Posted on

5. A Library’s Online Catalog Is A Computerized Index Of

Criminal Justice Research in Libraries and on the Internet
by Bonnie R. Nelson, Marilyn Lutzker

Library research has changed dramatically since Marilyn Lutzker and Eleanor Ferrall’s Criminal Justice Research in Libraries was published in 1986. In addition to covering the enduring elements of traditional research, this new edition provides full coverage of research using the World Wide Web, hypertext documents, computer indexes, and other online resources. It gives an in-depth explanation of such concepts as databases, networks, and full text, and the Internet gets a full chapter. The chapters on bibliographic searching, the library catalog, and comparative research are almost totally new, and chapters on indexes and abstracts, newsletters, newspapers and news broadcasts, documents, reports and conference proceedings, and statistics reflect the shift to computerized sources. The chapter on legal resources discusses the wealth of legal information available on the Internet. A new chapter on library research in forensic science corrects an omission from the first book.

With the growth of computerized indexes and the Internet, more and more researchers are admitting that they feel inadequate to the new tools. Librarians themselves are struggling to keep abreast of the new technology. This book will help students, practitioners, scholars, and librarians develop a sense of competency in doing criminal justice research.


Legal Research: How to Find and Understand the Law
by Suzanne McKie

Many students and first-time practitioners may know of certain legal textbooks which cover a certain area, but do not know where to look to update the knowledge these books provide. Similarly, a legal problem may arise which is not generally covered by such books. This work deals with how to find the answers, how to update an answer, how to discover if those cases have been applied since judgement was given, how to find statutes and regulators, and how to research and understand the law.

Technical Communication
by Paul V. Anderson

Thousands of students have successfully improved their writing and design skills using Anderson’s TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION: A READER-CENTERED APPROACH. Known for its treatment of the rhetorical situation and coverage of usability and persuasion, this edition contains new chapters and an innovative, visually oriented design that will engage today’s students.
Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Basic Library Skills, 5th ed.
by Carolyn Wolf

This brand new edition of Wolf’s acclaimed work provides a self-contained, short course in essential library skills for patrons of college, high school and public libraries. The intent is to provide a quick and easy way to learn to do library research. The exercises contained herein give students hands-on experience by applying rules stated in the text to situations that approach real “research problems.” Subjects addressed include a brief tour of the library; card catalogs and cataloging systems; filing rules; online public access catalogs; subject searching; bibliographies; book reviews and parts of a book; dictionaries; encyclopedias; handbooks; atlases; gazetteers; periodicals; newspapers; online database searching and reference sources; literature and criticism; e-books; government information and government documents; biographies; business, career and consumer information; non-print materials and special services; online computer use in libraries and schools; and hints for writing term papers. Instructors considering this book for use in a course may request an examination copy here.

Encyclopedia of Library and Information Science
by Allen Kent, Harold Lancour

“The Encyclopedia of Library and Information Science provides an outstanding resource in 33 published volumes with 2 helpful indexes. This thorough reference set–written by 1300 eminent, international experts–offers librarians, information/computer scientists, bibliographers, documentalists, systems analysts, and students, convenient access to the techniques and tools of both library and information science. Impeccably researched, cross referenced, alphabetized by subject, and generously illustrated, the Encyclopedia of Library and Information Science integrates the essential theoretical and practical information accumulating in this rapidly growing field.”

Next-gen Library Catalogs
by Marshall Breeding

Today’s Web-savvy users often bypass traditional library catalogs for more interactive, tech-friendly interfaces. Help your library stand out within the crowded landscape of information providers with Marshall Breeding’s new, highly practical guide to interactive next-generation library catalogs. Learn how to give your users access to a wide selection of print and electronic content with this jargon-free, step-by-step guide. Breeding outlines the important functions and features of next-gen catalogs, briefs you on all of the available commercial and open source software, and helps you select which products are right for your library’s next-gen catalog. You’ll learn to lay the groundwork for practical implementation, integrate the catalog into your existing technological environment, address a multitude of common implementation issues and concerns, and assess the impact of your Catalog so you can demonstrate the change you led. There is a thorough glossary with definitions for all key terms, and as with all the Tech Set guides, material is presented in a manner that is both accessible to non-technical professionals and useful for systems librarians.

