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A Gentleman in Moscow
by Amor Towles

The mega-bestseller with more than 1.5 million readers that is soon to be a major television series

“The novel buzzes with the energy of numerous adventures, love affairs, [and] twists of fate.” —The Wall Street Journal

He can’t leave his hotel. You won’t want to.

From the New York Times bestselling author of Rules of Civility–a transporting novel about a man who is ordered to spend the rest of his life inside a luxury hotel.

In 1922, Count Alexander Rostov is deemed an unrepentant aristocrat by a Bolshevik tribunal, and is sentenced to house arrest in the Metropol, a grand hotel across the street from the Kremlin. Rostov, an indomitable man of erudition and wit, has never worked a day in his life, and must now live in an attic room while some of the most tumultuous decades in Russian history are unfolding outside the hotel’s doors. Unexpectedly, his reduced circumstances provide him entry into a much larger world of emotional discovery.

Brimming with humor, a glittering cast of characters, and one beautifully rendered scene after another, this singular novel casts a spell as it relates the count’s endeavor to gain a deeper understanding of what it means to be a man of purpose.


Best Android Apps
by Mike Hendrickson, Brian Sawyer

You can choose from thousands of apps to make your Android device do just about anything you can think of — and probably a few things you’d never imagine. There are so many Android apps available, in fact, that it’s been difficult to find the best of the bunch — until now.

Best Android Apps leads you beyond the titles in Android Market’s “Top Paid” and “Top Free” bins to showcase apps that will truly delight, empower, and entertain you. The authors have tested and handpicked more than 200 apps and games, each listed with a description and details highlighting the app’s valuable tips and special features. Flip through the book to browse their suggestions, or head directly to the category of your choice to find the best apps to use at work, on the town, at play, at home, or on the road.

Discover great Android apps to help you:

  • Juggle tasks
  • Connect with friends
  • Play games
  • Organize documents
  • Explore what’s nearby
  • Get in shape
  • Travel the world
  • Find new music
  • Dine out
  • Manage your money

…and much more!


House to House
by David Bellavia

On 8 November 2004, the largest battle of the War on Terror began, with the US Army’s assault on Fallujah and its network of tens of thousands of insurgents hiding in fortified bunkers, on rooftops, and inside booby-trapped houses. For Sgt. David Bellavia of 3rd Platoon, Alpha Company, it quickly turned into a battle on foot, from street to street and house to house. On the second day, he and his men laid siege to a mosque, only to be driven to a rooftop and surrounded, before heavy artillery could smash through to rescue them. By the third day, Bellavia charges an insurgent-filled house and finds himself trapped with six enemy fighters. One by one, he shoots, wrestles, stabs, and kills five of them, until his men arrive to take care of the final target. It is one of the most hair-raising battle stories of any age — yet it does not spell the end of Bellavia’s service. It would take serveral more weeks before the Battle of Fallujah finally came to a close, with Bellavia, miraculously, alive.

In the words of the author: “HOUSE TO HOUSE holds nothing back. It is a raw, gritty look at killing and combat and how men react to it. It is gut-wrenching, shocking and brutal. It is honest. It is not a glorification of war. Yet it will not shy from acknowledging this: sometimes it takes something as terrible as war for the full beauty of the human spirit to emerge.”


City of Thieves
by David Benioff

From the critically acclaimed author of The 25th Hour and When the Nines Roll Over and co-creator of the HBO series Game of Thrones, a captivating novel about war, courage, survival — and a remarkable friendship that ripples across a lifetime.

During the Nazis’ brutal siege of Leningrad, Lev Beniov is arrested for looting and thrown into the same cell as a handsome deserter named Kolya. Instead of being executed, Lev and Kolya are given a shot at saving their own lives by complying with an outrageous directive: secure a dozen eggs for a powerful Soviet colonel to use in his daughter’s wedding cake. In a city cut off from all supplies and suffering unbelievable deprivation, Lev and Kolya embark on a hunt through the dire lawlessness of Leningrad and behind enemy lines to find the impossible.

By turns insightful and funny, thrilling and terrifying, the New York Times bestseller City of Thieves is a gripping, cinematic World War II adventure and an intimate coming-of-age story with an utterly contemporary feel for how boys become men.


Library Lion
by Michelle Knudsen, Kevin Hawkes

An affectionate storybook tribute to that truly wonderful place: the library.

