the thing that most reminds him of her: a small, strangely captivating painting that ultimately draws him into the criminal underworld. As he grows up, Theo learns to glide between the drawing rooms of the rich and the dusty antiques store where he works. He is alienated and in love – and his talisman, the painting, places him at the centre of a narrowing, ever more dangerous circle.

The Goldfinch is a haunted odyssey through present-day America and a drama of enthralling power. Combining unforgettably vivid characters and thrilling suspense, it is a beautiful, addictive triumph – a sweeping story of loss and obsession, of survival and self-invention, of the deepest mysteries of love, identity and fate.


The Japanese Lover
by Isabel Allende

From New York Times bestselling author Isabel Allende, “a magical and sweeping” (Publishers Weekly, starred review) love story and multigenerational epic that stretches from San Francisco in the present-day to Poland and the United States during World War II.

In 1939, as Poland falls under the shadow of the Nazis, young Alma Belasco’s parents send her away to live in safety with an aunt and uncle in their opulent mansion in San Francisco. There, as the rest of the world goes to war, she encounters Ichimei Fukuda, the quiet and gentle son of the family’s Japanese gardener. Unnoticed by those around them, a tender love affair begins to blossom. Following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the two are cruelly pulled apart as Ichimei and his family—like thousands of other Japanese Americans—are declared enemies and forcibly relocated to internment camps run by the United States government. Throughout their lifetimes, Alma and Ichimei reunite again and again, but theirs is a love that they are forever forced to hide from the world.

Decades later, Alma is nearing the end of her long and eventful life. Irina Bazili, a care worker struggling to come to terms with her own troubled past, meets the elderly woman and her grandson, Seth, at San Francisco’s charmingly eccentric Lark House nursing home. As Irina and Seth forge a friendship, they become intrigued by a series of mysterious gifts and letters sent to Alma, eventually learning about Ichimei and this extraordinary secret passion that has endured for nearly seventy years.

Sweeping through time and spanning generations and continents, The Japanese Lover is written with the same keen understanding of her characters that Isabel Allende has been known for since her landmark first novel The House of the Spirits. The Japanese Lover is a moving tribute to the constancy of the human heart in a world of unceasing change.


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Online Library Instruction

Creating and Sharing Online Library Instruction
by Joelle Pitts, Sara K. Kearns, Heather Collins

The authors offer a model for building online library instruction that can be reused, repurposed, and remixed across classes, departments, and even institutions. Although the information landscape is continually evolving, the practices, tips and suggestions found in these pages should help readers through the decision making processes for a sustainable instructional model.

Fundamentals of Library Instruction
by Monty L. McAdoo

Being a great teacher is part and parcel of being a great librarian. In this book, veteran instruction services librarian McAdoo lays out the fundamentals of the discipline in easily accessible language. Succinctly covering the topic from top to bottom, he Offers an overview of the historical context of library instruction, drawing on recent research in learning theory to help the instructor choose the most effective strategies for any situation Shows readers how to assess the information needs of a given audience, how to develop a curriculum for teaching information literacy, and how to fit an appropriate amount of content into the allotted time Addresses the pros and cons of online versus face-to-face instruction Includes methods for publicizing the availability of the library’s learning opportunities With expert guidance for putting theory into practice, McAdoo’s book helps librarians connect with students as effectively as possible.

Transforming Academic Library Instruction
by Amanda Nichols Hess

Academic librarians working in instruction are at the crux of professional, higher educational, and societal change. While they work with disciplinary faculty to ensure learners are critical information consumers and producers in 21st century ways, how do academic librarians develop a sense of their own identities as post-secondary instructors? Using both broad and in-depth data from practicing instruction librarians, this book identifies the catalysts and influences in academic librarians’ perspective development process. From these factors, then, instruction librarians and librarians-to-be can hone their own instructional identities and transform their teaching practices.

This focus on understanding this perspective transformation process around instructional identities offers both working academic librarians and LIS graduate students an innovative way to think about their roles as educators. While many books explore the practical or how-to aspects of teaching in libraries, Transforming Academic Librarianship: How to Hone Your Instructional Identity and Adopt Best Teaching Practice takes a step up and examines how academic librarians think about or approach instruction as a part of their work. Through explicating this metacognitive process, this book helps both academic librarians and librarians-to-be to more intentionally consider their teaching practices and professional identities.