Technology Transfer Systems in the United States and Germany
by Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research, National Academy of Engineering

This book explores major similarities and differences in the structure, conduct, and performance of the national technology transfer systems of Germany and the United States. It maps the technology transfer landscape in each country in detail, uses case studies to examine the dynamics of technology transfer in four major technology areas, and identifies areas and opportunities for further mutual learning between the two national systems.

International Students and Academic Libraries
by Diane E. Peters

The growing emphasis on globalization in the context of higher education has resulted in changes in academic curricula, increasing numbers of global partnerships, and in more concentrated efforts to recruit international students at North American universities. This book focuses on the impact of these efforts on academic libraries. The introductory essay addresses issues faced by both international students and by librarians who work with them. The student-related issues include general culture shock, communication and language concerns, learning styles, differences between libraries in North America and those in other parts of the world, and library anxiety. Library-related issues include responding to language, technological, and cultural barriers; responding to specific culture-based concerns; classroom communication; outreach; and staff training.

Suggestions are offered as to ways to make the relationship between students and librarians more positive and productive. The annotated bibliography provides an overview of the literature on the topic, covering such issues as basic library orientation; bibliographic instruction/information literacy; collection development; computers and the internet; language and communication; marketing and outreach; reference services; and staff development and training, including staff exchanges and international visits. Author and subject indexes are appended.


Posted on

4. A Library’s Online Catalog Is A Computerized Index Of

Criminal Justice Research in Libraries and on the Internet
by Bonnie R. Nelson, Marilyn Lutzker

Library research has changed dramatically since Marilyn Lutzker and Eleanor Ferrall’s Criminal Justice Research in Libraries was published in 1986. In addition to covering the enduring elements of traditional research, this new edition provides full coverage of research using the World Wide Web, hypertext documents, computer indexes, and other online resources. It gives an in-depth explanation of such concepts as databases, networks, and full text, and the Internet gets a full chapter. The chapters on bibliographic searching, the library catalog, and comparative research are almost totally new, and chapters on indexes and abstracts, newsletters, newspapers and news broadcasts, documents, reports and conference proceedings, and statistics reflect the shift to computerized sources. The chapter on legal resources discusses the wealth of legal information available on the Internet. A new chapter on library research in forensic science corrects an omission from the first book.

With the growth of computerized indexes and the Internet, more and more researchers are admitting that they feel inadequate to the new tools. Librarians themselves are struggling to keep abreast of the new technology. This book will help students, practitioners, scholars, and librarians develop a sense of competency in doing criminal justice research.


The Reference Library User
by William A. Katz, Bill Katz

Provide the best possible service to your library patrons. With a healthy respect for those who seek assistance at the reference desk, a group of library and information service specialists examine the public whom they serve. The Reference Library User focuses on the possible interactions between the reference librarian and the library user. The authoritative contributors discuss many problems in the relationship between the public and the library, and all offer suggestions that will at least help librarians to better serve the public on a daily basis.

A major emphasis of The Reference Library User is on the various populations using the library and their particular needs. For example, one chapter examines the information needs of deinstitutionalized patrons and presents methods of providing service and a rationale for community outreach. The state program in Rhode Island is outlined, describing efforts to reach community residents through public libraries and the state operated Bookmobile. Other chapters provide strategies for providing reference services to older adults, the learning disabled, the blind, and the physically handicapped.

This informative new volume also deals with general concerns facing librarians today, including determining the audience for both public and academic libraries, educating the user, encouraging nonusers to become library users, and calming irate patrons.

Reference librarians will be particularly interested in the problems and solutions discussed in this new volume, as will library managers and administrators who will always benefit from a fresh perspective on public service for the library user.