Miss Merriweather, the head librarian, is very particular about rules in the library. No running allowed. And you must be quiet. But when a lion comes to the library one day, no one is sure what to do. There aren’t any rules about lions in the library. And, as it turns out, this lion seems very well suited to library visiting. His big feet are quiet on the library floor. He makes a comfy backrest for the children at story hour. And he never roars in the library, at least not anymore. But when something terrible happens, the lion quickly comes to the rescue in the only way he knows how. Michelle Knudsen’s disarming story, illustrated by the matchless Kevin Hawkes in an expressive timeless style, will win over even the most ardent of rule keepers.

From the Hardcover edition.


Flat Stanley: On Ice
by Jeff Brown

Flat Stanley and Arthur are excited to go ice-skating on the frozen lake. But when the weather suddenly warms up, Stanley finds himself skating on thin ice! Beginning readers will love following along with Flat Stanley’s winter adventure.

Flat Stanly: On Ice is a Level Two I Can Read book, geared for kids who read on their own but still need a little help.


The Night Circus
by Erin Morgenstern

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER 
Two starcrossed magicians engage in a deadly game of cunning in The Night Circus, the spellbinding bestseller that has captured the world’s imagination. 

The circus arrives without warning. No announcements precede it. It is simply there, when yesterday it was not. Within the black-and-white striped canvas tents is an utterly unique experience full of breathtaking amazements. It is called Le Cirque des Rêves, and it is only open at night.

But behind the scenes, a fierce competition is underway: a duel between two young magicians, Celia and Marco, who have been trained since childhood expressly for this purpose by their mercurial instructors. Unbeknownst to them both, this is a game in which only one can be left standing. Despite the high stakes, Celia and Marco soon tumble headfirst into love, setting off a domino effect of dangerous consequences, and leaving the lives of everyone, from the performers to the patrons, hanging in the balance.

Look for Erin Morgenstern’s new novel, The Starless Sea, coming November 2019. 


Your Home Library
by Kathie Coblentz

For the general book lover, someone whose ardor for the printed word has led to stacks of yet-to-be-read volumes on floors and other surfaces, here’s a great, enjoyable way to keep track of them all. This comprehensive kit draws upon the expertise of one of the world’s greatest libraries, the only facility of its kind with both world-class research and circulating collections. It includes a CD containing custom software to organize and record your book collection by title, author, subject, location on your bookshelf, and numerous additional useful categories. Also included are beautiful bookplates, an instruction manual, and an instructive volume on creating and organizing home libraries, written by an experience librarian. The 96-page book celebrates the myriad of joys of being a book lover, and addresses such issues as evaluating and organizing a collection, and keeping it in place with bookends and shelves; caring for books, and the art of loaning books that are actually returned.

Where the Bodies Are Buried
by Christopher Brookmyre

The murder of a small-time Scottish hoodlum makes big trouble for two Glasgow detectives in a thriller that’ll “wake up crime fiction readers everywhere” (Val McDermid).
 
When a neighborhood heroin dealer turns up dead one fine morning in Scotland, no one is too surprised. Sleeping with a major drug trafficker’s girlfriend can bring around plenty of enemies. It’s no wonder that Detective Superintendent Catherine McLeod has plenty of early leads.
 
If only out-of-work actress Jasmine Sharp could get a lead. With a career in nosedive, she’s learning the ropes at her uncle Jim’s PI business. But when Jim goes missing, Sharp is thrown into the deep end. To find him she’ll have to solve his most recent case—and do it solo.
 
Following the trail quickly leads Sharp into the crosshairs of an unknown assailant—and headed down the same road as McLeod. When their investigations become intertwined, “Glasgow’s mean streets come alive . . . [in] one of the best novels of the year” (John Lutz, New York Times–bestselling and Edgar award–winning author).
 
“[For] fans of Lynda La Plante’s Prime Suspect series and HBO’s The Wire.” —Library Journal
 
“Tough Scottish humor . . . leavened with Elmore Leonard-like flourishes . . . finely controlled yet exuberant mayhem.” —The Christian Science Monitor

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A Gentleman in Moscow
by Amor Towles

The mega-bestseller with more than 1.5 million readers that is soon to be a major television series

“The novel buzzes with the energy of numerous adventures, love affairs, [and] twists of fate.” —The Wall Street Journal

He can’t leave his hotel. You won’t want to.

From the New York Times bestselling author of Rules of Civility–a transporting novel about a man who is ordered to spend the rest of his life inside a luxury hotel.