Changing the Scope of Library Instruction in the Digital Age
by Bhattacharyya, Swati, Patnaik, K Rama

The current digital age is impacting the contents and delivery of instructional service in many ways. Instructional sessions not only describe various features of a resource, but these sessions also bring issues like the ethical use of information, copyrights, and the value of open knowledge to light. Librarians are required to help users to learn use these tools.

Changing the Scope of Library Instruction in the Digital Age provides emerging information on data visualization tools, creating effective instructions, and instructional design in library sciences. While highlighting the challenges of effectively training new and seasoned librarians in these various aspects of data technology and teaching methods, readers will learn the importance of giving librarians the tools they need to complete their new responsibilities. This book is an important resource for entry level and seasoned librarians, researchers, and instructional design specialists seeking current research on up to date library instruction in the modern technology age.


Curriculum-Based Library Instruction
by Amy Blevins, Megan Inman

The rampant nature of technology has caused a shift in information seeking behaviors. In addition, current trends such as evidence based medicine and information literacy mean that one time instructional sessions cannot provide our patrons with all of the skills they need. For this reason, many librarians are working to develop curriculum based instruction that is semester long or consisting of many sessions throughout an academic program. In addition to teaching, librarians are also becoming embedded in the curriculums they support by serving as web-based course designers, problem-based learning facilitators, or members of curriculum committees.
Although it is fairly obvious that library instruction is important and that librarians should be equipped to provide this instruction, the majority of ALA accredited programs offer only one course on library instruction, the courses are only available as electives, and they are often only offered once a year. Librarians need to gain their instructional experiences through real life experiences, mentors, and of course, books like this one. Many books commonly discuss one-shot sessions and provide tips for getting the most out of that type of instruction. There are not as many that discuss curriculum based instruction in a section, let alone an entire book.

Curriculum-Based Library Instruction: From Cultivating Faculty Relationships to Assessment highlights the movement beyond one-shot instruction sessions, specifically focusing on situations where academic librarians have developed curriculum based sessions and/or become involved in curriculum committees.

This volume describes and provides examples of librarians’ varied roles in the curriculum of education programs. These roles include semester long or multi-session instructor, web-based course designer, problem-based learning facilitator, and member of a curriculum committee. In addition to describing the roles that librarians have in supporting curriculum, the book describes how to carry out those roles with sections devoted to adult learning theory, teaching methods, developing learning objectives, and working with faculty to develop curriculum. Examples of library sessions devoted to information literacy, evidence based practice, information literacy, and biomedical informatics are included. This book is not limited to one mode of delivering information and covers examples of face to face, distance and blended learning initiatives.


Library Instruction
by Susan Deese-Roberts, Kathleen Keating

Changing technologies and diversifying populations have meant a higher demand for library instruction at most academic libraries. This book demonstrates how you can meet that demand by using peer tutors to support and enhance your library services. Peer tutors can teach library patrons online search concepts and skills and how to use other specific research tools. This practical, step-by-step plan for developing and implementing a peer tutoring program can improve library services and make your job easier.


Critical Library Instruction
by Maria T. Accardi, Emily Drabinski, Alana Kumbier

Bringing together the voices of a range of practicing librarians, this collection illuminates theories and methods of critical pedagogy and library instruction. Chapters address critical approaches to standards and assessment practices, links between queer, anti-racist and feminist pedagogies and the library classroom, intersections of critical theories of power and knowledge and the library, and the promise and peril of reflective instruction practices. Rooted in theoretical work both from within the profession (James Elmborg, Cushla Kapitzke) and without (Paolo Freire, Henry Giroux, Deborah Britzman), contributions are complemented by stories of critical approaches put into practice in institutional settings ranging from the community college classroom to large urban research universities to virtual worlds. The intention is to begin a conversation among librarians who teach, library instruction program coordinators, faculty and instructors interested in bringing librarians into the classroom, and librarians interested in developing liberatory and anti-oppressive professional practices.