Community Practice
by David A. Hardcastle

For almost two decades, Community Practice has been a definitive text for social workers, community practitioners, and students eager to help individuals contribute to and use community resources or work to change oppressive community structures. In this third edition, a wealth of new charts and cases spotlight the linkages between theoretical orientations and practical skills, with an enhanced emphasis on the inherently political nature of social work and community practice. Boxes, examples, and exercises illustrate the range of skills and strategies available to savvy community practitioners in the 21st century, including networking, marketing and staging, political advocacy, and leveraging information and communication technologies. Other features include: – New material on community practice ethics, critical practice skills, community assessment and assets inventory and mapping, social problem analysis, and applying community ractice skills to casework practice – Consideration of post-9/11 community challenges – Discussion on the changing ethnic composition of America and what this means for practitioners – An exploration of a vastly changed political landscape following the election of President Obama, the Great Recession, the rise of the Tea Party, and the increasing political and corporate use of pseudo-grassroots endeavors – A completely revamped instructor’s manual available online at www.oup.com/us/communitypractice This fully revised classic text provides a comprehensive and integrated overview of the community theory and skills fundamental to all areas of social work practice. Broad in scope and intensive in analysis, it is suitable for undergraduate as well as graduate study. Community Practice offers students and practitioners the tools necessary to promote the welfare of individuals and communities by tapping into the ecological foundations of community and social work practice.

Encyclopedia of Library and Information Science
by Allen Kent, Harold Lancour

The Biological Literature to An Uncertainty Principle for Information Seeking: A Qualitative Approach

Principles of Research in Behavioral Science
by Bernard E. Whitley, Jr., Mary E. Kite

This book provides a comprehensive overview of research methods in the behavioral sciences, focusing primarily on the conceptual issues inherent in conducting research. It covers topics that are often omitted from other texts, including measurement issues, correlational research, qualitative research, and integrative literature reviews. The book also includes discussions of diversity issues as they related to behavioral science research. New to this edition are chapter boxes that focus on applied issues related to each chapter topic. Throughout the book, readable examples and informative tables and figures are provided. The authors also take a contemporary approach to topics such as research ethics, replication research, and data collection (including internet research).


Principles of Research in Behavioral Science
by Bernard E. Whitley, Mary E. Kite

Intended for beginning graduate or advanced undergraduate students, this book provides a comprehensive review of research methods used in psychology and related disciplines. It covers topics that are often omitted in other texts including correlational and qualitative research and integrative literature reviews. Basic principles are reviewed for those who need a refresher. The focus is on conceptual issues ¿ statistics are kept to a minimum. Featuring examples from all fields of psychology, the book addresses laboratory and field research. Chapters are written to be used independently, so instructors can pick and choose those that fit their course needs. Reorganized to parallel the steps of the research process, tips on writing reports are also provided. Each chapter features an outline, key terms, a summary, and questions and exercises that integrate chapter topics and put theory into practice. A glossary and an annotated list of readings are now included.

Extensively updated throughout, the new edition features a new co-author, Mary Kite, and:
¿ New chapters on qualitative research and content analysis and another on integrative literature reviews including meta-analysis, critical techniques for today¿s research environment.
¿ A new chapter on exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis that addresses the use of path analysis and structural equation modeling.
¿ A new chapter on how to write a research report using APA style.
¿ Examples from cross-cultural and multi-cultural research, neuroscience, cognitive, and developmental psychology along with ones from social, industrial, and clinical psychology.
¿ More on Internet research and studies.
¿ Greatly expanded Part 3 on research designs with chapters on true experiments, field research, correlational and single-case designs, content analysis, and survey and qualitative research.
¿ A website with PowerPoint slides for each chapter, a test bank with short answer and multiple choice questions, additional teaching resources, and the tables and figures from the book for Instructor¿s and chapter outlines, suggested readings, and links to related web sites for students.

Intended as a text for beginning graduate and/or advanced undergraduate courses in research methods or experimental methods or design taught in psychology, human development, family studies, education, or other social and behavioral sciences, a prerequisite of undergraduate statistics and a beginning research methods course is assumed.