In 1922, Count Alexander Rostov is deemed an unrepentant aristocrat by a Bolshevik tribunal, and is sentenced to house arrest in the Metropol, a grand hotel across the street from the Kremlin. Rostov, an indomitable man of erudition and wit, has never worked a day in his life, and must now live in an attic room while some of the most tumultuous decades in Russian history are unfolding outside the hotel’s doors. Unexpectedly, his reduced circumstances provide him entry into a much larger world of emotional discovery.

Brimming with humor, a glittering cast of characters, and one beautifully rendered scene after another, this singular novel casts a spell as it relates the count’s endeavor to gain a deeper understanding of what it means to be a man of purpose.


Your Home Library
by Kathie Coblentz

For the general book lover, someone whose ardor for the printed word has led to stacks of yet-to-be-read volumes on floors and other surfaces, here’s a great, enjoyable way to keep track of them all. This comprehensive kit draws upon the expertise of one of the world’s greatest libraries, the only facility of its kind with both world-class research and circulating collections. It includes a CD containing custom software to organize and record your book collection by title, author, subject, location on your bookshelf, and numerous additional useful categories. Also included are beautiful bookplates, an instruction manual, and an instructive volume on creating and organizing home libraries, written by an experience librarian. The 96-page book celebrates the myriad of joys of being a book lover, and addresses such issues as evaluating and organizing a collection, and keeping it in place with bookends and shelves; caring for books, and the art of loaning books that are actually returned.

Library Lion
by Michelle Knudsen, Kevin Hawkes

An affectionate storybook tribute to that truly wonderful place: the library.

Miss Merriweather, the head librarian, is very particular about rules in the library. No running allowed. And you must be quiet. But when a lion comes to the library one day, no one is sure what to do. There aren’t any rules about lions in the library. And, as it turns out, this lion seems very well suited to library visiting. His big feet are quiet on the library floor. He makes a comfy backrest for the children at story hour. And he never roars in the library, at least not anymore. But when something terrible happens, the lion quickly comes to the rescue in the only way he knows how. Michelle Knudsen’s disarming story, illustrated by the matchless Kevin Hawkes in an expressive timeless style, will win over even the most ardent of rule keepers.

From the Hardcover edition.


The Goldfinch
by Donna Tartt

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction 2014

Aged thirteen, Theo Decker, son of a devoted mother and a reckless, largely absent father, survives an accident that otherwise tears his life apart. Alone and rudderless in New York, he is taken in by the family of a wealthy friend. He is tormented by an unbearable longing for his mother, and down the years clings to the thing that most reminds him of her: a small, strangely captivating painting that ultimately draws him into the criminal underworld. As he grows up, Theo learns to glide between the drawing rooms of the rich and the dusty antiques store where he works. He is alienated and in love – and his talisman, the painting, places him at the centre of a narrowing, ever more dangerous circle.

The Goldfinch is a haunted odyssey through present-day America and a drama of enthralling power. Combining unforgettably vivid characters and thrilling suspense, it is a beautiful, addictive triumph – a sweeping story of loss and obsession, of survival and self-invention, of the deepest mysteries of love, identity and fate.


Fancy Nancy Big Book
by Jane O’Connor

No one knows fancy like Nancy.


The Japanese Lover
by Isabel Allende

From New York Times bestselling author Isabel Allende, “a magical and sweeping” (Publishers Weekly, starred review) love story and multigenerational epic that stretches from San Francisco in the present-day to Poland and the United States during World War II.

In 1939, as Poland falls under the shadow of the Nazis, young Alma Belasco’s parents send her away to live in safety with an aunt and uncle in their opulent mansion in San Francisco. There, as the rest of the world goes to war, she encounters Ichimei Fukuda, the quiet and gentle son of the family’s Japanese gardener. Unnoticed by those around them, a tender love affair begins to blossom. Following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the two are cruelly pulled apart as Ichimei and his family—like thousands of other Japanese Americans—are declared enemies and forcibly relocated to internment camps run by the United States government. Throughout their lifetimes, Alma and Ichimei reunite again and again, but theirs is a love that they are forever forced to hide from the world.

Decades later, Alma is nearing the end of her long and eventful life. Irina Bazili, a care worker struggling to come to terms with her own troubled past, meets the elderly woman and her grandson, Seth, at San Francisco’s charmingly eccentric Lark House nursing home. As Irina and Seth forge a friendship, they become intrigued by a series of mysterious gifts and letters sent to Alma, eventually learning about Ichimei and this extraordinary secret passion that has endured for nearly seventy years.

Sweeping through time and spanning generations and continents, The Japanese Lover is written with the same keen understanding of her characters that Isabel Allende has been known for since her landmark first novel The House of the Spirits. The Japanese Lover is a moving tribute to the constancy of the human heart in a world of unceasing change.