Library Instruction Design
by Di Su

The design philosophies of Google and Apple represent different approaches to new product design. Google’s model features bottom-up and data-driven decision-making processes, while Apple’s model is to design and build products top-down. Library instruction program design may learn from these differing but complementary approaches. Inspired by Google’s and Apple’s success, Library Instruction Design details how library instruction program design may learn from the philosophy of product design in the business world. In designing library instruction, a Google-philosophy approach teaches what the user wants to know while an Apple-philosophy approach teaches what the librarian thinks the user needs to learn. These two design philosophies aim at different teaching objectives reflecting library and information science education in modern society. The book is divided into five sections, with opening sections covering library instruction, the philosophy of library instruction design and design philosophy from different angles. Later sections discuss applying Google’s model and applying Apple’s model.

  • Offers a creative way to think about library instruction program design
  • Suggests two design approaches grounded in two philosophies, represented by the design approaches of Google and Apple
  • Details the differences and complementarities between top-down and bottom-up approaches to design

Curriculum-Based Library Instruction
by Amy Blevins, Megan Inman

The rampant nature of technology has caused a shift in information seeking behaviors. In addition, current trends such as evidence based medicine and information literacy mean that one time instructional sessions cannot provide our patrons with all of the skills they need. For this reason, many librarians are working to develop curriculum based instruction that is semester long or consisting of many sessions throughout an academic program. In addition to teaching, librarians are also becoming embedded in the curriculums they support by serving as web-based course designers, problem-based learning facilitators, or members of curriculum committees.
Although it is fairly obvious that library instruction is important and that librarians should be equipped to provide this instruction, the majority of ALA accredited programs offer only one course on library instruction, the courses are only available as electives, and they are often only offered once a year. Librarians need to gain their instructional experiences through real life experiences, mentors, and of course, books like this one. Many books commonly discuss one-shot sessions and provide tips for getting the most out of that type of instruction. There are not as many that discuss curriculum based instruction in a section, let alone an entire book.

Curriculum-Based Library Instruction: From Cultivating Faculty Relationships to Assessment highlights the movement beyond one-shot instruction sessions, specifically focusing on situations where academic librarians have developed curriculum based sessions and/or become involved in curriculum committees.

This volume describes and provides examples of librarians’ varied roles in the curriculum of education programs. These roles include semester long or multi-session instructor, web-based course designer, problem-based learning facilitator, and member of a curriculum committee. In addition to describing the roles that librarians have in supporting curriculum, the book describes how to carry out those roles with sections devoted to adult learning theory, teaching methods, developing learning objectives, and working with faculty to develop curriculum. Examples of library sessions devoted to information literacy, evidence based practice, information literacy, and biomedical informatics are included. This book is not limited to one mode of delivering information and covers examples of face to face, distance and blended learning initiatives.


The One-shot Library Instruction Survival Guide
by Heidi E. Buchanan, Beth A. McDonough

Faced with planning a one-shot library instruction session, librarians can feel hard-pressed to squeeze in all their library has to offer along with tips on the research process. Authentic learning with student interaction may seem unattainable in only an hour. But it’s not. The keys are communicating clearly with the course instructor, developing a realistic plan, and employing effective teaching strategies. With more than 30 years’ combined experience in teaching information literacy, Buchanan and McDonough invite librarians to turn everyday challenges into instruction that is meaningful and relevant for students. Supplying the knowledge and tools to make it happen, their guide provides communication and collaboration strategies to help librarians co-design information literacy sessions with course instructors, including conversation starters and talking points; helps librarians focus on how to provide the most useful, relevant library instruction within the limited timeframe of a one-shot session; presents active learning strategies and classroom assessment techniques that facilitate meaningful learning; shows how to match the best hands-on activities to students’ stage in the research process; gives solutions to common problems, like handling a less-than-ideal teaching environment, what to do when you’re running short of time, and dealing with difficult students; suggests practical ways to use teaching strategies as assessment, enabling librarians to improve teaching and learning; and offers numerous real-world examples and case studies of one-shot library instruction. Filled with invaluable guidance based on decades of classroom experience, wisdom from the literature, and voices from the field, this resource will help librarians become better, more confident teachers.–From Amazon.com.