The Analytical Writer
by Adrienne Robins

In The Analytical Writing Adrienne Robins explains college writing as a process of discovery, as a series of strategies that any college student can learn to apply. All strategies explained in this text are based on sound theories of teaching writing and on the patterns of successful writers. Writing and thinking should not be separated, and presenting only the steps without the accompanying explanation of how they influence thinking would be of little more help than having no method at all. By using this text the students will see as they plan, draft, and revise how their writing helps clarify their thoughts. This clearly written and engaging textbook is illustrated by real examples of student writing and appropriate cartoons. The second edition was revised and updated based on the large-scale evaluation of the first edition completed by professors and students. The new edition reflects four essential values: recognizing the diversity of writing processes, the necessity of peer and teacher interaction with the writer on drafts, the integration of writing and reading, and the appropriate uses of technology. Specific features of this second edition include: -new writing samples -electronic citation formats -updated library use chapter with technological guidance -concise paragraph chapter -revised introduction and conclusion chapter -rhetorical as well as grammatical explanations for punctuation usage -new cartoons -exercises drawn from students’ papers -a condensed chapter on research papers -and an expanded, and clearer, chapter on special assignments and other writing tasks A Collegiate Press book

Windows 7 For Dummies
by Andy Rathbone

The perfect plain-English guide to the much-anticipated release of Windows 7

Whether you’re new to computers or just eager to start using the newest version of Windows, Windows For Dummies, Enhanced Edition answers all your questions about the changes and new tools in Windows 7, enhanced with detailed video tutorials. Windows expert Andy Rathbone walks you step by step through the most common Windows 7 tasks, including managing files, applications, media, and Internet access. You’ll learn how to navigate the interface, customize the desktop, and work with the file system. You’ll then go deeper into the system, discovering new features and improvements, and finding tips and techniques for getting the most out of Windows 7.

  • Covers basic management of applications, files, and data; creating and printing documents; setting up an Internet connection and e-mail account; and online security
  • Includes specially produced videos explaining features and illustrating techniques in greater depth
  • Explores using Windows to edit and manage audio, video, and photo files, and how to create CDs, DVDs, and playlists with Media Center
  • Helps you tweak and customize Windows 7 to operate your way and set up user accounts, build a home network, and maintain your PC
  • Provides troubleshooting advice, helps you find missing files and use the Help system, and explains common error messages

Windows 7 For Dummies, Enhanced Edition will have you up and running on the newest version of Windows quickly and easily.


Posted on

1. A Library’s Online Catalog Is A Computerized Index Of

Criminal Justice Research in Libraries and on the Internet
by Bonnie R. Nelson, Marilyn Lutzker

Library research has changed dramatically since Marilyn Lutzker and Eleanor Ferrall’s Criminal Justice Research in Libraries was published in 1986. In addition to covering the enduring elements of traditional research, this new edition provides full coverage of research using the World Wide Web, hypertext documents, computer indexes, and other online resources. It gives an in-depth explanation of such concepts as databases, networks, and full text, and the Internet gets a full chapter. The chapters on bibliographic searching, the library catalog, and comparative research are almost totally new, and chapters on indexes and abstracts, newsletters, newspapers and news broadcasts, documents, reports and conference proceedings, and statistics reflect the shift to computerized sources. The chapter on legal resources discusses the wealth of legal information available on the Internet. A new chapter on library research in forensic science corrects an omission from the first book.

With the growth of computerized indexes and the Internet, more and more researchers are admitting that they feel inadequate to the new tools. Librarians themselves are struggling to keep abreast of the new technology. This book will help students, practitioners, scholars, and librarians develop a sense of competency in doing criminal justice research.


Principles of Research in Behavioral Science
by Bernard E. Whitley, Jr., Mary E. Kite

This book provides a comprehensive overview of research methods in the behavioral sciences, focusing primarily on the conceptual issues inherent in conducting research. It covers topics that are often omitted from other texts, including measurement issues, correlational research, qualitative research, and integrative literature reviews. The book also includes discussions of diversity issues as they related to behavioral science research. New to this edition are chapter boxes that focus on applied issues related to each chapter topic. Throughout the book, readable examples and informative tables and figures are provided. The authors also take a contemporary approach to topics such as research ethics, replication research, and data collection (including internet research).