The Darling Songbirds
by Rachael Herron

She’s almost forgotten how to write the songs that made her famous…

"Relationships are at the heart of women’s fiction, and Herron could teach a master class on creating them." Chicklit Central

From international bestseller Rachael Herron, comes a book too delightful to put down:

Adele Darling has washed up in the sleepy gold-rush town her great-grandfather had given his name to, the town she’d left for good a long time ago. The saloon is a ruin, the business is broke and customers are scarce. Add into the mix Nate Houston – the handsome, guitar-playing bartender who had always believed he would be the next owner of the Golden Spike – and Adele has one potent cocktail on her hands.

This heartwarming, hilarious, and red-hot contemporary romance will leave you wishing for a marina view (or a hot cowboy) of your very own.

Scroll up and click Buy Now!


Innovation in Public Libraries
by Kirstie Nicholson

Innovation in Public Libraries: Learning from International Library Practice examines the recent activities of successful and innovative libraries around the world, presenting their initiatives in areas including library design, events and programs, and creating customer experiences. This timely guide provides an overview of these libraries’ successful experiences and identifies emerging global trends and themes. The author offers library practitioners guidance on how to pursue these trends in their own library environment, identifying achievable goals when planning building and design improvements, and developing customer interactions in order to emulate the experiences of international libraries.

  • Presents a range of successful and innovative practices in one book, covering library innovation in building design, programs and events, and in customer experience and approach
  • Provides an international perspective on library activities, with libraries in different countries discussed
  • Analyzes the experiences of various libraries to identify common trends and themes
  • Provides practical advice for librarians who wish to emulate the activities of the libraries discussed, with recommended goals to action
  • Examines both the big picture of emerging global trends and themes, as well as highlighting the daily experiences of individual libraries

Law Librarianship in the Digital Age
by Ellyssa Kroski

It is absolutely essential that today’s law librarians are digitally literate in addition to possessing an understanding and awareness of recent advancements and trends in information technology as they pertain to the library field. Law Libraries in the Digital Age offers a one-stop, comprehensive guide to achieving both of those goals.

This go-to resource covers the most cutting-edge developments that face today’s modern law libraries, including e-Books, mobile device management, Web scale discovery, cloud computing, social software, and much more. These critical issues and concepts are approached from the perspective of tech-savvy library leaders who each discuss how forward-thinking libraries are tackling such traditional library practices as reference, collection development, technical services, and administration in this new “digital age.”

Each chapter explores the key concepts and issues that are currently being discussed at major law library conferences and events today and looks ahead to what’s on the horizon for law libraries in the future. Chapters have been written by the field’s top innovators from all areas of legal librarianship, including academic, government, and private law libraries, who have strived to provide inspiration and guidance to tomorrow’s law library leaders.


The Purpose-Based Library: Finding Your Path to Survival, Success, and Growth
by John J. Huber, Steven V. Potter

 In the years since John Huber’s trailblazing Lean Library Management was published, budget pressures on libraries have only increased. Yet libraries who have adopted his strategies have turned conventional management thinking—that if budgets are reduced, customer service suffers—on its head. These libraries have proven that by streamlining and improving customer services, they can eliminate wasteful activities and bring down costs. In The Purpose-Based Library, Huber and seasoned public library administrator Potter build on insight gleaned from decades of experience to demonstrate how libraries can create real growth opportunities through concentrating on their true mission and purpose, and without spending a lot more money. With a focus on putting ideas into action, they point the way towards

New ways to think about metricsReexamining customer self-driven servicesEffectively leveraging the considerable footprint of librariesIdentifying and assessing community needs and realigning library services accordinglyActively encouraging community fundraisingOffering cutting-edge services and programsPacked with boots-on-the-ground commentary, this book presents strategies to help libraries survive and succeed.


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A Gentleman In Moscow

A Gentleman in Moscow
by Amor Towles

The mega-bestseller with more than 1.5 million readers that is soon to be a major television series

“The novel buzzes with the energy of numerous adventures, love affairs, [and] twists of fate.” —The Wall Street Journal

He can’t leave his hotel. You won’t want to.

From the New York Times bestselling author of Rules of Civility–a transporting novel about a man who is ordered to spend the rest of his life inside a luxury hotel.