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Online Library Assistant Jobs

Working in the Virtual Stacks
by Laura Townsend Kane

Thanks in part to technology, the boundaries of library positions are dissolving. It is no longer practical to discuss the profession in terms of traditional library types, and in today’s library, the relationship between librarians and technology is stronger than ever. In this informative volume, veteran author Kane interviews dozens of practicing librarians who are highly involved with technology as part of their day-to-day jobs. Revealing the full richness of the profession, Kane * Profiles web-services librarians in all types of settings, from veterinary medicine and law to astronomy, market research, and cataloging * Offers insights into career opportunities in the library world by challenging traditional notions of what a librarian does * Shows examples of real-world librarianship in the fields of technology instruction, digital futures, virtual libraries, and even librarians as entrepreneurs Written in a warm and personal style, Working in the Virtual Stacks presents an exciting future for librarians, already upon us today!

Straight from the Stacks
by Laura Townsend Kane

For library students, paraprofessionals, and librarians who are wondering if they have their ladder against the right wall, Straight from the stacks fills the need for an up-to-date resource that uncovers the amazing and varied jobs available in the library field. Encompassing both traditional and nontraditional career paths in libraries, this comprehensive and engaging guide makes it easy to get a grip on these and other information science career path questions. Organized by type of institution including public, school, academic, nontraditional, medical/law, and library administration. Kane covers the many areas of librarianship and typical jobs in each environment and provides practical answers to the common questions: Should I move ahead for that MLIS? Where can I go with this advanced degree in library science? What else is out there? Am I on the right career path? What experience and training do I need? Tracing career paths, everyday duties, and qualities for succeeding, this useful overview offers anyone entering the profession inspiration as well as hard-hitting career-building information. First-hand accounts from real-life librarians in a variety of information science di

So You Want To Be a Librarian
by Lauren Pressley

Librarians tend to love their work and consider librarianship a great career. This book is by a talented librarian who wants to introduce people, especially people searching for the right career, to the profession. It answers such questions as: What do librarians do? What are the different types of libraries and professional jobs in libraries? What are librarians all about and what hot issues do they discuss in their professional lives? What do I do to become a librarian? What are some important things to know once I’m in a masters program in library science? This book is an essential introduction to the profession for someone who is at the point of choosing a career.

Mostly Dead Things
by Kristen Arnett

A New York Times Bestseller

“This book is my song of the summer.” —Parul Sehgal, The New York Times

A Most Anticipated Book of 2019 at Esquire, The Week, BuzzFeed, NYLON, Bustle, HuffPost, The Boston Globe, and more.

One morning, Jessa-Lynn Morton walks into the family taxidermy shop to find that her father has committed suicide, right there on one of the metal tables. Shocked and grieving, Jessa steps up to manage the failing business, while the rest of the Morton family crumbles. Her mother starts sneaking into the shop to make aggressively lewd art with the taxidermied animals. Her brother Milo withdraws, struggling to function. And Brynn, Milo’s wife—and the only person Jessa’s ever been in love with—walks out without a word. As Jessa seeks out less-than-legal ways of generating income, her mother’s art escalates—picture a figure of her dead husband and a stuffed buffalo in an uncomfortably sexual pose—and the Mortons reach a tipping point. For the first time, Jessa has no choice but to learn who these people truly are, and ultimately how she fits alongside them.  

Kristen Arnett’s debut novel is a darkly funny, heart-wrenching, and eccentric look at loss and love.


Recruitment, Retention and Restructuring
by Association of College and Research Libraries. Ad Hoc Task Force on Recruitment & Retention Issues

This is a book about librarian and faculty collaboration – as it exists now and as it could exist. In a series of essays, the authors assert that collaboration will be the next great transition in higher education. The possibilities of librarians working across disciplines and traditional university boundaries are explored. Included are a review of the literature, case studies of exemplary programs at the institutional level, reports of surveys of informal collaborations, a directory of resources, as well as theoretical models of the collaborative enterprise.