MEDOC
by

Index of U.S. government literature on health statistics and research information and health care delivery and education material for the lay public.

The Reference Library User
by William A. Katz, Bill Katz

Provide the best possible service to your library patrons. With a healthy respect for those who seek assistance at the reference desk, a group of library and information service specialists examine the public whom they serve. The Reference Library User focuses on the possible interactions between the reference librarian and the library user. The authoritative contributors discuss many problems in the relationship between the public and the library, and all offer suggestions that will at least help librarians to better serve the public on a daily basis.

A major emphasis of The Reference Library User is on the various populations using the library and their particular needs. For example, one chapter examines the information needs of deinstitutionalized patrons and presents methods of providing service and a rationale for community outreach. The state program in Rhode Island is outlined, describing efforts to reach community residents through public libraries and the state operated Bookmobile. Other chapters provide strategies for providing reference services to older adults, the learning disabled, the blind, and the physically handicapped.

This informative new volume also deals with general concerns facing librarians today, including determining the audience for both public and academic libraries, educating the user, encouraging nonusers to become library users, and calming irate patrons.

Reference librarians will be particularly interested in the problems and solutions discussed in this new volume, as will library managers and administrators who will always benefit from a fresh perspective on public service for the library user.

Principles of Research in Behavioral Science
by Bernard E. Whitley, Mary E. Kite

Intended for beginning graduate or advanced undergraduate students, this book provides a comprehensive review of research methods used in psychology and related disciplines. It covers topics that are often omitted in other texts including correlational and qualitative research and integrative literature reviews. Basic principles are reviewed for those who need a refresher. The focus is on conceptual issues ¿ statistics are kept to a minimum. Featuring examples from all fields of psychology, the book addresses laboratory and field research. Chapters are written to be used independently, so instructors can pick and choose those that fit their course needs. Reorganized to parallel the steps of the research process, tips on writing reports are also provided. Each chapter features an outline, key terms, a summary, and questions and exercises that integrate chapter topics and put theory into practice. A glossary and an annotated list of readings are now included.

Extensively updated throughout, the new edition features a new co-author, Mary Kite, and:
¿ New chapters on qualitative research and content analysis and another on integrative literature reviews including meta-analysis, critical techniques for today¿s research environment.
¿ A new chapter on exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis that addresses the use of path analysis and structural equation modeling.
¿ A new chapter on how to write a research report using APA style.
¿ Examples from cross-cultural and multi-cultural research, neuroscience, cognitive, and developmental psychology along with ones from social, industrial, and clinical psychology.
¿ More on Internet research and studies.
¿ Greatly expanded Part 3 on research designs with chapters on true experiments, field research, correlational and single-case designs, content analysis, and survey and qualitative research.
¿ A website with PowerPoint slides for each chapter, a test bank with short answer and multiple choice questions, additional teaching resources, and the tables and figures from the book for Instructor¿s and chapter outlines, suggested readings, and links to related web sites for students.

Intended as a text for beginning graduate and/or advanced undergraduate courses in research methods or experimental methods or design taught in psychology, human development, family studies, education, or other social and behavioral sciences, a prerequisite of undergraduate statistics and a beginning research methods course is assumed.


Next-gen Library Catalogs
by Marshall Breeding

Today’s Web-savvy users often bypass traditional library catalogs for more interactive, tech-friendly interfaces. Help your library stand out within the crowded landscape of information providers with Marshall Breeding’s new, highly practical guide to interactive next-generation library catalogs. Learn how to give your users access to a wide selection of print and electronic content with this jargon-free, step-by-step guide. Breeding outlines the important functions and features of next-gen catalogs, briefs you on all of the available commercial and open source software, and helps you select which products are right for your library’s next-gen catalog. You’ll learn to lay the groundwork for practical implementation, integrate the catalog into your existing technological environment, address a multitude of common implementation issues and concerns, and assess the impact of your Catalog so you can demonstrate the change you led. There is a thorough glossary with definitions for all key terms, and as with all the Tech Set guides, material is presented in a manner that is both accessible to non-technical professionals and useful for systems librarians.