In 1922, Count Alexander Rostov is deemed an unrepentant aristocrat by a Bolshevik tribunal, and is sentenced to house arrest in the Metropol, a grand hotel across the street from the Kremlin. Rostov, an indomitable man of erudition and wit, has never worked a day in his life, and must now live in an attic room while some of the most tumultuous decades in Russian history are unfolding outside the hotel’s doors. Unexpectedly, his reduced circumstances provide him entry into a much larger world of emotional discovery.

Brimming with humor, a glittering cast of characters, and one beautifully rendered scene after another, this singular novel casts a spell as it relates the count’s endeavor to gain a deeper understanding of what it means to be a man of purpose.


Rules of Civility
by Amor Towles

The New York Times bestselling novel that “enchants on first reading and only improves on the second” (The Philadelphia Inquirer)

This sophisticated and entertaining first novel presents the story of a young woman whose life is on the brink of transformation. On the last night of 1937, twenty-five-year-old Katey Kontent is in a second-rate Greenwich Village jazz bar when Tinker Grey, a handsome banker, happens to sit down at the neighboring table. This chance encounter and its startling consequences propel Katey on a year-long journey into the upper echelons of New York society—where she will have little to rely upon other than a bracing wit and her own brand of cool nerve. With its sparkling depiction of New York’s social strata, its intricate imagery and themes, and its immensely appealing characters, Rules of Civility won the hearts of readers and critics alike.


Summary of the Gentleman in Moscow
by Amor Towles, The Summary Guy

The Gentleman in Moscow: A Complete Summary! The Gentleman in Moscow is a novel written by Amore Towles. The novel’s plot is set in the beginning of the 20th century Russian Empire and follows the story of Count Alexander Ilyich Rostov and his life in the Hotel Metropol where he has been under house arrest for thirty-two years. The 20th century was one of the most turbulent times in the history of Europe. Old political systems were deemed obsolete. People wanted change; they wanted rights for all, not just for the wealthy. In the Russian Empire ‘old and new’ clashed in blood, violence, and death. During the 20th century, being noble was not very popular in Russia. Communists slowly but surely gained more and more trust from the people. Since their agenda blamed several groups of people for every misfortune that happened, being a count became very dangerous. Alexander Ilyich Rostov knows this. He almost gets killed but is saved at the last moment in the most peculiar way. An interesting novel, filled with historical segments, The Gentleman in Moscow is more than just a story of one man. It is a story of survival and uncertainty in dire times. Here Is A Preview Of What You Will Get: – A summarized version of the book. – You will find the book analyzed to further strengthen your knowledge. – Fun multiple choice quizzes, along with answers to help you learn about the book. Get a copy, and learn everything about The Gentleman in Moscow.

Summary, Analysis & Review of Amor Towles’s A Gentleman in Moscow by Instaread
by Instaread

Summary, Analysis & Review of Amor Towles’s A Gentleman in Moscow by Instaread

 

Preview:

 

A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles is the story of a Russian aristocrat-turned-waiter who lives 32 years of his life under house arrest at the Hotel Metropol in Moscow. Set in post-revolutionary Russia, the novel follows its protagonist, Count Alexander Ilyich Rostov, as he develops new friendships, family, and loves, all while confined within the walls of the Metropol.

In 1922, in the wake of the Russian Revolution, Rostov, originally a gentleman from Russia’s Nizhny Novgorod province, is deemed a threat to the Communist Party and sentenced to house arrest at the hotel where he has been living in luxury. The party is suspicious of Count Rostov, who left Russia after the tsar’s execution in 1918, but returned four years later. What saves Rostov from being executed is a single poem published in 1913 espousing revolutionary ideals, to which he claims authorship…

 

PLEASE NOTE: This is a Summary, Analysis & Review of the book and NOT the original book.

 

Inside this Summary, Analysis & Review of Amor Towles’s A Gentleman in Moscow by Instaread

 

·                      Summary of the Book

·                      Important People

·                      Character Analysis

·                      Analysis of the Themes and Author’s Style

 

About the Author

With Instaread, you can get the key takeaways, summary and analysis of a book in 15 minutes. We read every chapter, identify the key takeaways and analyze them for your convenience. 

Visit our website at instaread.co. 