Occupational Outlook Handbook 2014-15
by United States. Department of Labor, United States. Bureau of Labor Statistics

“Reflects the latest employment projections”–P. [4] of cover.

Felt in the Jaw
by Kristen N. Arnett

In her debut story collection, Kristen Arnett, with dark humor, explores the lives of queer women and their families in the light of the bleak Florida sun. A young dancer suddenly loses language while her family struggles to understand their new roles. A mother endures a horrifying spider bite while camping with her daughters in the backyard. A family reunion goes sour when a group of cousins are left to their own devices. In these ten stories, outward strength is always betrayed by deep vulnerability: these are characters so desperate for family and connection that they often isolate themselves–and sometimes, it’s the world isolating them.

Building Libraries for the 21st Century
by T.D. Webb

Despite calls for electronic, virtual, digital libraries without walls, the walled variety are still being built, some of them massive. This book explores the reasons for this contradiction by examining several notable new library facilities around the world to see how modern expectations for libraries are being translated into concrete and steel. More and more libraries are looking at change not as a dreaded hazard but as an opportunity that can itself be seized to strengthen the library in the areas of mission, technologies, facilities, funding, and organizational structure. Thirteen libraries are discussed—by a librarian or administrator who worked on the project. Each author writes about the design and building concerns that were particularly relevant to that library: philosophy, political issues, or any other concerns that affected planning, building, and services in the new facility. Introductory and concluding chapters identify underlying values and themes, tying everything together. The unique combinations of issues, constraints, and opportunities show how libraries are planning to fit into the approaching era of virtual information delivery.

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Online Library Science Degree

Academic Library Management
by Tammy Nickelson Dearie, Michael Meth, Elaine L. Westbrooks

 What does successful academic library management look like in the real world?  A team of editors, all administrators at large research libraries, here present a selection of case studies which dive deeply into the subject to answer that question. Featuring contributions from a range of practicing academic library managers, this book

spotlights case studies equally useful for LIS students and current managers;touches upon such key issues as human resource planning, public relations, financial management, organizational culture, and ethics and confidentiality;examines how to use project management methodology to reorganize technical services, create a new liaison service model, advance a collaborative future, and set up on-the-spot mentoring;discusses digital planning for archives and special collections;rejects "one size fits all" solutions to common challenges in academic libraries in favor of creative problem solving; andprovides guidance on how to use case studies as effective models for positive change at one’s own institution.

LIS instructors, students, and academic library practitioners will all find enrichment from this selection of case studies.


Special Librarianship
by Wilfred Ashworth

Comprehensive outline of the administration and management of special libraries.

Health Librarianship: An Introduction
by Jeffrey T. Huber, Feili Tu-Keefner Ph.D.

With health care reform and the Affordable Care Act driving up demand for ready access to health and biomedical information by both health care providers and healthcare consumers, health librarianship plays a critical role in facilitating access to that information. Health Librarianship: An Introduction places health librarianship within the health care context, covering librarianship within this specific environment as well as other perspectives relevant to health librarianship.

The book addresses the basic functions of librarianship—for example, management and administration, public services, and technical services—within the health care context as well as issues unique to health librarianship like health literacy, consumer health, and biomedical informatics. This book is an outstanding textbook for library and information sciences classes and will also be of interest to those considering a career change to health librarianship.


Understanding Information
by Arthur Jack Meadows

This volume illustrates the basic principles of information science, to provide a general introduction to the subject, through a series of selected and interesting examples. It touches on a variety of issues, including Intranets and knowledge management. All those who are involved in the turbulent changes in the information field will find a picture of how information and its concepts operate in contemporary society.