Posted on

A Library’s Online Catalog Is Computerized Index Of

Criminal Justice Research in Libraries and on the Internet
by Bonnie R. Nelson, Marilyn Lutzker

Library research has changed dramatically since Marilyn Lutzker and Eleanor Ferrall’s Criminal Justice Research in Libraries was published in 1986. In addition to covering the enduring elements of traditional research, this new edition provides full coverage of research using the World Wide Web, hypertext documents, computer indexes, and other online resources. It gives an in-depth explanation of such concepts as databases, networks, and full text, and the Internet gets a full chapter. The chapters on bibliographic searching, the library catalog, and comparative research are almost totally new, and chapters on indexes and abstracts, newsletters, newspapers and news broadcasts, documents, reports and conference proceedings, and statistics reflect the shift to computerized sources. The chapter on legal resources discusses the wealth of legal information available on the Internet. A new chapter on library research in forensic science corrects an omission from the first book.

With the growth of computerized indexes and the Internet, more and more researchers are admitting that they feel inadequate to the new tools. Librarians themselves are struggling to keep abreast of the new technology. This book will help students, practitioners, scholars, and librarians develop a sense of competency in doing criminal justice research.


The Reference Library User
by William A. Katz, Bill Katz

Provide the best possible service to your library patrons. With a healthy respect for those who seek assistance at the reference desk, a group of library and information service specialists examine the public whom they serve. The Reference Library User focuses on the possible interactions between the reference librarian and the library user. The authoritative contributors discuss many problems in the relationship between the public and the library, and all offer suggestions that will at least help librarians to better serve the public on a daily basis.

A major emphasis of The Reference Library User is on the various populations using the library and their particular needs. For example, one chapter examines the information needs of deinstitutionalized patrons and presents methods of providing service and a rationale for community outreach. The state program in Rhode Island is outlined, describing efforts to reach community residents through public libraries and the state operated Bookmobile. Other chapters provide strategies for providing reference services to older adults, the learning disabled, the blind, and the physically handicapped.

This informative new volume also deals with general concerns facing librarians today, including determining the audience for both public and academic libraries, educating the user, encouraging nonusers to become library users, and calming irate patrons.

Reference librarians will be particularly interested in the problems and solutions discussed in this new volume, as will library managers and administrators who will always benefit from a fresh perspective on public service for the library user.

Next-gen Library Catalogs
by Marshall Breeding

Today’s Web-savvy users often bypass traditional library catalogs for more interactive, tech-friendly interfaces. Help your library stand out within the crowded landscape of information providers with Marshall Breeding’s new, highly practical guide to interactive next-generation library catalogs. Learn how to give your users access to a wide selection of print and electronic content with this jargon-free, step-by-step guide. Breeding outlines the important functions and features of next-gen catalogs, briefs you on all of the available commercial and open source software, and helps you select which products are right for your library’s next-gen catalog. You’ll learn to lay the groundwork for practical implementation, integrate the catalog into your existing technological environment, address a multitude of common implementation issues and concerns, and assess the impact of your Catalog so you can demonstrate the change you led. There is a thorough glossary with definitions for all key terms, and as with all the Tech Set guides, material is presented in a manner that is both accessible to non-technical professionals and useful for systems librarians.

Principles of Research in Behavioral Science
by Bernard E. Whitley, Jr., Mary E. Kite

This book provides a comprehensive overview of research methods in the behavioral sciences, focusing primarily on the conceptual issues inherent in conducting research. It covers topics that are often omitted from other texts, including measurement issues, correlational research, qualitative research, and integrative literature reviews. The book also includes discussions of diversity issues as they related to behavioral science research. New to this edition are chapter boxes that focus on applied issues related to each chapter topic. Throughout the book, readable examples and informative tables and figures are provided. The authors also take a contemporary approach to topics such as research ethics, replication research, and data collection (including internet research).