A Gentleman in Moscow
by Amor Towles

“”In all ways a great novel, a nonstop pleasure brimming with charm, personal wisdom, and philosophic insight.this book more than fulfills the promise of Towles’ stylish debut, Rules of Civility.” – Kirkus Reviews (starred) From the New York Times bestselling author of Rules of Civility–a transporting novel about a man who is ordered to spend the rest of his life inside a luxury hotel With his breakout debut novel, Rules of Civility, Amor Towles established himself as a master of absorbing, sophisticated fiction, bringing late 1930s Manhattan to life with splendid atmosphere and a flawless command of style. Readers and critics were enchanted; as NPR commented, “Towles writes with grace and verve about the mores and manners of a society on the cusp of radical change.” A Gentleman in Moscow immerses us in another elegantly drawn era with the story of Count Alexander Rostov. When, in 1922, he is deemed an unrepentant aristocrat by a Bolshevik tribunal, the count is sentenced to house arrest in the Metropol, a grand hotel across the street from the Kremlin. Rostov, an indomitable man of erudition and wit, has never worked a day in his life, and must now live in an attic room while some of the most tumultuous decades in Russian history are unfolding outside the hotel’s doors. Unexpectedly, his reduced circumstances provide him a doorway into a much larger world of emotional discovery. Brimming with humor, a glittering cast of characters, and one beautifully rendered scene after another, this singular novel casts a spell as it relates the count’s endeavor to gain a deeper understanding of what it means to be a man of purpose”–

Eve in Hollywood
by Amor Towles

The further adventures of Eve Ross, best friend of Katey Kontent in Rules of Civility, the New York Times bestselling novel by Amor Towles
 
Coming this fall, A Gentleman in Moscow – the highly anticipated new novel from Amor Towles

Near the end of Amor Towles’s bestselling novel Rules of Civility, the fiercely independent Evelyn Ross boards a train from New York to Chicago to visit her parents, but never disembarks. Six months later, she appears in a photograph in a gossip magazine exiting the Tropicana Club on Sunset Boulevard on the arm of Olivia de Havilland.

In this novella made up of six richly detailed and atmospheric stories, each told from a different perspective, Towles unfolds the events that take Eve to the heart of Old Hollywood. Beginning in the dining car of the Golden State Limited in September 1938, we follow Eve to the elegant rooms of the Beverly Hills Hotel, the fabled tables of Antonio’s, the amusement parks on the Santa Monica piers, the afro-Cuban dance clubs off Central Avenue, and ultimately the set of Gone with the Wind.

With the glamour and grit of the studio system’s golden age as a backdrop, Towles introduces in each story a memorable new character whose fate may well be altered by their encounter with Eve. In following the thread of these varied encounters, we watch as Eve forges a new and unexpected life for herself in late 1930s Los Angeles.


Our Man in Moscow
by Robert A.D. Ford

“The world is large; Russia is great; death is inevitable.”

Almost forty years ago Robert A.D. Ford came across this sentence in a Russian school primer. It stays with him today as an example of the Russian psyche, a psyche that Ford is better equipped to explain than most. He is the only Western diplomat to have known and dealt with all the Soviet leaders from the end of the Second World War to the present: Stalin, Krushchev, Brezhnev, Gorbachev. As a poet and translator of Russian poetry, he also had a special entrée into the Soviet literary world. In this memoir he offers a unique perspective on post-war Soviet politics and Russian life.


Please Kill Me
by Legs McNeil, Gillian McCain

“Ranks up there with the great rock & roll books of all time.”—Time Out New York

“Lurid, insolent, disorderly, funny, sometimes gross, sometimes mean and occasionally touching . . . Resounds with authenticity.”—The New York Times

“No volume serves juicier dish on punk’s New York birth . . . Tales of sex, drugs and music that will make you wish you’d been there.”—Rolling Stone

A contemporary classic, Please Kill Me is the definitive oral history of the most nihilistic of all pop movements. Iggy Pop, Richard Hell, the Ramones, and scores of other punk figures lend their voices to this decisive account of that explosive era. This 20th anniversary edition features new photos and an afterword by the authors.

“Utterly and shamelessly sensational.”—Newsday


Measure for Measure
by William Shakespeare

The New Cambridge Shakespeare appeals to students worldwide for its up-to-date scholarship and emphasis on performance. The series features line-by-line commentaries and textual notes on the plays and poems. Introductions are regularly refreshed with accounts of new critical, stage and screen interpretations. For this second edition of Measure for Measure Angela Stock has written a new introductory section that takes account of recent scholarly criticism and important contemporary productions on stage and film. The edition retains the text prepared by Brian Gibbons together with his comprehensive introduction, in which he shows how the play’s critical reception and stage history varies from one period to the next according to the prevailing social, moral and religious issues of the day. Gibbons explores the thrilling experience of watching the play in performance, with its shocking reversals and surprises, great tragic poetry and exuberant comic prose. An updated reading list completes the edition.