Charleston Voices
by Lars Meyer

The Charleston Conference is an informal annual gathering of librarians, publishers, electronic resource managers, consultants, and vendors of library materials in Charleston, SC, in November, to discuss issues of importance to them all. It is designed to be a collegial gathering of individuals from different areas who discuss the same issues in a non-threatening, friendly, and highly informal environment. Presidents of companies discuss and debate with library directors, acquisitions librarians, reference librarians, serials librarians, collection development librarians, and many, many others. Begun in 1980, the Charleston Conference has grown from 20 participants in 1980 to almost 2,000 in 2017. From the librarian of a small library to the CEO of a major corporation, they all stand and make their voices heard. The tone is casual, the talk irreverent, and the answers are far from simple. But together, we can find solutions. In this annual volume we have collected many key issues that were discussed in 2017.
TESTIMONIALS

“The best library gathering around. I look forward to it.”

“The Charleston Conference is an incredibly stimulating venue. I am tired afterwards, but get so many great ideas, network with my colleagues, and learn what is going on. I recommend it highly.”

“Charleston is the only conference that is worth attending.”

https://www.charlestonlibraryconference.com/about/


Evaluating Information Systems
by Zahir Irani, Peter Love

The adoption of Information Technology (IT) and Information Systems (IS) represents significant financial investments, with alternative perspectives to the evaluation domain coming from both the public and private sectors.

As a result of increasing IT/IS budgets and their growing significance within the development of an organizational infrastructure, the evaluation and performance measurement of new technology remains a perennial issue for management. This book offers a refreshing and updated insight into the social fabric and technical dimensions of IT/IS evaluation together with insights into approaches used to measure the impact of information systems on its stakeholders. In doing so, it describes the portfolio of appraisal techniques that support the justification of IT/IS investments.

Evaluating Information Systems explores the concept of evaluation as an evolutionary and dynamic process that takes into account the ability of enterprise technologies to integrate information systems within and between organisations. In particular, when set against a backdrop of organisational learning. It examines the changing portfolio of benefits, costs and risks associated with the adoption and diffusion of technology in today’s global marketplace. Finally approaches to impact assessment through performance management and benchmarking is discussed.


Dictionary for Library and Information Science
by Joan M. Reitz

What began in 1994 as a five-page handout, the Dictionary of Library and Information Science soon was expanded and converted to electronic format for installation on the Western Connecticut State University Library Web site, where it is in high demand by library professionals, scholars, and students, and has won international praise. Now available for the first time in print, the Dictionary is the most comprehensive and reliable English-language resource for terminology used in all types of libraries. With more than 4,000 terms and cross-references (last updated in January of 2003), the Dictionary’s content has been carefully selected and includes terms from publishing, printing, literature, and computer science where, in the author’s judgment, they are relevant to both library professionals and laypersons. The primary criterion for including a new term is whether library and information science professionals might reasonably be expected to encounter it at some point in their career, or be required to know its meaning.


Research at Library and Information Science
by A. Gopikuttan, K. P. Vijayakumar

This book – written for researchers, teachers, students, and information managers – is a compendium of 16 studies in the category of applied research in Library and Information Science. The topics include: bibliometrics * user studies * manpower studies * total quality management * knowledge management * the role of library associations * e-book aggregators * ‘Theory Y’ * and more.

Restoring the Promise
by Richard K. Vedder

American higher education is increasingly in trouble. Universities are facing an uncertain and unsettling future with free speech suppression, out-of-control Federal student aid programs, soaring administrative costs, and intercollegiate athletics mired in corruption. Restoring the Promise explores these issues and exposes the federal government’s role in contributing to them. With up-to-date discussions of the most recent developments on university campuses, this book is the most comprehensive assessment of universities in recent years.

What Do Employers Want? A Guide for Library Science Students
by Priscilla K. Shontz, Richard A. Murray

While library schools provide graduates with a solid understanding of library science concepts, many diploma holders have no clear plan for finding a desirable job with their knowledge The information in What Do Employers Want? A Guide for Library Science Students will be extremely valuable for students currently in Masters of Library Science program as well as recent recipients of MLS degrees, regardless of what kind of work environment they wish to work in.

The book guides readers through the process of planning a job search step-by-step. Divided into two major sections—the student experience and the job search—the authors provide critical advice derived from their combined 30 years of real-world, in-the-field experience. Specific topics include choosing classes, gaining practical experience while in school, establishing a professional image, gaining skills that make applicants more marketable, writing effective resumes and cover letters, interviewing, and negotiating a job offer.