Community Practice
by David A. Hardcastle

For almost two decades, Community Practice has been a definitive text for social workers, community practitioners, and students eager to help individuals contribute to and use community resources or work to change oppressive community structures. In this third edition, a wealth of new charts and cases spotlight the linkages between theoretical orientations and practical skills, with an enhanced emphasis on the inherently political nature of social work and community practice. Boxes, examples, and exercises illustrate the range of skills and strategies available to savvy community practitioners in the 21st century, including networking, marketing and staging, political advocacy, and leveraging information and communication technologies. Other features include: – New material on community practice ethics, critical practice skills, community assessment and assets inventory and mapping, social problem analysis, and applying community ractice skills to casework practice – Consideration of post-9/11 community challenges – Discussion on the changing ethnic composition of America and what this means for practitioners – An exploration of a vastly changed political landscape following the election of President Obama, the Great Recession, the rise of the Tea Party, and the increasing political and corporate use of pseudo-grassroots endeavors – A completely revamped instructor’s manual available online at www.oup.com/us/communitypractice This fully revised classic text provides a comprehensive and integrated overview of the community theory and skills fundamental to all areas of social work practice. Broad in scope and intensive in analysis, it is suitable for undergraduate as well as graduate study. Community Practice offers students and practitioners the tools necessary to promote the welfare of individuals and communities by tapping into the ecological foundations of community and social work practice.

Principles of Research in Behavioral Science
by Bernard E. Whitley, Mary E. Kite

Intended for beginning graduate or advanced undergraduate students, this book provides a comprehensive review of research methods used in psychology and related disciplines. It covers topics that are often omitted in other texts including correlational and qualitative research and integrative literature reviews. Basic principles are reviewed for those who need a refresher. The focus is on conceptual issues ¿ statistics are kept to a minimum. Featuring examples from all fields of psychology, the book addresses laboratory and field research. Chapters are written to be used independently, so instructors can pick and choose those that fit their course needs. Reorganized to parallel the steps of the research process, tips on writing reports are also provided. Each chapter features an outline, key terms, a summary, and questions and exercises that integrate chapter topics and put theory into practice. A glossary and an annotated list of readings are now included.

Extensively updated throughout, the new edition features a new co-author, Mary Kite, and:
¿ New chapters on qualitative research and content analysis and another on integrative literature reviews including meta-analysis, critical techniques for today¿s research environment.
¿ A new chapter on exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis that addresses the use of path analysis and structural equation modeling.
¿ A new chapter on how to write a research report using APA style.
¿ Examples from cross-cultural and multi-cultural research, neuroscience, cognitive, and developmental psychology along with ones from social, industrial, and clinical psychology.
¿ More on Internet research and studies.
¿ Greatly expanded Part 3 on research designs with chapters on true experiments, field research, correlational and single-case designs, content analysis, and survey and qualitative research.
¿ A website with PowerPoint slides for each chapter, a test bank with short answer and multiple choice questions, additional teaching resources, and the tables and figures from the book for Instructor¿s and chapter outlines, suggested readings, and links to related web sites for students.

Intended as a text for beginning graduate and/or advanced undergraduate courses in research methods or experimental methods or design taught in psychology, human development, family studies, education, or other social and behavioral sciences, a prerequisite of undergraduate statistics and a beginning research methods course is assumed.


MEDOC
by

Index of U.S. government literature on health statistics and research information and health care delivery and education material for the lay public.

Encyclopedia of Library and Information Science
by Allen Kent

“The Encyclopedia of Library and Information Science provides an outstanding resource in 33 published volumes with 2 helpful indexes. This thorough reference set–written by 1300 eminent, international experts–offers librarians, information/computer scientists, bibliographers, documentalists, systems analysts, and students, convenient access to the techniques and tools of both library and information science. Impeccably researched, cross referenced, alphabetized by subject, and generously illustrated, the Encyclopedia of Library and Information Science integrates the essential theoretical and practical information accumulating in this rapidly growing field.”